Medicine Woman’s Larder – Asparagus – One of the first frozen foods 2000 years ago.

Medicine Womans larder

For thousands of years food has not only been consumed to provide nourishment or to satisfy our tastebuds. It has also been used extensively to heal many conditions that today we would automatically reach for a pill for including  water retention, a healthy intestinal flora and to boost the immune system.

N.B  This is not to say that you should suddenly stop taking any medication that has been prescribed for you without the absolute agreement of your doctor. However, for minor ailments that you are buying over the counter medication for, you may find that eating your way to health is a much more palatable alternative. Certainly they will do you no harm which is something that is difficult to guarantee with many over the counter medications.

Fresh asparagus is wonderful and eaten with a little melted butter and pepper is delicious. I have a video that shows you how to prepare asparagus to get maximum flavour and nutrition, but there are some wonderful recipes if you search the web.

asparagus

HISTORY OF ASPARAGUS
Asparagus is a member of the lily family and the spears that we eat are shoots grown underground. The ancient Greeks used the word asparagus to describe any young tender shoots that were picked and eaten. It was cultivated over 2,000 years ago in that part of the mediterranean and the Romans then picked up a liking for the delicacy eating fresh and dried out of season.

Asparagus became such a delicacy that the Romans went one step further in their desire to eat fresh all year round. Chariots would race to the Alps to freeze the tender shoots in the year round snow for six months and then race back with it in time for one of the major events of the year – The Feast of Epicurus. Fleets of galleons took the shoots to all corners of the Empire and over the centuries other countries adopted this delicacy and it now grows in many parts of the world.

There are huge health benefits from eating asparagus on a regular basis and it is packed with the important Vitamin K.

Vitamin K is essential for efficient blood clotting but recently research has identified that it has many other roles within the body. It may help prevent heart disease and osteoporosis. It is a stronger anti-oxidant than Vitamin E or Coenzyme Q10 and it may also inhibit the growth of certain cancers such as breast, ovary, colon, stomach and kidney cancer.

As an antioxidant it has been approved for the treatment of osteoporosis in Japan due to its action in the synthesis of osteocalcin which attracts calcium to the bone matrix. It has also shown benefits in other areas such as preventing calcification of arteries and soft tissues which can lead to heart attacks. As well as preventing calcification it helps regulate the body’s calcium which is extremely important in organs such as the brain or kidneys that are vulnerable to calcium deposits leading to damage or the formation of stones.

A LINK BETWEEN LEVELS OF VITAMIN K AND BRAIN DISEASE
The brain is a fascinating part of our bodies with relatively little known about certain areas that remain uncharted. Research is particularly active in areas such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, as this more than any of the degenerative diseases, leaves us so vulnerable and in need of total care.

IL-6 is a chemical transmitter for the immune system, which promotes inflammation. As we age this process gets out of control and it results in excessive inflammation throughout the body, including the joints and the brain. Alzheimer’s patients have very high levels of IL-6 in their brains. Vitamin K is thought to prevent this and if the link can be proved then eating asparagus as part of a healthy eating plan could be an easy way for everyone to increase this vital vitamin.

OTHER PARTS OF THE BODY AFFECTED BY A DEFICIENCY OF VITAMIN K

A deficiency of this vitamin K has been linked to elevated levels of blood sugar, as the pancreas, which makes insulin normally, contains the second highest amount of vitamin K than anywhere in the body.

OTHER NUTRIENTS ASPARAGUS OFFERS US.

As well as Vitamin K, asparagus also contains the following nutrients in varying amounts.. whilst it looks like a great deal more information than you might need; I hope it reinforces how nutritionally important the food is that I feature.  I could just tell you that asparagus contains Folate, Vitamin C, A, B1, B2, B3, B6, Tryptophan, Manganese, Copper, Phosphorus, potassium, iron, zinc, magnesium, selenium, and calcium.  But does that really mean anything?  I think that it helps you view the food you eat differently if you can associate it with a more comprehensive look at its various elements.

FOLATE: FOLIC ACID; Folic acid is a B Vitamin essential for cell replication and growth. It helps form the building blocks of DNA the body’s genetic information which is why it is recommended prior to conception and during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy to ensure the rapidly growing and replicating cells of the foetus are normal. This helps prevent low birth weight and abnormalities such as Heart defects or lip and palate malformations.

It is essential for transporting co-enzymes needed for amino acid metabolism in the body and is necessary for a functioning nervous system

VITAMIN B1: THIAMINE; This vitamin is essential in the metabolism of carbohydrates and for the strength of the nervous system. Every cell in the body requires this vitamin to form the fuel that the body runs on ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate).

VITAMIN B2: RIBOFLAVIN; Also essential for metabolising carbohydrates to produce ATP, and also fats, amino acids and proteins too. It is necessary to activate Vitamin B6 and Folic Acid. It works with enzymes in the liver to eliminate toxins. It is water-soluble

VITAMIN B3: NIACIN; Also needed for the metabolism of carbohydrates (ATP), fats and proteins. Needed to process Alcohol. Niacin form of B3 helps regulate Cholesterol. In addition it is essential for the formation or red blood cells and the hormones. It works with Tryptophan in protein to form Serotonin and Melatonin in the brain

VITAMIN B6: PYRIDOXINE; The Master Vitamin for processing Amino Acids – the building blocks of all proteins and some hormones. It assists in the formation of several Neurotransmitters and can therefore help regulate mood. It has been shown to help lower Homocysteine levels in the blood linked to heart disease, osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease. It produces Haemoglobin the Oxygen carrying pigment in the blood. It helps the release of carbohydrates stored in the liver and muscles for energy. It is involved in the production of antibodies and it helps balance female hormones. It is needed for the production of serotonin along with tryptophan and B12.

TRYPTOPHAN: Tryptophan is an essential amino acid that is the lowest in terms of levels needed by the body. It is responsible for normal sleep patterns. Vitamin B6 is needed for the formation of tryptophan, which affects serotonin levels. These serotonin levels influence sleep and mood.

VITAMIN C: ASCORBIC ACID; An antioxidant that protects LDL cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein) from oxidative damage, leading to hardening of the arteries. May also protect against heart disease reducing the hardening of arteries and the tendency of platelets to clump together blocking them. Vitamin C is necessary to form collagen, which acts like glue strengthening parts of the body such as muscles and blood vessels. It aids with healing and is a natural anti-histamine.

It is essential for the action of the Immune system and plays a part in the actions of the white blood cells and anti-bodies. It protects other antioxidants A and E from free radical damage and is involved in the production of some adrenal hormones.

MANGANESE: Needed for healthy skin, bone and cartilage formation as well as glucose tolerance. Also forms part of the antioxidant superoxide dismutase, which helps prevent free radical damage.

COPPER: Copper is an essential trace element needed to absorb and utilise Iron. It is needed to make ATP and is also to synthesise some hormones and blood cells. Collagen needs copper, as does the enzyme tyrosinase, which plays a role in the production of skin pigment. Too much copper in the diet can depress levels of zinc and effect wound healing.

PHOSPHORUS: Essential for bone formation and production of red blood cells. Also needed for the production of ATP fuel for energy. Small amounts are involved in most of the chemical reactions throughout the body.

POTASSIUM: This is the main cation (positively charged electrolyte). It reacts with sodium and chloride to maintain a perfect working environment in and around each cell. It allows the transmission of nerve impulses and helps maintain the correct fluid balance in the body. It also regulates levels of acidity and alkalinity in the body. It is also required for carbohydrate and protein metabolism. It is connected to normal heart rhythms.

IRON: The main function of iron is in haemoglobin, which is the oxygen-carrying component of blood. When someone is iron deficient they suffer extreme fatigue because they are being starved of oxygen. Iron is also part of myoglobin which helps muscle cells store oxygen and it is also essential for the formation of ATP

ZINC: A trace mineral that is a component in the body’s ability to repair wounds, maintain fertility, synthesis protein, cell reproduction, maintain eyesight, act as an antioxidant and boost immunity. It can be used topically for skin conditions. It is essential for a functioning metabolism and hormone production such as testosterone. It is also needed for the production of stomach acid. Too much zinc will depress the copper levels in the body.

MAGNESIUM: It is essential mineral needed for bone, protein and fatty acid formation, forming new cells, activating the B vitamins, relaxing muscles, clotting blood and forming ATP the fuel the body runs on. The secretion and action of insulin also needs magnesium. It is needed to balance calcium in the body and too much can result in very low levels of calcium. The best food sources are whole grains, beans, seeds, wheat germ, dried apricots, dark green vegetables, soybeans and fish.

SELENIUM: A very important trace mineral that activates an antioxidant enzyme called glutathione peroxidase, which may help protect the body from cancer. It is vital for immune system function and may help prevent prostate cancer.

CALCIUM: The most abundant and essential mineral in the body. There are approximately two to three pounds mainly found in the teeth and bones. Apart from its role in the formation of teeth and bones it is also required for blood clotting, transmission of signals in nerve cells and muscle contractions. There is some indication that higher calcium intake protects against cardiovascular disease particularly in women. If you are at risk of kidney stones consult your doctor before taking in additional calcium supplements. This also applies if you are suffering from prostate cancer where there may be a link between increased levels of dietary calcium in dairy products and this form of cancer. It is thought it is thought that excess calcium causes lower levels of Vitamin D, which helps protect against prostate cancer.

THE IMMUNE SYSTEM

As with all fresh fruit and vegetables the antioxidants in asparagus such as Vitamin A, C and selenium have an overall benefit for the body. I cannot keep stressing the importance of a healthy immune system enough.

One area that is of increasing concern is drug resistant microorganisms such as MRSA. This is the resistant strain of bacteria that is causing such upheaval in health care facilities. Sick people in hospitals have weak immune systems and it leaves them very vulnerable to these infections. My philosophy is that if you have a very healthy immune system you rarely become sick anyway.

Accidents however are unavoidable especially with the elderly who might fall and require replacement hip or other joint surgery. If the elderly person eats well and has a healthy immune system when they undergo the surgery they are far less likely to contract MRSA. If you have elective surgery planned and you have several weeks or months to wait on the list, use it to your advantage. Build your immune system up before you go in and you will improve your recovery rate as well as help protect yourself from disease.

WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO PREPARE ASPARAGUS?

Cut off the fibrous base before cooking, as this can be tough and difficult to digest. Make sure it is thoroughly washed. Tie the stalks together with cooking twine and either boil the whole bundle or stand it upright in boiling water in a special asparagus pan so that the tender tips steam and the tougher stalks boil. I also use one of the electronic steamers and this leaves the shoots tender and colourful.

You can roast with other vegetables such as red peppers, onions and mushrooms in a little olive oil.

Sauté chopped asparagus with shitake mushrooms and turkey and add to a little brown rice.

Serve hot or cold with a spinach and walnut salad.

Here is a video that might help if you are new to using this vegetable.

I hope that you have found this post useful and look forward to your feedback. Thanks Sally

14 thoughts on “Medicine Woman’s Larder – Asparagus – One of the first frozen foods 2000 years ago.

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  3. Pingback: Medicine Woman’s Larder – Asparagus – One of the first frozen foods 2000 years ago. | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

  4. Pingback: Medicine Woman’s Larder – Asparagus – One of the first frozen foods 2000 years ago. | Annette Rochelle Aben

  5. Yum, my favourite vegetable, and so expensive here. I love it with garlic, steamed for a few moments and a quick saute with olive oil. But oh my, it does leave a pungent smell in urine from the asperic? acid. 🙂 xoxo

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Pingback: Smorgasbord Round Up – Treasure in the Garden!! – Organisational skills and Courtroom Humour | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

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