The Medicine Woman’s Treasure Chest – Chamomile – Herbal remedy and lotion

medicine womanThe botanical name for Chamomile (Camomile) is Anthemis Nobilis and we are more familiar with it in tea form which is usually available on our supermarket shelves.

Chamomile has been used for centuries as a herbal remedy for a number of common ailments including fevers and joint pain and is also very calming for rashes and other skin inflammations.

chamomile

The use of the herb goes back to ancient Egypt and its use filtered across the world over the next thousand years or so and by the time of the middle ages it was being used by herbalists in Europe. The flowers of the plant were soaked in white wine as a cure for water retention, then knows as dropsy and also for liver conditions such as jaundice. It was also found to have a calming effect on patients, relieved inflammation and could also relieve chest infections and asthma.

And if you were looking to avoid bleach in your hair dye… the women of the past would make a dye from the flowers to lighten their hair naturally.

Research is extensive into this herb and there are a number of varieties that have both a different physical appearance and growth pattern as well as varying health benefits.

Here is just a brief list of the health issues that the oil, tea and lotion can be applied to.

  • If you drink chamomile tea (infusions) regularly then you may find that it ease muscle and rheumatic conditions, skin rashes and help you sleep better at night. It has ananti-spasmodic action that helps digestion and is great to drink after a meal. It may also help alleviate morning sickness when drunk first thing.
  • For anyone who suffers gastrointestinal problems such as diverticulitis, IBS or ulcerative colitis drinking the tea daily may help relieve the symptoms and heal the gut to prevent leaky gut syndrome. There is some research that indicates that it may relieve the inflammation associated with Crohn’s Disease but I do advise that you talk to a herbalist before using.
  • It certainly appears to have a relaxing effect on both adults and young children and is one herb that can be used for babies. But, do always ask the advice of a qualified herbalists before you do so to make sure you are using correct dosages of infusions before using to help with teething problems and stomach upsets in babies. Essential oil should not be used on children under the age of five years.
  • As an anti-spasmodic you can use to ease cramping during a period and to help relieve the symptoms of the menupause.
  • It may relieve hayfever and other allergies particularly when used as a lotion on skin rashes or inflammation. It can also stimulate healing of wounds or burns but again follow directions when used for this purpose. If you use some drops in your bath water it is soothing for a number of skin conditions such as eczema and also act as an anti-bacterial agent to prevent the spread of any infections.
  • Use a drop of oil in some warm water for an effective mouthwash and to help heal soft tissue in the mouth including gum disease.

I tend to use A. Vogel for my herbal remedies and they do a very good lotion. http://www.avogel.ie/body-care/chamomile-ointment/

I use Celestial Seasonings or Numi herbal teas but check out your local health food shop as they usually carry good quality tea and lotions.

Do remember not to discontinue any prescribed medication without first discussing with your doctor.

Contraindications for the use of Chamomile oils and infusions.

  • Because of the anti-spasmodic effect of chamomile and because it could cause contractions, pregnant women should not use the essential oil.
  • Essential oils should not be used on children under the age of five.
  • Both the tea and essential oil can increase the effect of certain prescribed sedatives or anti-depressants.
  • Both the tea and essential oil must not be taken with anti-coagulants such as Warfarin.

I hope you have found this useful. I drink chamomile on a regular basis and find it particularly beneficial last thing at night to help me sleep through.

Thanks for dropping in and you will find a selection of herbal posts in this directory or search Medicine Woman’s Treasure Chest.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/smorgasbord-nutrition-directory/

 

 

 

 

 

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About Smorgasbord - Variety is the Spice of Life.

My name is Sally Cronin and I am doing what I love.. Writing. Books, short stories, Haiku and blog posts. My previous jobs are only relevant in as much as they have gifted me with a wonderful filing cabinet of memories and experiences which are very useful when putting pen to paper. I move between non-fiction health books and posts and fairy stories, romance and humour. I love variety which is why I called my blog Smorgasbord Invitation and you will find a wide range of subjects. You can find the whole story here. Find out more at https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/about-me/

18 thoughts on “The Medicine Woman’s Treasure Chest – Chamomile – Herbal remedy and lotion

  1. Pingback: The Medicine Woman’s Treasure Chest – Chamomile – Herbal remedy and lotion | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

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  3. Pingback: The Medicine Woman’s Treasure Chest – Chamomile – Herbal remedy and lotion | Annette Rochelle Aben

  4. Others may not mind the taste but I can’t stand it – however I do drink it when IBS flares up and get round the taste issue by adding honey and elderflower cordial. The tea also makes a soothing eyewash if you can secure the tea bag over an insect bite it will reduce the swelling.

    Liked by 1 person

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