Guest Writer – Essay Seven – Part Two – Fantastic Realms: Angels and Demons

Part one of this special essay was yesterday and you can find it here: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/06/guest-writer-fantastic-realms-1-genius-loci-by-horatio-grin/

Fantastic Realms 2: Angels and Demons by Horatio Grin.

It is not surprising the Huldr and Nixie appear to bridge two of the planes of existence; the mortal plane due to their appearance and the angelic due to their kindred Chinese fox spirits having the same sexual appetites as demon succubi. Both angels and demons have produced offspring with the children of Man. As I said earlier, according to the Religions of the Book, the major demons were once angels. Satan himself is a fallen angel.

The sacred writings of the Religions of the Book are the only sources we have of angelic lore. Although they are based in much older traditions, those traditions were corrupted over the millennia due to the view there is but one god; an idea which reduces all other celestial beings to angels or demons.

Islam recognises four Religions of the Book, so called because at their heart is an almost common scripture. These are Zoroastrism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam; which makes it a shame that they are persistently at each other’s throats: except for Zoroastrism now almost obliterated through persecution and only found in outposts in Iran and in the Farsi of Northern India.

As people are familiar with the big three, here is a summary of the original. Zoroastrism, the first monotheistic religion, was founded in ancient Persia by the mythical prophet Zoroaster. It gave rise to many concepts common to the Religions of the Book. There is one god, Ahura Mazda, the Wise Lord of Light, whose symbol is the sun and fire. There is a battle between good and evil under the messiah-like Mithra (in the Roman Empire the cult of Mithras was a rival to Christianity) and his demon twin Ahriman. At Judgement Day the Sons of Light, Mithra’s righteous followers, will triumph, driving Ahriman’s followers into everlasting flame, while they are rewarded in paradise.

Over the centuries a lot of angelic lore was deleted from the holy books of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. However ancient excluded books such as the Book of Enoch and Hemetic texts from the third century library of fifty-two Gnostic texts discovered in Nag Hammadi in 1945 are more forthcoming.

Many of these works were previously only known as quotes or corrupted versions from the Corpus Hermeticum, a sixth century collection of manuscripts written in Greek, Hebrew, Syriac and Coptic (ancient Egyptian written in the Greek alphabet). They were attributed to Hermes Trimegistus (Thrice Great) a combination of Hermes, the Ancient Greek messenger god and Thoth, the Egyptian bird-headed god of writing and magic.

The books tell of God creating the choirs of angels to control the rhythms of creation. As angelic lore was built up over millennia there is no definite list of angels. Different books may call the same angels by different names. We think of angels as essentially winged humans. This is a mistake. Only the cherubim and the lowest choir of the malakim look human, for they were made in the creator’s image to act as messengers from God and man.

Guardian angels come from the malakim. Like elementals their leaders, the Archangels, are a single attribute, not of nature but of God: Michael is like God; Gabriel is the strength of God; Uriel the light; Raphael the healer; Jophiel the countenance and Hadraniel the greatness. Guardian angels and similar divine attributes called the ‘Divine Sparks’ are found in Zoroastrism: Goodness, Righteousness, Dominion, Devotion, Wholeness and Immortality.

We can see man and melakim are closely related by the fact two prophets were elevated to archangels. They are Metatron and Sandalphon and once were the Old Testament prophets Enoch and Elijah. Both were carried bodily to heaven in a fiery chariot to act as scribes recording names in the book of life.

The higher choirs consist of Seraphim, God’s attendants. They are ‘full of eyes all round’ and have six wings, to cover their faces and their feet, and a further two for flight. Cherubim, manlike and double winged, guard God’s glory. The many eyed Ophanim are the fiery wheels of God’s throne. Hashmallim are fiery thunder clouds. Thrones embody humble submission to God’s order, while the Dominions oversee the working of the universe. The Virtues govern nature and control the elements, while the warrior Powers defend man and the universe against evil.

There are also two other choirs which may be related to God’s own Cherubim as they have the shape of men. They are the Elohim: puzzlingly referred to as ‘Gods’ and the Bene Elohim: ‘Sons of Gods’. These may be the angels who rebelled against God and were cast out of Heaven to become demons and whose leader was Lucifer- the Light-bringer, who appeared before dawn as the Morning Star- the planet Venus.

The Book of Enoch says rebel angels lusting after the beautiful Daughters of Man, came down to earth to take them as wives, and taught them enchantments. It is likely the beautiful women were Adam’s daughters to his first wife Lilith who left the Garden of Eden to live with the archangel Samael- Venom of God- a seducer and destroyer. Lilith is now remembered as a winged demon with clawed owl feet; a succubus and the mother of witches. She may be Inanna: the mother of the Ancient Mesopotamian gods.

Later Enoch mysteriously calls the rebel angels ‘Watchers’. He says they deserted their appointed habitations to gratify their lust. Originally it was an angelic duty to guide the seven visible plants across the heavens: the Sun and Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus, Jupiter and Saturn. Each planet had its own sound (the music of the spheres) still used today in the musical octave: the eight note is a repeat of the first but higher. They also gave their names to the days of the week. Sun-day Moon Day, Twys (Norse god of War) Day, Wotens (Norse Mercury) Day, Thor’s (Norse Jupiter) Day and Freya’s Day (Norse Venus) and Saturn’s Day.

The offspring of the Sons of Gods and the Daughters of Man were the Nephilim. They may be the Djinn of Islam. Djinn are certainly identified with whole range of demons from the flesh-eating shape-shifting ghoul that haunts cemeteries; the Ifrit, giant winged demons of smoke; Djinni, female djinn who prey on sleeping men as succubi, to the Shaytan (Satan) a group of powerful Djinn thrown out of heaven for refusing to obey God’s will when he demanded they bow before Adam. Their leader is Iblis, the devil himself.

Before God created Adam from mud, he made the Djinn from smokeless fire. Like both the angels and man, God gave the Djinn free-will, making them the third race of beings who have the choice of obeying God or not.

In many ways Djinn are similar to their younger brother, Man, for they live in cities where they eat, marry and die, have armies and kings. However they live much longer than Man.

Made from subtle fire Djinns have no physical form and so thousands can live in a tiny hole. Generally they remain invisible, although they can see us, but over the centuries some have taken on human form to live unknown among us. They can also transform themselves into animals.

Like fallen angels, Djinn are powerful magical beings. Some specialise in Black Magic. According to legend, King Solomon used invisible Djinn to build his magnificent temple in Jerusalem. His legendary grimoire, a book of spells, that allowed him to summon and gain mastery over the Djinn is the much sought after Key of Solomon.

With the examination of ethereal beings at an end, you are in a position to see how subtle the relationships are between these different entities. I also sincerely hope you now understand why I feared being drawn into labyrinthine explanations when attempting to discuss the human type fairies found in Celtic myth.

©Horatio Grin 2017

A brief bio for Horatio Grin

Horatio William Grin was born 29 July 1940 in the village of Kingstone Warren, Oxfordshire, in the shadow of White Horse Hill. His parents were William George Grin, Barrister and latterly King’s Counsel and Beatrice Caroline Grin nee Lough, a younger daughter of Squire Horatio Arthur Lough of the Oxfordshire Loughs.

After matriculating from Whychwood and Rye School, where he stayed as a day boarder, Horatio Grin went up to Girton and Caius College at Cambridge to read Particulate Physics, graduating with First Class Honours. For his Masters he read Russian and Mandarin. Eschewing a career with his alma mater, he joined military intelligence at the age of 23. Little is known of him for the next twenty-five years except for small snippets from diverse sources.

H. W. Grin is credited as a Research Assistant in the abstract of a paper from a team headed by Professor Able Epstein of Cambridge University. Professor Epstein acted as a Senior Researcher at the Los Alomos Facility in New Mexico during the atomic bomb tests. The research paper is not particularly significant, a description of the projected paths of post-collision sub-atomic particles.

His latest work on fairy lore called ‘Fairies: a Hidden History, the Collected Essays of Horatio Grin’, again containing no publisher’s mark, is a series of articles rumoured to be from the Archives of the Magi Temple of Central England. The essays are remarkable for effortlessly marrying ancient mythology and fairy folklore with the latest discoveries in the scientific disciplines of archaeology, genetics and physics. They are currently the subject of controversy among different schools of occult thought.

Please follow the link to read the full biography of this remarkable man: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/19/smorgasbord-guest-writer-19th-june-to-27th-june-author-horatio-grin-biography/

You can read all the previous essays by Horatio Grin in this directory:https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/guest-writer-fairies-the-hidden-history-by-horatio-grin/

As always Horatio would appreciate your feedback.. thanks Sally

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11 thoughts on “Guest Writer – Essay Seven – Part Two – Fantastic Realms: Angels and Demons

  1. Pingback: Guest Writer – Essay Seven – Part Two – Fantastic Realms: Angels and Demons | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

  2. Pingback: Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – Magic, Music and Master storytellers oh and a bit of a laugh | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

I would be delighted to receive your feedback. Thanks Sally

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