Odd Jobs and Characters – Dental Surgery Part Two – Sally Cronin

As part of my book launch for What’s in a Name Volume II, I am sharing some of the sometimes quirky jobs that I have taken on over the years. This ranged from chasing schoolboy postcard thieves along Southsea seafront… to selling bull semen at agricultural shows (I won’t go into too much detail about that one!) Anyway for this week I will schedule on my blog and then I will be handing the posts over to 12 kind friends who will host them for me. The first of these is D.G. Kaye on August 18th when I will detail my escapades in the shoe department of our local department store.

You can previous posts in the series in this directory. https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/sallys-odd-jobs-and-characters/

The Dental Surgery Part Two

Previously…..

After many years of not being able to have a baby… Miss Smith was pregnant and could not stand the sight of blood!  So began a very intensive training course and my career took a very different path.

I was now 18 years old and have been studying the dental nurse course at home and in quiet periods in the surgery. I had also been getting practical experience on the basic tasks required by a chairside assistant, and having done a first aid course I found that I slipped into this role quite quickly.  In those days on job training was common, and because there was not such a wide range of procedures carried out, it was intensive but thorough. Also in those days there were not the technical aspects to the profession to contend with. Poor patients were lucky to get an anaesthetic for minor fillings!

By this time Roland was 68 and he was a tough boss. He had been in the army during the second world war and after retiring at 50 had gone into private practice. He did rather treat me as a squaddie and this extended to the daily deep cleaning of the surgery. Apart from washing down all the surfaces with anteseptic wash, including chair and its attachments I was expected to sterilise all instruments after each patient in a temperamental boiler. I was also equipped with a toothbrush, and all cracks and seams on the chair and the cabinet that contained the instruments and drugs had to be cleaned with hot water and soap each Wednesday afternoon when Roland went out sailing.

Our equipment was not exactly state-of-the-art, and some of it actually had done service in the desert. For example, at that time, in the sixties, we had frequent power cuts during the miners strikes. This of course meant that the electric, high-speed drill was non-operational. So, out would come the ‘squeeze-box’. This powered a drill attached to a pulley. Roland would pump up and down on a pedal and this provided enough energy to operate the drill at a painfully slow speed. I operated another squeeze box that powered the suction pipe. Painful enough just watching, so I can only imagine what it was like for the patient.

Another of my jobs was to develop the X-rays, and on one occasion this led to a bit of a ‘miracle’. The developing was done in a small broom cupboard at the top of the stairs. It contained two tall, narrow, tanks, one for developing and one for fixing, and I had to wear elbow length rubber gloves to handle the chemicals.

For processing, the X-rays were clipped into a metal holder which had four metal clips each side of the main central shaft. A sticker was put on this shaft showing which patient each X-ray belonged to. On this particular occasion, when I was in a hurry, I inadvertently opened the clip at the top of the holder and released all eight X-rays into the fixer tank. You have to remember that I was operating in very subdued lighting and I had to fish around in the tank with my gloved hand to find these slippery little bits of film.

At last, I got them all out and because they were now developed and fixed, I could switch the main light on. But, whose X-ray was which? I did my best, and put all eight films back in the holder to dry.

Nothing happened for about two weeks. I was doing the accounts while Roland was taking impressions for some dentures when I got the call. I entered the surgery to find a lovely lady in her seventies in the chair. She smiled at me revealing her pink gums and nothing else. I turned to my boss who was holding an X-ray up to the window and examining it closely.

‘Imagine my extreme surprise to discover, on removing this patient’s  X-ray from her notes, that she has grown a complete set of new teeth and indeed has a whole jaw of second teeth to follow.’  Thankfully, the correct X-ray was located in one of our younger patient’s notes, but from then on, I always checked the X-rays in the notes before handing them over for the appointment.

There were still the odd times when I wished I was anywhere else but in that surgery, but looking back, even those times were amusing.

During an upper tooth extraction I would place two clasped hands over the patient’s head to keep it nice and steady whilst Roland applied pressure to the tooth before removing. On one occasion as I applied the necessary force, I felt the patient’s hair begin to move. I was terrified that I had scalped him but then realised it was a toupee. It slipped back and forth during the procedure and unfortunately the patient left with it askew as I was unable to get it back in its proper position. Do you know how hard it is for an 19 year old not to giggle in that situation!

After two years I felt that I would like to take my training further, and considered training as a State Registered Nurse. The Queen Alexandra Nursing Service was advertising for recruits at the time and the uniform was very attractive. However, fate was to take yet another hand in my destiny!

Some of the more memorable patients have appeared in my short stories..

Next week – The Shoe Department – Cheating and surprises….This post is being hosted on D.G. Kaye’s wonderful blog https://dgkayewriter.com/ on Friday August 18th.. I will post a link on the day so you can head over and read.

My latest book – What’s in a Name – Volume Two.

Our legacy is not always about money or fame, but rather in the way that people remember our name after we have gone. In these sixteen short stories we discover the reasons why special men and women will stay in the hearts and minds of those who have met them.

Kenneth watches the love of his life dance on New Year’s Eve while Lily plants very special flowers every spring for her father. Martha helps out a work colleague as Norman steps back out into the world to make a difference. Owen brings light into a house and Patrick risks his life in the skies over Britain and holds back from telling a beautiful redhead that he loves her.In one way or another all these characters will be remembered by those whose lives they have touched.

There is also a bonus story introducing a new collection The Village Square to be published in 2018.

You can buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/Whats-Name-Stories-Life-Romance-ebook/dp/B0748MLZ1W

Everything you need to know about how to buy my books and connect to me on social media is here: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/about-me/

Thank you for dropping by and your ongoing support.. It means a great deal to me.. thanks Sally

 

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39 thoughts on “Odd Jobs and Characters – Dental Surgery Part Two – Sally Cronin

  1. Pingback: Odd Jobs and Characters – Dental Surgery Part Two – Sally Cronin | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

  2. Oh my God, Sal, this was hilarious! I can just imagine your response to the tipsy toupee!! The teeth were funny too!! This is where you get your great sense of humor from experience!! Loved the stories! Thanks for sharing!! hugs xx
    I read your new book, What’s in a Name, Book 2! Loved it! I put my review on Amazon and Goodreads too! Kenneth was my favorite story. Broke my heart! Congrats on another wonderful book!! xo

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This is such a lovely and hilarious chapter Sally…. I have read this about 3 times now and it still has me howling as much as the first time! You must have been one hell of a youngster and I can see in the affection you still have for old Roland that he was just the type of character you needed to bring out the best in you… qualities you still have… not only doing it right but doing it perfect.. although if you have to you will settle for the best you can. It is really lovey reading about the people in your past because you bring them so vividly to life.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It was like a carry on film Paul with more carry on than in the last two posts.. We had the Lord Mayor in for an extraction and in those days we had a consultant anaesthetist would come in and knock the patient out completely for wisdom teeth etc. When the mayor came around he was swearing like a trooper… he looked at my boss and apologised saying he hoped no ladies were present.. my boss informed that no only I was present! Anyway … glad you enjoyed.. and by the way… the America Monkey Flower features with a haiku Saturday along with the information I found on the net… thanks for the image.. hugsxxxxx

      Liked by 1 person

      • you know Sally, these stories and those they inspired in Just an Odd Job Girl would make a great comedy film- full of laffs and tears! Glad you liked the American monkey flower, it is lovely plant but unfortunately needs a lot more warmth and dryness than it is currently getting….at the moment it is living i nthe greenhouse!

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – The Good Life #Waterford History and amazing guest writers | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

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