Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – The origins of St. Valentine Day by Micki Peluso

Delighted to share a post from Micki Peluso’s archives and appropriately today.. it is on the origins of St. Valentine’s Day….

February 14th sometimes signifies the first day of Lent, depending upon the date of Easter, and is also Admission Day in Arizona. Most people however, celebrate the day by sending comic or heartfelt Valentines to family, friends and lovers. People seem to delight in St. Valentine’s Day, as florists, candy stores, boutiques and card shops do a rallying business providing heart-shaped novelties of all variety. Chocolate, long known for having properties that produce a euphoric feeling similar to the bittersweet emotion of love, seems an appropriate gift for St. Valentine’s Day.

The origin of the holiday is uncertain, but St. Valentine actually honors two Saints of the same name. One was a Roman priest martyred during the reign of the Emperor Claudius, the other, a martyred Bishop of Interramna. They were both buried in the Flaminian Way, which was later named the Gate of St. Valentine. Today the gate is known as Porta Del Popolo — the Gate of the People. The accounts of these men’s lives are legendary, based on sparse historical fact. It is possible, researchers agree, that the legends denote different versions of the martyrdom of only one person. St. Valentine’s Day, as it is known today, is a lovers Festival, bearing no relation to these legends.

One theory as to how the name Valentine came to be applied to the day is founded on the belief in England that birds begin dating on February 14. Chaucer, in his “Parliament of Foules,” says it like this: “for this was Seynt Valentine’s day. When every foul cometh to choose his mate.” Those disagreeing with this claimed that the connection between lovers and St. Valentine stems from a similarity between the Norman word “galantin,” meaning a lover of woman, and the name of the saint. St. Still another theory contends that the lover’s custom dates back to the pagan Roman feast of Lupercalia occurring in mid-February young Roman men and women placed their names in a love urn from which their names were drawn at random. During the upcoming year, the young man would be the escorts of the women whose names were matched to their own.

The Christian clergy objected to this pagan custom and substituted the names of saints. Each person, the clergy hoped, which strive to emulate the saint drawn for them. The drawings were held on February 14, the feast of St. Valentine. Yet the drawing of names by young people on St. Valentine’s Day continued long after the Christianization of pagan rites had been abandoned. The boy and girl paired by the drawing adopted the practice of giving presents to each other. Later the boy only gave to the girl; so started the custom of sending Valentines to loved ones.

St. Valentine’s Day was widely celebrated in William Shakespeare’s time, as this quote from Hamlet illustrates:

“Good morrow, ‘tis St. Valentine’s Day,
All in the morning betime,
And I am made at your window,
To be your Valentine.”

Paper Valentines with inscribed sentiments date from the 16th century. The first printed Valentine, issued in 1669, was probably inspired by “A Valentine Writer”, a book of verses offering help to those not articulate enough to pen their own rhymes. In England, the introduction of Penny postage and envelopes in 1840 popularized the exchange of Valentines and ornamental lace paper Valentines were in great demand. In the U. S., crude woodcut Valentines were fashioned by Robert H. Elton and Thomas W. Strong of New York, but most people preferred the lace paper cards imported from England.
With the establishment of the Post Office, the mail became swamped with Valentines each February. Comic Valentines, as well as coarse vulgar ones, cost only one cent. In the early 1900s, the Chicago post office rejected 25,000 cards on the grounds that they were improper for mail delivery. By the 1930s Valentine cards were primarily an activity for small children, who were taught to make the cards and decorations in kindergarten.

On one particularly gruesome Valentine’s Day, the streets ran red with blood and the message given was not one of love. This notorious incident was “The St. Valentines Massacre,” in Chicago on February 14, 1929. Al Capone’s gang, disguised as policemen, forced seven members of the rival “Bugs Moran” gang to stand against the garage wall with their arms raised. Capone’s mobsters methodically gunned the rival gang down.

In recent years, St. Valentine’s Day continues to gain popularity, as lovers and children eagerly await its arrival; perhaps because it breaks the monotony of the long winter. However, not all people recognize the holiday. One husband whose name I will not mention, chooses to totally ignore St. Valentine’s Day, even when it falls three days after his wedding anniversary — but that’s another story.

©Micki Peluso 2016

A wonderful celebration of St. Valentine’s Day and thanks to Micki for sharing.

 

About Micki Peluso

I have written since I learned to hold a pencil. But life interfered with serious writing until a tragedy struck my family. This time I took up the pen and wrote as a catharsis to my grief–where spoken words failed, written words helped heal my wounded soul.

My first short story of the incident was published in Victimology:an International Journal, launching a career in journalism. When writing for newspapers there were no more rejections, a nice surprise. I became a staff freelance writer for a bi-weekly award winning newspaper and freelance slice of life writer for my local paper, serving a city of 600,000 people. The diversity of writing for newspapers let me experiment in many areas of writing from essays, commentaries, interviews, humor, pathos, analogy, and short fiction.

I have recently published my first non-fiction book, . . .AND THE WHIPPOORWILL SANG, dedicated to the one I lost. Published by LspDigital, it is a funny, poignant celebration of life rather than a eulogy of death. My newly released children’s book, ‘The Cat Who Wanted a Dog’ is a coloring and illustrated book for ages from 4-9 years old.

Books by Micki Peluso

One of the excellent reviews for Micki’s memoir And The Whippoorwill Sang

If there were a way to give this book ten stars, it still wouldn’t be enough. I was a paramedic and later an ER nurse and saw tragedies like this all the time, but it never became easy. The author weaves the past and the (then) present very nicely. It will make you laugh and it will make you cry. If you only buy a couple of books a year, this story should be one of them.

Read some of the many reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Micki-Peluso/e/B002BLZ7JK

and on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Micki-Peluso/e/B002BLZ7JK

Read more reviews and follow Micki on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1156697.Micki_Peluso

Connect to Micki on social media.

Blog: http://mallie1025.blogspot.ie/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/micki.peluso
Twitter: https://twitter.com/mickipeluso

Thank you for dropping in and it would be lovely to receive your feedback.. thanks Sally

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This entry was posted in It is a Wonderful Life. by Smorgasbord - Variety is the Spice of Life.. Bookmark the permalink.

About Smorgasbord - Variety is the Spice of Life.

My name is Sally Cronin and I am doing what I love.. Writing. Books, short stories, Haiku and blog posts. My previous jobs are only relevant in as much as they have gifted me with a wonderful filing cabinet of memories and experiences which are very useful when putting pen to paper. I move between non-fiction health books and posts and fairy stories, romance and humour. I love variety which is why I called my blog Smorgasbord Invitation and you will find a wide range of subjects. You can find the whole story here. Find out more at https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/about-me/

30 thoughts on “Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – The origins of St. Valentine Day by Micki Peluso

  1. Pingback: Origins of St. Valentine Day – The Militant Negro™

  2. Pingback: Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – The origins of St. Valentine Day by Micki Peluso | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

  3. Brilliant article Micki, both informative and enjoyable. I’ve learned so much (which is saying something!!!). Thanks for all your research and the engaging way you put it all together!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I like learning the history of traditions like Valentine’s Day. I had no idea this one went back so far. And naturally the church had to Christianize it. 🙂 I’m glad we have a day to celebrate love. ❤ Thanks Micki and Sally. Happy Valentine's Day!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Here’s a link for Admission day in Arizona. Thanks for reading my post.
    Admission Day – Arizona Capitol Times
    azcapitoltimes.com/news/2009/10/12/admission-day
    Admission Day is a nearly forgotten day in the history of Arizona. Sept. 26, 1864, was the date “men, by organizing and beginning work, brought American government to the newest unit of America.” Complete access to news articles on azcapitoltimes.com is available to Arizona Capitol Times’ subscribers who are logged in. Subscribers may login at the login tab below.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. First I have to laugh. I read this on the short version and thought it was continued at your page Micki, when I landed back on Sally’s longer version here. 🙂 But what a fascinating post full of history. I wasn’t aware there were variations of the origins of this holiday, but I knew about the massacre in 1929.
    I always thought St. Valentine was an angel, lol. And I hope you had a lovely Valentine’s Day, despite that ‘certain’ husband who doesn’t acknowledge it with you. At least you have Carol, lol. Girlpower! 🙂 xxx

    Liked by 2 people

I would be delighted to receive your feedback. Thanks Sally

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