Smorgasbord Health Column – Food in the News #Carbs – Don’t throw out the good ones!

I never recommend anybody give up one of the major food groups. There are some people who do require specialised diets that preclude certain foods within a group, such as gluten high grains. But that is far fewer than the multi-billion gluten free food industry would have you believe.

I eat moderate amounts of wholegrains each day. I am not as active as I used to be and don’t need them in the same quantity as I did at 35, but I still have whole grain Basmati rice with my main meal at least five days a week… with whole grain pasta on the other two.

Here are a few recent news stories about wholegrains and their nutritional value in our diet and then a brief overview of the benefits.

Eating wholegrains and high-fibre foods can actually help you maintain a LOWER weight, study finds

If you’re wanting to ditch the excess kilos, you may be contemplating a low-carb diet or cutting the food group out for good.

However, new research has shown that a diet that includes carbs – those that are unrefined and high in fibre – can actually help you lose weight.

A secondary analysis of research from the University of Wollongong found that grain quality is key, with whole grain, high-fibre foods being linked with lower weight.

Read the rest of the article: Study into obesity and wholegrains Daily Mail Article

All Hail the Whole Grain! By Jan Suszkiw March 15, 2018

A human nutrition study reaffirmed the health benefits of substituting whole-grain foods like whole-wheat bread, oatmeal, barley, rye, and brown or wild rice for refined-grain products like white bread in the diet.

Scientists with the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA)—jointly run by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts—conducted the study to clarify the role of whole grains in helping regulate weight, blood sugar levels and calorie (energy) use, among other benefits. Unlike refined grains, which undergo extensive milling or other processing, whole grains are sold for eating with their bran and other constituents intact—all rich in vitamins, minerals, fiber and other nutrients.

According to Susan Roberts, director of the Center’s Energy Metabolism Laboratory, the study was the first to strictly control participants’ diet, weight and type of whole-grain products they consumed. Previous clinical trials didn’t incorporate these important study design criteria, leaving the benefits of whole-grain diets—especially on weight management—open to being questioned.

In the eight-week study, published last year in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers determined the weights and energy intake needs of 81 participants (healthy, nonsmoking men and women ages 40 to 65) and started them on a diet free of whole grains. At week two, the researchers randomly switched some participants to diets containing the daily recommended allowance of whole grains (a minimum of three ounces for women and four ounces for men every day).

Read the rest of the article: US Dept of Agriculture

Carbohydrates – Not All are Demons – Smorgasbord Health.

Carbohydrates are a component of food that supplies us with energy in the form of calories to the body. Along with proteins and fats they provide the human body with the main elements required to be healthy. Carbohydrates are made up of sugars (simple carbohydrates), starches (complex carbohydrates) and fibre. If you take the fibre out of the formula through over processing you are just left with the sugars.. These are intense and result in blood glucose fluctuations. You may have experienced this for yourself after a heavy lunch with lots of white rice followed by a rich and sugary dessert. You become light headed and feel faint requiring a top up around 4pm in the afternoon!

To lower cholesterol levels naturally you need to eat carbohydrates that have retained the fibre element as this helps absorb some of the sugars and prevent blood glucose fluctuations.

Carbohydrates are not the demons that some would make out. They have essential elements that are required to make the perfect fuel mix for our bodies.

However,our requirement for carbohydrates will change as we get older. When we are children and young adults our growing bodies require a supercharged fuel – carbohydrates are also needed in higher concentration during periods of high activity as you get older but should be allied to that particular period of exercise. When men and women pass through the mid-life change the requirement certainly drops but levels again depend on how active your life style is.

If someone is a total couch potato drifting from bed to table, table to car, car to desk, desk to car, car to sofa – then putting a high octane fuel into the body will simply be converted to fat. However, stopping all carbohydrates is wrong – there are certain nutrients and fibre within wholegrain carbohydrates that the body needs so that the chemical balance is maintained.

You can read the rest of the post here with details on gluten and suggestions on how to include health wholgrains into your daily diet: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2015/02/03/the-cholesterol-myth-carbohydrates-not-all-are-demons/

And here is my preferred carbohydrate wholegrain rice.

Of all rice – any form of brown rice will contain more of the nutrients as it loses only the outer layer of the grain called the hull.

What vital nutrients are lost in processing wholegrain rice to the white used by the majority of consumers.

During the process that turns brown rice to white rice it loses 67% of its vitamin B3 (niacin) 80% of B1, 90% of B6 – half of its manganese and phosphorus, 60% of its iron and all the dietary fibre and essential fatty acids. Do you realise that to make white rice acceptable as a food it has to be artificially enriched with B1 B3 and iron? It is amazing the difference that processing a food can have on its nutritional content.

Brown rice is a very rich source of manganese –essential for blood health. It is also necessary for bone health and for it’s antioxidant capabilities in preventing damage to cells, particularly blood cells.

Brown rice is rich in fibre, which cleans the system of toxins and harmful deposits in the blood so helps keep your cholesterol down. Like oats it tends to release its energy slowly so maintaining stable blood sugar levels. The fibre is insoluble which means that it works through your system efficiently. This prevents some organs from getting into an overload situation like the liver and the bile duct – a speedy process through the system ensures that the bile duct does not secrete too much bile which can lead to gallstones.

Proteins like turkey are high in selenium but so is brown rice and it is very important for our immune systems and thyroid function – also to help prevent cancer as it encourages healthy DNA repair in the cells.

Magnesium is present in high quantities and this is associated with a number of systemic problems such as asthma – high blood pressure –migraine headaches and reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Magnesium does this because it helps to regulate nerve and muscle tone by balancing the action of calcium. You will see that very often calcium supplements are teamed with magnesium.

Calcium tends to rush around frantically and needs magnesium to curb its enthusiasm. For example if allowed to, calcium will overwhelm the nerve cells in the muscles and they become over activated. This causes the muscle to overwork and wear out faster. This occurs if you have insufficient magnesium in your diet. Another reason that magnesium is so important is for bone health and about two thirds of the magnesium is found in the bones of the human body. The rest is stored for when needed. Brown rice provides nearly a quarter of your daily requirement in one serving.

The human body is over 100,000 years old. In that time the body has developed an incredible defence mechanism called the survival instinct. In some cases it is miraculous. It is only in recent centuries that we have begun to refine our grains.

Recent researchers are maintaining that we ate few carbohydrates in the form of grain but I do dispute this. We would have eaten anything in our path that was in the least bit edible and certainly wild grains would have been a seasonal addition to the meat and fish that were hunted.

So our bodies spent the first 99,900 years eating whole-grains including rice. Wheat only came along about 10,000 years ago. During those many thousands of years our bodies evolved a very precise dietary support system that provided it with everything it needed to survive and be the fittest. It was essential for the survival of mankind that only the fittest made it through. This ensured that each generation was stronger.

If you go back to what I was saying about the loss of nutrients in the processing of brown rice to white rice you can perhaps understand why we are now facing the sort of medical problems that we are. We are depriving the body of not just a food group but the essential nutrients and energy that they provide.

You do not have to eat a plateful every day -for rice I would suggest two large tablespoons – it is actually very nice to have a cereal bowl of white rice with some warm milk and a banana for breakfast if you prefer a non-savoury option.

Brown rice needs to be prepared a little carefully – don’t get the easy cook as this has been partly processed. I suggest the real stuff, but put in a large glass bowl before cooking with cold water to cover it and whisk as hard as you can – then drain and then repeat until the water is clear. This gets rid of dust etc.

It takes a little more boiling than white rice and check after about 20 minutes until you get a slightly chewy and nutty tasting grain.

Use for any other dish that you would cook rice for. Curry, risotto, paella or mixed through a salad.

©sallycronin Just Food for Health 1998 – 2018

A little bit about me nutritionally.

A little about me from a nutritional perspective. Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 20 years ago. I qualified as a nutritional therapist and practiced in Ireland and the UK as well as being a consultant for radio. My first centre was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Here are my health books including a men’s health manual and my anti-aging book.

All available in Ebook fromhttp://www.amazon.com/Sally-Cronin/e/B0096REZM2

And Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sally-Georgina-Cronin/e/B003B7O0T6

Comprehensive guide to the body, and the major organs and the nutrients needed to be healthy 360 pages, A4: http://www.moyhill.com/html/just_food_for_health.html

Thank you for dropping in and if you have any questions fire away.. If you would like to as a private question then my email is sally.cronin@moyhill.com. I am only too pleased to help in any way I can. thanks Sally

 

13 thoughts on “Smorgasbord Health Column – Food in the News #Carbs – Don’t throw out the good ones!

  1. Pingback: Smorgasbord Health: Food News. Carbs. – The Militant Negro™

  2. Excellent info as always Sal. No surprise you and I both like a little wholegrains with our dinner lol. Sometimes I try to skip a side carb too for dinner. But no point eliminated food that is good for us, moderation is always key. 🙂 ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  3. You are right on track, as usual, Sally. I listened to a special talk on, YouTube, given by American medical doctors on their ideas about Diabetes 2, just today. They too advocate getting your carbs from any source apart from the white bread, wheat products. I love brown rice, never really liked white and grew up eating bannocks made from Beremeal, an Orkney grain which is one of the oldest grains. Thank you, Sally. xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  4. A great post, Sally. I love carbs and I eat a lot of them. Luckily it doesn’t seem to turn to fat for me. I have a great bread maker recipe for wholewheat bread. Brown rice, however, my view is life is to short to suffer through that [smile]. I love basmati.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Pingback: Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – With friends – William Price King, Paul Andruss, Carol Taylor, Esme, Billy Ray Chitwood and other brilliant writers. | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

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