Smorgasbord Blogger Daily #Reviews- Thursday August 16th, 2018 – Lucinda E. Clarke, Amy Reade and Teri Polen with Mae Clair

Welcome to today’s selection of blog posts that I have enjoyed and which I am sure you will too if you click the link to the original blog. The first post is from Lucinda E. Clarke’s blog and she introduces us to author Jane Bwye, who lived in Kenya for 45 years. Her love of Africa is at the heart of her books and in this post she shares the back ground to two of her novels.

Now I have hosted Jane before but she has a new book out this week and I want to share that news with you. (The fact that she says nice things about me has nothing to do with it – honest!) This is what Jane wrote.

THE AGONY OF REJECTION For Lucinda Clarke’s blog

Lucinda – thank you for hosting me today. I love your zany attitude to life and I admire your tenacity. It’s the only way to be in this world.

We both share a love of Africa, and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed living with you through your Amie books, savouring again the sights and sounds of the country I still call my home. Let me introduce your readers to my two Africa books, written more in traditional historical fiction style. Each one is a standalone, even though some characters are shared between them.

 

My first novel took me over thirty years to write – well, I admit that I started it in the mid 1970’s, and then family matters got in the way, so I had to put it on the back-burner until I came to live in the UK and wallowed in nostalgia. Then I suffered the agony of 72 rejections (and that didn’t count those agents/publishers who never bothered to reply). I was just about to give up, when I landed a publisher. Yes – persistence, does pay!

It was nominated for The Guardian First Book Award 2013 and has been compared with the works of Doris Lessing and Wilbur Smith.

Head over and find out more about Jane Bwye and her books as it makes for a fascinating read: https://lucindaeclarke.wordpress.com/2018/08/16/meet-jane-bwye/

Lucinda is an author in the Cafe and Bookstore.

Lucinda E. Clarke, Buy: http://www.amazon.com/Lucinda-E-Clarke/e/B00FDWB914
Website: http://lucindaeclarkeauthor.com

Please visit Amazon or Lucinda’s website to view all her books.

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Now time for author Amy Reade to share her research into habits. In particular to better understand how she can develop a more sustained ‘habit’ of writing every day. She shares some interesting research in to how habits are formed and I suggest you head over and check it out. Amy was the guest of P. J. Nunn Book Browsing

One of the things that’s been hardest for me as a writer is establishing a writing habit that allows me to write for a consistent length of time every day.

I learned the importance of routine—the hard way—when I had my first child. My opinion went something like this: she’s got the rest of her life to be shackled to a routine, so why shouldn’t she enjoy being a free spirit now?

Here’s how that turned out: she didn’t sleep through the night, she stopped taking naps at a shockingly young age, and we were both always exhausted and cranky.

At my wits’ end, I went to the library, checked out a book (I forget the name of it now) on helping toddlers to sleep through the night, and took the first piece of advice I came to: establish a routine at bedtime.

I did just that and you know what? Three nights later my daughter was sleeping through the night and we’ve never looked back.

I’ve been a fan of routine ever since. I love the routine of the school year, of extracurricular schedules, of work schedules, of mornings and evenings. I’ve learned that we are happiest and most comfortable when we’re adhering to a routine.

The same is true for many writers, and this writer in particular. Having a routine means that every single day, barring some calamity, I sit down in my chair and write.

But here’s where I struggle: I’m not always able to write at the same time. Sometimes I write in the morning, sometimes in the afternoon, once in a while at night. What I need is a writing habit that will help me increase my output and give me the extra time I need for marketing and promoting the books I write.

A habit, according to the website Routine Excellence, is “an action you do frequently and automatically in response to your environment.”

I’ve been doing some research into habits: how they’re formed and how long they take to form. I’m here to share some of that research with you.

First, how are habits formed?

Habits, once formed, are automatic; in other words, we engage in habits without thinking. We may brush our teeth right after breakfast every day, or we may grab our reusable shopping bags every time we go to the grocery store (this habit took me some time to establish). These things we do without thinking—they’re automatic—and they free up space in our brains for other thoughts.

Please head over and discover more about triggers, activity and rewards in regard to habit forming: https://bookbrowsing.wordpress.com/2018/08/11/establishing-a-writing-habit-by-amy-reade/

Amy is an author in the Cafe and Bookstore

Amy Reade, Buyhttp://www.amazon.com/Amy-M.-Reade/e/B00LX6ASF2
Blog: www.amreade.wordpress.com

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And I am ending on a review by Teri Polen for Cusp of Night by Mae Clair.

The truth hides in dark places . . .

Recently settled in Hode’s Hill, Pennsylvania, Maya Sinclair is enthralled by the town’s folklore, especially the legend about a centuries-old monster. A devil-like creature with uncanny abilities responsible for several horrific murders, the Fiend has evolved into the stuff of urban myth. But the past lives again when Maya witnesses an assault during the annual “Fiend Fest.” The victim is developer Leland Hode, patriarch of the town’s most powerful family, and he was attacked by someone dressed like the Fiend.

Compelled to discover who is behind the attack and why, Maya uncovers a shortlist of enemies of the Hode clan. The mystery deepens when she finds the journal of a late nineteenth-century spiritualist who once lived in Maya’s house—a woman whose ghost may still linger. Known as the Blue Lady of Hode’s Hill due to a genetic condition, Lucinda Glass vanished without a trace and was believed to be one of the Fiend’s tragic victims. The disappearance of a young couple, combined with more sightings of the monster, trigger Maya to join forces with Leland’s son Collin. But the closer she gets to the truth, the closer she comes to a hidden world of twisted secrets, insanity, and evil that refuses to die .

This story has everything that intrigues me – ghosts, mediums, seances, buried secrets. And that cover! I’ve read several other books by this author, and couldn’t wait to dive into this new series.

Head over and read the rest of Teri’s review for the book: https://teripolen.com/2018/08/16/cusp-of-night-a-hodes-hill-novel-by-mae-clair-bookreview-supernatural-mystery/

Both Teri and Mae are authors in the Cafe and Bookstore.

Teri Polen, Buy: https://www.amazon.com/Teri-Polen/e/B01MYOUA6V
Website: https://teripolen.com/

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Mae Clair, Buy: https://www.amazon.com/Mae-Clair/e/B009I61ND0
Website: https://maeclair.net/

Please visit Amazon or Mae’s website to view all her books.

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you will head over and check these posts out. thanks Sally.

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27 thoughts on “Smorgasbord Blogger Daily #Reviews- Thursday August 16th, 2018 – Lucinda E. Clarke, Amy Reade and Teri Polen with Mae Clair

  1. Thanks for including my research on habits in your post today! I just love the cover of Jane Bwye’s book and Mae Clair’s book sounds spooky and wonderful. I’ll be checking them out. You’re the best.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Update – Music, Cookery, Travel, Health and Books | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

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