Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New Book on the Shelves – psychological thriller – Hope by Terry Tyler

Delighted to showcase the latest release by Terry Tyler – a psychological thriller set in the future – Hope

About the Book

‘We haven’t elected a Prime Minister, we’ve elected a lifestyle’.

As the fourth decade of the 21st century looms, new PM Guy Morrissey and his fitness guru wife Mona (hashtag MoMo) are hailed as the motivational couple to get the UK #FitForWork, with Mona promising to ‘change the BMI of the nation’.

Lita Stone is an influential blogger and social media addict, who watches as Guy and Mona’s policies become increasingly ruthless. Unemployment and homelessness are out of control. The solution? Vast new compounds all over the country, to house those who can no longer afford to keep a roof over their heads.

These are the Hope Villages, financed by US corporation Nutricorp.

Lita and her flatmates Nick and Kendall feel safe in their cosy cyberspace world. Unaware of how swiftly bad luck can snowball, they suspect little of the danger that awaits the unfortunate, behind the carefully constructed mirage of Hope.

Terry Tyler’s nineteenth published work is a psychological thriller that weaves through the darker side of online life, as the gap between the haves and the have-nots grows ever wider. Whether or not it will mirror a dystopian future that awaits us, we will have to wait and see.

An early review for the book on Goodreads

Jun 04, 2019 G. Lawrence rated it five stars

I loved this book, and was just as equally disturbed by it. A chilling version of the future, which also contains the hope that compassion survives, despite the best efforts of some.

Ms Tyler has a gift for taking strands of the present and weaving them into a completely believable, and chilling, vision of the near future. A future where compassion and understanding, individuality and difference, are being slowly replaced by judgement and condemnation; where all people are stream-lined into a vision of “perfection” held by the few, and not for the reasons they say, but for commercial gain, for a world they want. It is a future where the poor are shunned, segregated and slowly destroyed, where the body, if it does not fit into the “right” size, is shamed. Products to bring about “perfection” are sold through fear (much as now) of not fitting in, not being perfect, not being enough.

This book condemns the ills of our present society and shows a terrifying vision of what happens when judgement replaces compassion. A world where kindness is dying, strangled by revulsion, where acceptance and variety are shamed rather than celebrated, where people are made into consumers, forced by shame and circumstance into a docile, helpless work force, making the few rich richer.

There were echoes of 1984 in the book, but brought up to date. A population kept under control by shame and fear, kept spending where they need to spend by the message that in order to be perfect (and only by being perfect will they have jobs, home, love) they must be a certain way, their lack of privacy sold to them as freedom, a “freedom” which is then used as a weapon against them.

And yet, for all this there is a real message of hope I saw at the end. Whilst evil continues on, so does the fight. Those willing to risk, those willing to stand up and question the system will encounter problems, life altering in many ways, but those voices count. Those voices stand up. Stand out. The war is not won in one go, and the book makes that clear. It is the battles that matter; standing up with a voice that is yours alone to say when something is not right. That, is the hope I took from the book. Hope has many meanings in the book, but the book ends with a hope that unlike the Hope Villages, is not fake, is not something packaged up with nothing solid inside. Hope is in people, in individuality, and is in the knowledge within us of what is right and wrong, and the courage to speak out against injustice. Hope is in human compassion, in love and in friendship. Hope is in us.

Buy the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07S89DK54

And on Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07S89DK54

A selection of books by Terry Tyler

Read the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Terry-Tyler/e/B00693EGKM

And Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Terry-Tyler/e/B00693EGKM

Read more reviews and follow Terry Tyler on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5821157.Terry_Tyler

About Terry Tyler

Terry Tyler is the author of sixteen books available from Amazon, the latest being ‘Patient Zero’, the third book in her new post apocalyptic series, which is a collection of stand-alone short stories featuring characters in the main novels. She is proud to be self-published, is an avid reader and book reviewer, and a member of Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team.

Terry is a Walking Dead addict, and loves history, winter, South Park and Netflix. She lives in the north east of England with her husband, a move that took place nine years ago from the beautiful Norfolk coast; she is still trying to learn Geordie.

Connect to Terry Tyler

Blog: https://terrytyler59.blogspot.ie/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TerryTyler4

Thank you for dropping by today and it would be great if you would share the news of Terry’s new book.. thanks Sally.

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14 thoughts on “Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New Book on the Shelves – psychological thriller – Hope by Terry Tyler

  1. Pingback: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Weekly Round Up – Are you making the most of this watering hole? Guests, stories, health, humour and other stuff | Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

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