Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #Potluck – Nonfiction Essay with Bonus | 7 Tips for Preserving Family Memories 2014 by Sherrey Meyer

Welcome to the series  Posts from Your Archives, where bloggers put their trust in me. In this series, I dive into a blogger’s archives and select four posts to share here to my audience.

If you would like to know how it works here is the original post: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/04/28/smorgasbord-posts-from-your-archives-newseries-pot-luck-and-do-you-trust-me/

This is the third post from the archives of writer Sherrey Meyer whose blog is titled Life in the Slow Lane. This week I have chosen a post about the preservation of family history, much of which is divulged in conversations with elderly members of the family. It is so important to discover and save this living hisory.

Nonfiction Essay with Bonus | 7 Tips for Preserving Family Memories 2014 by Sherrey Meyer

Today I am sharing with you a recent experience which started my husband and me thinking. Thinking about family, memories, storytelling, and how to share that history with the next generation. On the Meyer side of our family, the work is somewhat up-to-date. But who will carry the torch after our generation is gone? Our generation is slipping away slowly one by one. What about your family history?

She isn’t the sister I knew,” my husband says when he returns from driving his sister, Mary Ellen, home after lunch.

I don’t know what to say. I understand what his words mean. I still don’t know what to say.

This is the second sibling I have heard him make this comment about, the other a brother who died almost two years ago.

“As long as you can remember the good times, the days in Outlook, Mary Ellen seems to have good recall.” Words I use to encourage him.

In fact, it happened over lunch.

When Bob arrived to pick Mary Ellen up and bring her to our home, she asked her now routine question, “Have you been here before?

And the answer is always yes as one of us visits weekly, if not more. Since her assisted living community is only eight blocks away, we often make it our daily walk to visit.

But her short-term memory has lost its bearings.

We visit for a time, and then lunch calls us. It is our first time to sit with only the three of us around the table. Mary Ellen’s husband died a couple of months ago, and her move near us and a nephew is relatively recent.

We join hands for grace. Her skin has the feel of thin paper, and her hands are cold. It’s in the upper 80s outside.

We chat amiably while eating. Mary Ellen jokes about her unreliable memory, and we commiserate that our collective memories aren’t much better some days.

Bob recalls receiving an invitation recently from their grade school in Outlook, WA, a tiny space in the road in the Yakima Valley. He mentions the name of the woman who sent it and with whom he has talked. He asks Mary Ellen if she remembers Dorothy Cullen from their grade school days.

She looks up and furrows her brow. Finally, she says she doesn’t, her now nearly gone eyesight trying to focus on him.

And then she says, “Oh, there was a Dorothy Ross in Outlook.

Yes, this was the woman Bob was talking about but he had used her married name since he couldn’t think of her maiden name.

That recalled memory is from decades ago, but our visits with Mary Ellen recently have only been in the last two months. She doesn’t remember us visiting or others calling or coming by. She doesn’t remember her husband is dead.

We sit later that day talking about family and memories. Bob and I know with certainty that we too are growing older daily, and our memories aren’t always as sharp as they used to be.

Mary Ellen is the oldest of the six Meyer siblings and the genealogist in the family. She has researched, traveled, and visited with family members all over New England and the Midwest. Her travels include trips to cemeteries, old schools and churches, and the family history we have is amazing.

Not only that, Mary Ellen, a retired school teacher, is among the best storytellers in the family. Up until now, her mind was never faulty on a single detail about farm life, grade school teachers, preachers in the country church, music lessons, and life in tiny Outlook, WA.

But this record keeper and researcher is nearly blind, her mind is failing, and she turns 90 in a few weeks. Who will take up the torch and tread the course in keeping the family history and the stories moving generation to generation?

We haven’t been the best stewards of the Meyer history. At least the record of the Meyer clan is in many hands now, thanks to the Internet. But will it continue to spread as our family continues to grow?

We encourage our children to slow down, make treasured memories, memories that will last, and to write them down for future generations to read and share on and on. And we ask them to make sure they label photos on their Smartphones and computers with names, dates, places so someone will know a bit of the story held in the images decades from now.

Otherwise, a family’s legacy can be lost in time and age. 

A few tips readily came to mind in keeping the family history alive as Bob and I talked:

  1. Take advantage of every family gathering by encouraging time for storytelling and sharing experiences and have someone take notes.
  2. Make sure you keep up a family record of births, deaths, and weddings. This information will be helpful to whoever is in charge of maintaining the family genealogy.
  3. Mark photos with names, dates, places, occasions, and any other information benefit recall. Stories can be written from photos as the images are great triggers for recall and memory.
  4. Take advantage of state and county records in researching family records.
  5. Sites now exist that are also helpful in researching family Ancestry.com helped me uncover information on my father’s family; with three children tragically ending up in an orphanage in the early 1900s, I had almost given up hope of finding anything. Other genealogical sites include US GenWeb ,   US National Archives  Genealogy TodayUS Census Records  Ellis Island Records, and  Family Search (large database sponsored by the Mormon Church).
  6. When a family member passes on, and if you are able to do so, hang on to every slip of paper you might find among the individual’s effects. Recently, a search of the unemployment records in Nashville, TN for the years 1944-45 helped me confirm some information about my parents. I had found discharge slips issued to my parents from the same employer on the same date among my mother’s effects. But something just didn’t seem right. I checked and found I could get access to certain information about their unemployment. And I was right — my father’s service terminated a month after my mother’s.
  7. And lastly, I know that Mary Ellen was not shy about writing letters to people who had a similar last name and lived in an area where other family members had once lived, or who might have arrived at Ellis Island with ancestors, and these contacts provided the information she might not have uncovered otherwise.

It is never too late to begin tracking your family’s history. Whether you think you are a writer or not, you can write stories in a journal, on your computer, in a notebook, or by any method you choose.

Then pass what you have on to the next generation by sharing it with them from time to time so questions can be asked and answered. Leave it somewhere so when you are no longer around, it will be easily found and handed off to a family member.

This post isn’t intended to be about doom and gloom, but last Thursday’s lunch brought out the importance of what would happen to the Meyer family history now that Mary Ellen is no longer able to be the keeper of the work she so lovingly provided for us.

The tips here are some used in my research and gathered in talking with Mary Ellen over the years. I wanted to share this personal time in our life to provide, I hope, a clear picture of the importance of storytelling in the present.

©Sherrey Meyer 2014

About Sherrey Meyer

Sherrey Meyer, Blog Owner, Writer

Hi! I’m Sherrey, and I am a writer. I haven’t always been a writer but managed at all times to pursue my love of words through reading and writing. Sometimes I get so carried away with my love of words I also proofread and beta read for other writers.

I grew up the middle child but it doesn’t seem to have caused any difficulty in carrying out my roles as a wife, mother, grandma, and great-grandma. When opportunity provides, you’ll find me writing or reading. I love words!

My current work-in-progress is a memoir, the story of a Southern matriarch and how she ruled the roost with not so pleasant methods. On occasion, I have been lucky and written essays that actually were accepted for publication in anthologies.

My writing and proofreading experience reaches back to near age 12 when my publisher and printer father decided he needed some part-time help on several large government projects. He trained me to proofread and edit, and on weekends and during school holidays I had my own mini-office in my bedroom dedicated to my efforts.

Daddy was the source of my love of words. Words have always fascinated me, but life has inserted itself along the way. Now a retired legal secretary, where I used these skills, I now enjoy the time to focus on my passion for writing.

Connect to Sherrey

Blog: https://sherreymeyer.com/about/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Sherrey_Meyer
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SherreyMeyerWriter/
Published Work:https://sherreymeyer.com/published-work/writing-samples-published-works/

My thanks to Sherrey for permitting me to delve into her archives and share with you.. Please head over and enjoy browsing them yourselves. Sally.

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19 thoughts on “Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #Potluck – Nonfiction Essay with Bonus | 7 Tips for Preserving Family Memories 2014 by Sherrey Meyer

  1. Sally, thanks for sharing this post. It’s one I had almost forgotten writing. I must tell you that MaryEllen passed on a couple of years ago so this brought some more recent memories of her to mind as I read my own post. I love this series you are doing from our archives.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. I have been collecting stories from family. I am blessed with a treasure grove of old timers who are happy to convey stories and fill in gaps. It is a daunting task, but fascinating and affirming.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. My maiden aunt, Dad’s sister, was never a talker, perhaps these days she would be classed on a ‘spectrum’, but after her death a few pages summing up her life were found, obviously written a few years before she started getting dementia.As someone who had never talked much about her life it was enlightening and explained a lot about family stuff and her spirtitual life.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. This is a lovely post, Sherrey. I immediately started thinking about my mom, who spent the last five years of her life in an assisted living center. As her mind continued to deteriorate as her dementia progressed, my regular visits were harder. I think the hardest thing for me was that Mom forgot my Dad—a man she loved with all her heart for fifty-seven years. In fact, she often confused me for him.

    One of the things that went full circle in her life was that I began telling her the stories that she had said to me for years since she no longer remembered them. My mom also used to write down everything that was going on in her life in notebooks. I sometimes reread these passages to her until she fell asleep.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks for sharing that Pete. There is nothing harder than seeing a parent slip away mentally, but I like to think that there is still a spark and a bond that means that whilst they might not recognise us.. my mother thought I was her mother, they are calmer and happier when we are with them. That bond is still there just in another way. x

      Liked by 2 people

    • Pete, what a lovely way to honor your mother’s tradition of storytelling–a retelling to her of the stories she shared! One of my best memories of my mom during the last year of her life were visits where we dug into boxes of old photos. She might not recognize the newest members of our family, but there wasn’t an old black and white that she didn’t know every individual in the photo! The mind is an amazing creation.

      Thanks for sharing your story with us.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Pingback: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Weekly Round Up – Children’s books, Crooners, Cravings and Cartoons. | Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

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