Smorgasbord Blogger Daily – September 4th, 2019 – Jennie Fitzkee, Sue Vincent, Robbie Cheadle, James J. Cudney

A return of the Blogger Daily at least once a week.

It is an opportunity to showcase posts from around our community and the brilliant bloggers who share with us. It would be amazing if you would follow the links to the post I have highlighted and whilst visiting follow and support the blogger.

The first post is very timely as children and teachers return to school, and it is by Jennie Fitzkee, who shares the wisdom gained from over 30 years as a teacher of the youngest school children, preparing them for life and infusing their absorbent minds with a love of learning.

Finding Joy – A Letter to Teachers by Jennie Fitzkee

This is a re-post of a letter I wrote to teachers on Joy.
Joy is the magic word!

Dear Teachers,

As you start your new school year there is one word that will get you through the uncertainty and the worry. It’s the same word that is the heart of educating. That word is ‘joy’. No, it’s not the happiness that children bring. It’s the happiness that you bring because it inspires and ignites the mind and the heart of children. Yes, that’s how it works.

Children come to you with big eyes, looking at you to teach them. They don’t know what to think. They want to learn, yet what they really want is to be inspired to learn. That is where you can make a difference.

What do you like? Because whatever it is, from math to music, that ‘like’ will become your best buddy, your guiding star, and the foundation to teach all the things that you like. It will also become a portal to help you teach the things you may not enjoy. If you know that every day you have some window of time to teach what you love, then you become an educator. You go beyond teaching curriculum; you teach the child.

Do you like reading? Does Because of Winn-Dixie or Charlotte’s Web make your heart jump? Well, carry that book around and read it aloud on the playground, in the lunchroom, or at the bus stop. If this is your passion, children will know, and they will listen. They will learn.

Please head over and read the rest of this wonderful and inspiring post: https://jenniefitzkee.com/2019/09/02/finding-joy-a-letter-to-teachers/

Connect to Jennie – Blog: https://jenniefitzkee.com/ –  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jennie.fitzkee – Twitter: https://twitter.com/jlfatgcs

The next blog post is from Robbie Cheadle as a guest on the blog of Sue Vincent who incidentally loves guests and if you would like a fantastic place to showcase your blog and books then head over and find out more…

Robbie has recently been on tour of England and Scotland with some wonderful tales to share on her return.. This post is about the legendary Highwayman Dick Turpin.. but was he really that legendary… A snippet to whet your appetite and then click on the link to find out the truth.

The myth of Dick Turpin by Robbie Cheadle

Fiction writer, Harrison Ainsworth, glamourised thief and highway man, Dick Turpin, in his 1834 novel, Rookwood. The novel is set in England in 1737 at a manor house called Rookwood Place and the plot revolves around the mysterious death of the owner, Piers Rookwood, and the subsequent rivalry for inheritance of the property between his two sons.

During the course of the story, Dick Turpin, a highway man, is introduced at the manor under the pseudonym Palmer. During his stay, Palmer makes a bet with one of the other house guests that he can capture Dick Turpin. He is eventually forced to escape upon his horse, Black Bess. The horse, although fast enough to stay ahead of all the other horses, eventually collapses and dies from the stress of the escape.

In the novel, Ainsworth describes Turpin as galloping north in the dark: “His blood spins through his veins; winds round his heart; mounts to his brain. Away! Away! He is wind with joy.” Ainsworth’s depiction of Turpin, together with the local narratives, poems and ballads that resulted from it, gave Turpin a notorious posthumous status.

Head over to read the truth about Dick Turpin and don’t forget to check out the opportunity to guest post with Sue Vincent: https://scvincent.com/2019/09/02/guest-author-robbie-cheadle-dick-turpin/

A small selection of books by RobbieCheadle, Buy: https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/Goodreads: Robbie Goodreads

A small selection of books by Sue Vincent, Buy: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sue-Vincent/e/B00F2L730W – Blog: http://scvincent.com/  – Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6551588.Sue_Vincent

Finally today author James J. Cudney with a post on the subject of authors reviewing each other’s work… and also a request for your views on the subject.  I have read two of James’s books and have the rest on my TBR.. he had reviewed several of mine and I appreciate the perspective that another author brings to a review. I can recommend that you take him up on his author for this reciprocal support.

AUTHORS: Have You Read and Reviewed One of My Books?, by James J. Cudney

I ask this question specifically to authors because I want to be sure I’ve acknowledged and thanked any author who has taken the time to read and review one or more of my books. As a writer, part of my job is to see what other people think of my books. I check Goodreads, Amazon, BookBub, blogs, and social media daily to see any new reviews from any type of reader. If I’ve received a positive review, I always “like” it on the tool where the review was published. I rarely comment unless it’s on a blog post, as that’s more interactive to me. If I’ve received a bad review, I will cry. Okay, that’s not true… but it will make my day a bit worse. And I won’t like it. I’d rather the negative reviewer have an open mind and message me to discuss what they didn’t like.

ACTION ITEM: If there is an author who has reviewed my work, I would like to return the kind gesture. I generally use Goodreads to find reviews from authors, then pick one of his or her books to read and review within the next month. I can’t search every site or tool, so that’s what I use as my starting point to check for them. As of August 31st, I believe I’ve located all the reviews (not just those with a rating) and reciprocated by reading some of that author’s books too. If you’re an author, and you’ve reviewed my book, and I haven’t acknowledged it or reviewed one of yours, please let me know by responding to this post or privately. It’s accidental, and I want to be sure we’re supporting one another. Let me know, and I’ll correct it.

Head over and chat to James about reviewing each other’s work and also if you have reviewed one of James’s books, he would like to return the favour.. so opportunites for everyone.: https://thisismytruthnow.com/2019/09/03/authors-reviewing-each-others-books-have-you-read-my-work-yet

A small selection of James’s books  Buy: https://www.amazon.com/James-J.-Cudney/e/B076B6PB3M Website/Blog: https://thisismytruthnow.com/Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17128817.James_J_Cudney

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope that you will head over to read the posts in full – Until next time.. Sally

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40 thoughts on “Smorgasbord Blogger Daily – September 4th, 2019 – Jennie Fitzkee, Sue Vincent, Robbie Cheadle, James J. Cudney

  1. Pingback: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – New Author Interview, Music, Travel, Seasoning, Apple Coffee Cake and lots of other stuff | Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

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