Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore – New Author on the Shelves – #DarkHumour Someday Everything Will All Make Sense by Carol LaHines

A warm welcome to a new author on the shelves of the Cafe and Bookstore – Carol LaHines and her debut novel Someday Everything Will All Make Sense 

About the book

Someday Everything Will All Make Sense follows Luther van der Loon, an eccentric harpsichordist and professor of early music, as he navigates the stages of grief after the untimely death of his mother. Luther obsesses over burial practices, rails against the funerary industry, and institutes a personal injury suit against the Chinese takeout whose “sloppy methods” he blames for his mother choking on a wonton. Luther detests modern music and the equal temperament, the tuning fiction upon which it is based. He believes, like Kepler and the greatest thinkers of the Renaissance, that music is to be constructed according to the divine Pythagorean ratios.

One of the recent reviews for the book

DJ Stram 5.0 out of 5 stars Great writing and a memorable main character!  Reviewed in the United States on June 4, 2020

Carol LaHines has created a unique and realistic character, and I hope this book becomes a film so I can see Luther van der Loon on screen! Luther is a lovably neurotic medieval music professor whose mother dies eating takeout from their favorite Chinese restaurant when a rubbery won-ton becomes trapped in her throat. There were many surprises, and I found myself suddenly laughing loudly along the way as I turned the pages, wondering what would become of Luther without his dear mother.

Luther is not unlike those of us who have lost loved ones, but he is unlike anyone I know in his obsessive observations as he moves through his grief–very slowly.

If you love quirky characters and humor, this book will not disappoint. In addition to Luther, there are sub-characters who contribute to the dark humor. Piccolo Fabrizzi, a visiting music professor deserves his own book–plenty of rich character and so aptly described by the author.

If you are looking for intelligent writing, highly amusing characters, and ample humor, Someday Everything Will All Makes sense is a great fit!

Read the reviews and buy the book: Amazon US

And:Amazon UK

Read more reviews and follow Carol: Goodreads

About Carol La Hines

I am a life-long New Yorker. I went to New York University and St. John’s School of Law and now live in Tudor City, a charming neighborhood near the United Nations. I was a practicing musician and a lawyer before becoming a published author. While practicing law at a big law firm in New York City, I began writing fiction. I published short stories over a period of years, in journals like Fence, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Denver Quarterly, The Literary Review, Cimarron Review, redivider, Sycamore Review, and others.

Someday Everything All Makes Sense is my first published novel. I was able to mine my knowledge of the law and music theory in telling the story of Luther van der Loon, an eccentric harpsichord who has recently suffered the trauma of losing his mother. Luther is preoccupied with existential questions and questions concerning temperament, the mathematical ratios that govern how we hear music.

Like most of my writing, the novel might be characterized as tragic-comic. I believe, like the great Italo Calvino, that “lightness” — by which I mean to say a sense of playfulness leavening the serious — is a cardinal virtue of writing. (I love Calvino, Joyce, Nabokov, Woolf, Borges, Melville, Chekhov, Gogol, Pynchon, Cormac McCarthy, Sebald…

Connect to Carol

Author Page: Amazon US –  And: Amazon UK
Website: Carol LaHines
Facebook: Carol LaHines
Twitter: @CLahines

Thanks for dropping in today and it would be great if you could share the news about Carol and her book. Thanks Sally.

29 thoughts on “Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore – New Author on the Shelves – #DarkHumour Someday Everything Will All Make Sense by Carol LaHines

  1. What an intriguing idea for a novel, as a music lover, but not a musician, I am fascinated by the idea that music is both ethereal and and mathematical. I think I would enjoy meeting Luther and Piccolo.

    Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you, Janet! The music theory parts serve as an extended metaphor for Luther’s grief. There were very vigorous debates about music tuning during the Renaissance (it seems strange to think of it now!), that ultimately resulted in the adoption of an equal tempered tuning system. So Luther mourns the loss of all those shades in the aural spectrum much as he mourns the loss of his mother — his field is a dying, dwindling one as well (the music professor bits, esp. as they gather for their annual symposium, are some of the funniest parts of the book).

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Weekly Round Up – July 5th -11th 2020 – Josh Groban, Mango, Pigeons, Dublin 1944, Books, Health and Laughter | Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

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