Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives -Summer 2020- Pot Luck -#Travel -#Yellow – Exploring Sunny California and Arizona by Marsha Ingrao

Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives… and I will be picking two posts from the blogs of those participating from the first six months of 2020. If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

This is the first post from author and blogger Marsha Ingrao and this week Marsha takes us on the road with fellow blogger and photographer Terri Webster Schrandt. We then search for more yellow in Arizona and back to California with a nasty encounter with a raccoon… a very busy few days…and I am sure you will enjoy.

Exploring Sunny California

Meeting a blogger, and showing off the countryside, traveling with a friend – two of my favorite things to do. Taking pictures, it doesn’t get much better.

Meeting up with my blogging friend, Terri W. Schrandt made my week. We had such a great time hiking through the foothills in the Sierra Nevadas as we drove a short way into the Sequoia National Park.

Terri Webster Schrandt and Marsha Ingrao at Sequoia National Park looking for yellow.@Marsha Ingrao

What a joy it was to finally meet my blogger friend Terri. We don’t live too far apart now, but we are both moving in opposite directions, so I was super happy to spend a few hours with her.

Bear butt @Marsha Ingrao

The overwhelming impression you get from this picture is not yellow, but the golden hour sun warmed our skin and made our hair sparkle with yellow and strawberry highlights.

You can see the double/quadruple double yellow line in this shot, so you know that I stopped in the middle of the highway as the bear lumbered across. The car behind me didn’t honk and probably had his camera out and ready to go faster than I could find my phone and snap the picture.

The bear headed into the grass that nearly matched the color of the yellow lines. You can see a much better shot of the bear on Terri’s Sunday Stills post today.

Scouting the Housing Market in Prescott, Arizona

A mere two or three days before my friend Terri came to visit, I was gallivanting around Arizona, a mere nine hours and forty-one minutes away from home. My husband sent me on a house hunting trip, and my friend Patty Decker agreed to go with me.

Marigold bathroom in Prescott Valley, AZ model home -@Marsha Ingrao

Yellow must be the newest color in new housing. My friend Patti and I saw this stunning home called the Marigold in Prescott Valley in a development called Proghorn Ranch. We both wanted to unpack our bags and stay. The skies were clear and blue instead of dusty and the bathroom was golden.

In monsoon season it rains and cools off twenty or more degrees in the Arizona Desert. After a brief downpour, we enjoyed a relaxing yellow walk around the most artistic shopping mall in the country.

Bell tower in Tlaquepaque shopping mall. @Marsha Ingrao

In monsoon season it rains and cools off twenty or more degrees in the Arizona Desert. After a brief downpour, we enjoyed a relaxing yellow walk around the most artistic shopping mall in the country.

Javelinas on Parade @Marsha Ingrao

I thought these Javelinas on Parade display were cute, brightly painted pig statues, but no, they are not even related to the pig family. The Javelina (Tayassu tajacu) or collared peccary, are medium-sized animals that have short coarse salt and pepper colored hair, short legs, and a pig-like nose.

They look cute in the statues, but so do raccoons. So even though they are classified as herbivores, I don’t think I’d want to run into one in the middle of the night.

Back Home in Safe, Sunny California

Home again with the two legged-yellow squash picked this morning from my garden.@Marsha Ingrao

As these two yellow squash grew together, Terri slept peacefully in the cabana in the back yard. I had no clue that our tiny dog would incite the wrath of a mother raccoon when she went out at 3:30 in the morning. Terri woke and thought a band of coyotes were howling in the nearby foothills surrounding our house, but it was me screaming at the raccoon.

I overcame my yellow-squashy tendencies and rescued my dog with my coyote yelps and a swift kick to the raccoon’s mid-section. She then got off the top of my dog and stood up and started to lunge at me. I jumped back but not quite fast enough. She snagged me once with either teeth or claws, I couldn’t tell which. There was a yellow stripe going up my back. I was sure she was going to attack me again as we faced off, but she scurried away

My husband woke up when my poor dog screeched her way to the bedroom telling him how scared she had been. I zipped off to the hospital to get the necessary rabies and tetanus shots.

Thanks for reading my yellow stories, both the yellow stills and me still being yellow. Please check out more stories on Terri’s Sunday Stills, and enjoy Becky B’s July square photo challenge

©Marsha Ingrao

About Marsha Ingrao

Hi, my name is Marsha Ingrao. My husband, Vince and, our dog and three, no five cats live in Central California. Tulare County is the home of Agribusiness and the World Ag Expo.

Our house, BellaVista, nestles on an acre between several foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range with a straight-on view of Sawtooth Mountain. Ancient oak trees harvested by the Yokuts Indians line our street.

picture of our house in Central California

We are super proud of our little house, which we rescued from a bank nineteen years ago.

We pulled into the driveway and instead of weeds and peeling paint my husband saw potential. I believed in his vision. He redesigned it and together we’ve pieced it together into a work of art. It’s a living jigsaw puzzle.

If you could see down the road forty- minutes away, you would see the big trees in the Sequoia National Park. Discover more about Marsha, her career and family: About Marsha Ingrao

Marsha has written a history of Woodlake and the surrounding area

About the book

Known as the area “within the magic circle,” the Western town of Woodlake, along with its surrounding valley, is rich in both natural resources and hardworking citizens who are proud of their heritage. Most Tulare County towns sprang up along the Southern Pacific Railroad. Woodlake, designed as a tourist town, drew together farming communities, consisting of people too busy raising fruit and cattle to create a town. Starting with Thomas Henry Davis in 1853, settlers established farms and ranches, which attracted Los Angeles millionaire Gilbert Stevenson when he arrived in 1907. Approved by the Tulare County Board of Supervisors on October 3, 1911, the world-class tourist town named Woodlake grew from Stevenson’s imagination into reality. Led by the strong sales personality of its founder, Woodlake grew quickly, yet it remained a Western town, retaining reference points to the early communities that visitors would not find on signs. Visitors to Woodlake today will find Woodlakeans still doing what

Buy the book: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK – Website/Blog: TC History Gal – Facebook: TC History Gal – Twitter: @MarshaIngrao – LinkedIn: Marsha Ingrao

 Thanks to Marsha for allowing me to share her post and she would love your feedback.. thanks Sally.

 

If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

14 thoughts on “Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives -Summer 2020- Pot Luck -#Travel -#Yellow – Exploring Sunny California and Arizona by Marsha Ingrao

  1. I enjoyed reading this post again. And oye, those havelinas. Our friends in AZ live in Fountain Hills, and ever time we got together with them they had more stories about those javelinas that they so often find on their property and once in the garage coming out of the car late at night. I’d have had heart failure long ago, lol. They are to AZ what racoons are to us here, lol ❤ xx

    Like

  2. Raccoons may look cute, but they can be super aggressive at times. I’ve read stories of people feeding them nightly on their decks (never a good idea with wild animals). The raccoons learn quickly that this is a regular source of food. Then when the people are out for the night, the raccoons start trying to rip off the screen on the back door.

    Liked by 1 person

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