Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up November 21st – 27th 2022 – Author Interviews, Reviews, Chart Hits 1950s, Culinary A-Z, Tony Bennett, Podcast, Christmas Book Fair, Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed this week on Smorgasbord.

Hope you are all well and a busy week I am sure for those of you celebrating family Thanksgiving gatherings. I find it hard to believe it is December round the corner and another year coming to a close.

I have been out and about with Debby Gies this week on Tuesday for a Q&A which gave the new book a lovely boost… and she generously reviewed the collection too for her Sunday Book Review.

I have also been scheduling the Christmas and New Year archive posts and some wonderful contributions already. There are still some spaces left before the 15th of December and also after Christmas for any New Year Posts you would like to share.

Details are in this post: Posts from Your Archives – 2022 – Christmas and New Year Special

Contributor News this week.

William Price King joined me for The Breakfast Show for the next in the series on hits from the 1940s and the next post in the series about the wonderful performer Tony Bennett and his music in the 1970s and 80s.  You can also find William Blog– IMPROVISATIONWilliam Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies​ is here on Monday morning with the next post in her Spiritual Awareness series .. Over on her own blog apart from the two posts I have already linked to you can enjoy another Q&A with author Jacqui Murray. Follow the link to Debby’s posts D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor was be here on Wednesday with her  A-Z of food with the letter ‘L’…on her own blog you will find Monday Musings with a cautionary tale from Clive about scammers, and a kind promotion for Variety is the Spice of Life, A wonderful recipe for Red Thai curry with mushrooms as a delicious plant based meal, A look at edible flowers and a trip to the local market for some exotics that in Thailand are everyday foods. Head over to check the posts out CarolCooks2 weekly roundup…20th- 26th November 2022

Thank you too for all your visits, comments and shares during the week. As always very much appreciated…♥

 On with the show….

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 1950s – Bill Haley, The Platters, Frankie Lane and Pattie Page

William Price King meets the Music Legends – Tony Bennett – The 1970s and 1980s The Rollercoaster Years

Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘L’ is for Lamb, Lavender, Lemon/ Lime Meringue Pie, Liquorice and Liver…

Podcast – #Poetry #Flash Fiction – December and Sea Mist

Smorgasbord Blogger Weekly – November 27th 2022 – Pete Springer, Marcia Meara, D.G. Kaye, Anne R. Allen with Sue Coletta, D. Wallace Peach, Judith Barrow with M. J. Mallon, John Howell with Harmony Kent

#Mystery #Thriller Genuine Deceit by Joy York

Previous Reviews 2021- #Western #Romance – Tumblestar by Sandra Cox.

Previous Reviews from 2022 – #Christmas #Romance – Love, Me by Jacquie Biggar

Previous Reviews 2021 – #Children – Brody Cody and the Stepmother from Outer Space by Toni Pike

#Fantasy D.Wallace Peach, #Memoir D.G. Kaye, #Familysaga Judith Barrow

– #Poetry Colleen M. Chesebro, #SouthernCulture Claire Fullerton, #CrimeThriller Joan Hall

#Fantasy Dan Antion, #Biography John Cornelius Rogers and Sue Bavey, #SocialMedia #Cyberbullying Alex Craigie

#Shortstory Silent Night by Abbie Johnson Taylor

Christmas and New Year Special – Short Story, The Bike by D.L. Finn

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin November 22nd 2022- Thanksgiving food and Students

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin November 24th 2022 – Turkey Dilemmas and Betting slips

 

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week.. Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘L’ is for Lamb, Lavender, Lemon/ Lime Meringue Pie, Liquorice and Liver…


Welcome to a repeat of the series from Carol Taylor, the wonderful Culinary A – Z and a reminder, not only of the amazing variety of food we have available to us today from around the world, but delicious recipes to showcase them. Carol also introduces to cooking methods and kitchen equipment that assist in creating meals for all occasions.

Welcome once again to Carols Cooking Column and today in my culinary trawl we have the letter L.

Welcome to the next letter of the alphabet and I am starting with Lamb which is one of my favorite meats although not so easily available here.

Egyptian Lamb Flatbreads

Cold lamb is not very nice so we decided to make some flatbreads..a first for me and I was really pleased with how they came out..very quick and easy to make and a great use for the leftover lamb they made a change to shepherds pie. I now make my own bread and flatbreads all the time.

Ingredients:

• 1/2 cup water.
• 1/4 cup of milk
• 2 cups flour.
• 1 tbsp. Baking Powder.
• 2 tbsp. oil
• 1/2 tsp. salt.

Filling Mix

• 300 gm leftover cooked lamb…or you can use beef, pork or chicken.
• 1 lemon/lime finely zested.
• The juice half lemon/lime.
• 2 tsp. black pepper.
• 1 tsp. oregano or marjoram.
• 1 tsp. dried thyme
• I tsp. Paprika.
• 1 tbsp. cumin seeds, toasted.
• 2 eggs beaten.
• 1 tsp. sea salt…
• 4 Spring onions finely sliced.

Let’s Cook!

To make flatbreads.

Sift dry ingredients together. Add liquids and mix thoroughly…I used my food processor and it took literally 2 mins…. if that and formed a ball. If it is too sticky add little more flour. Divide into 8 pieces. Flatten with the heel of the hand and roll out very thin.
My first attempt at this and I didn’t roll mine out thin enough to start with.

Heat pan and cook 2/3 minutes each side turn over with tongs or fish slice and done… finito…ready to fill…easy peasy.

Lamb Filling.

Chop lamb into rough little chunks and pieces. Put in large bowl with lemon zest and squeeze half of the lemon juice into the mix. Add all your spices, the eggs, salt and pepper and most of the spring onions and retain some for garnishing. Mix together thoroughly.

Lay out the flatbreads and cover half with filling, then fold over and press together. You get half-moon shape.

Get 2 large baking trays and rub one with Olive oil. Lay the flatbreads on the oiled tray, lightly rub other tray and pop this on top of flatbreads. Put trays into the preheated hot oven and cook 6-8 minutes. This way the flatbread will get lovely and crispy on top. If you have small trays you may need to do in batches.

Depending on the size of the flatbreads cut in two …I left mine whole as I served individually (see picture) and not on a large serving plate but for a party or just because you want to….. serve on one dish with Humous.

Larding.

Larding is the cooking technique of inserting strips or pieces of fat into a piece of meat that doesn’t have much fat of its own.

Fat is important in cooking, as it melts and keeps the meat from drying out.

Back in the last half of the 1900s, people didn’t need to do larding very much, as farmers had worked to breed animals with better marbling in their meat. No sooner had that been achieved, however, than consumers changed their minds and wanted “fat-free” meat, and wouldn’t purchase meat that had much or any marbling in it. Consequently, farmers are going back to breeding meat that doesn’t have much fat of its own, and we have almost reached the point that we have to start larding again.

Some meats, such as venison, have always been larded as Venison is very lean meat.

Often lard (pork fat) is used, but if you are doing beef you would want to use beef fat to “lard” your beef with.

Lemon/ Lime Meringue Pie

I seemed to be making a lot of recipes lately which require egg yolks thus leaving me with a glut of egg whites. I haven’t made a lime meringue pie before but as we get more limes here than lemons it made sense to do so… Make a pastry case using either your own tried and tested recipes or following mine.

Make the shortcrust pastry.

I use half fat to flour so for example for 8oz of flour I use 4oz of fat.

The flour is not same here and very recently when I was comparing items from the UK against the US….I made some startling discoveries of the differences and it has made an instant difference to my cooking especially my pastry…. I will say no more but I had a silent rant!

Again I cannot get the same cooking fat so I use an olive oil based fat and crispo. For this sort of pastry when I want a nice soft pastry I used 1/3 olive oil fat and 2/3 crispo.

And cake flour, not all purpose flour, and the difference was remarkable…….mmmm I am still silently ranting…lol

Prepare your pastry making sure you use ice cold water from the fridge and wrap in clingfilm and put in the chiller for at least 20 minutes.

Roll out and line a pie plate or dish.

Some prebake at this point and some don’t …I have done both depending on the time I have or just how I feel.

If I don’t prebake I stand the dish on a baking tray so as to make sure there are no “soggy bottoms”

For this pie, I pre-bake the pie case…I cook the pie case on 190 degrees for about 25-30 mins if you just lightly scrape the edge of the pie it should just flake away.

Now let’s make the filling…

• 1 1/2 cups of sugar
• 1/2 cup cornstarch
• 1/2 cup water
• 1 egg yolk
• 1/2 cup fresh lime juice or lemon juice
• 2tsp butter at room temperature
• 1 cup boiling water
• 2tsp lime zest.

Let’s Cook!

  1. Combine sugar, cornstarch, water, and lime juice. Whisk until smooth.
  2. Stir in butter and egg yolks. Then gradually add boiling water.
  3. Bring mix to the boil, reduce heat and simmer for 5 mins.
  4. The mix should be fairly thick and glossy, if you want to add green coloring at this point then you can. I didn’t so add so my filling was a lemon color because of egg yolks.
  5. Pour into the pre-baked pastry case.

Meringue Topping

• 3 Egg whites
• 3/4 cup sugar.

Let’s Cook!

  1. Beat egg whites until stiff peaks.
  2. Add half of the sugar and beat until stiff and then fold in rest of sugar.
  3. Put on top of lime/lemon filling and make sure edges are sealed.
  4. Bake in preheated oven on 175 until top is golden. About10 mins.

Liver.

This lovely spicy chicken liver dish is very easy and quick to make…. In Thai, it translates to Pad Ped Kuang Nai Gai Tua Fuk Yaao. Try saying that after a few glasses of wine.

This dish is a family favorite, even hubby eats it and he doesn’t really do spicy but I think his love of liver takes over.

Ingredients:

• 350 gm Chicken Livers
• 4 or 5 long green beans.
• 1 tsp. Red curry paste….. depending on the red curry paste you use you may need to add more…I use a locally made one which blows your head off …so only use a tsp. and it is still hot!
• 1-2 tbsp. Fish Sauce.
• 6/8 Lime leaves very finely sliced.
• 4 tbsp. Coconut Milk.
• A small amount of coconut oil.

N.B You can use oil of your choice I just always cook with Coconut oil.

Let’s Cook!

  1. Clean and cut up chicken livers…I do bite-size pieces.
  2. Cut up long beans into half-inch long pieces.
  3. Finely shred lime leaves…..I roll them and shred.
  4. Heat Pan over fairly high heat, add a small amount of oil, add chili paste and 1 tbsp Fish sauce stir until paste is liquid, add finely sliced lime leaves and chicken livers, stir until the liver is just cooked.
  5. Add the green beans and coconut milk and cook gently for 2/3 mins.
  6. Taste and add more fish sauce if required…I generally add about another half tbsp.
  7. It is now ready to serve..this is quite a dry dish so can be served with a small bowl of miso soup with chopped spring onions if liked.
  8. Serve with steamed rice.

Lassi.

Lassi is a popular traditional dahi-based drink that originated in the Indian subcontinent. It is a blend of yogurt, water, spices and sometimes fruit. Traditional lassi is a sweet-savory drink, sometimes flavored with ground and roasted cumin.

Lemongrass.

A tall tropical grass the fresh stalks and leaves have a clean lemonlike odor because they contain an essential oil, which is also present in lemon peel. Used extensively in Asian cooking and it is a spice which I love Lemongrass is a long thick grass with leaves at the top and a solid portion several inches long at the root end. The lower portion is sliced or pounded and used in cooking. As a spice, fresh lemongrass is preferred for its vibrant flavor but is also sold in dried form. The dried spice is available in several forms: chopped in slices, cut and sifted, powdered,

Longan.

A popular fruit here in Thailand in season Longan is sold everywhere markets and street corners…Thais love it…

Longan fruit also referred to as “euphoria fruit,” grows on an evergreen tree and is related to the lychee. Both are a translucent white beneath a somewhat soft and nut-like exterior. The longan, however, has a light brown shell and a central hard, glossy black seed that has the appearance of an eye. The Chinese call this fruit “dragon eye.”

The flavor of the longan is described as being somewhat like that of the lychee only sweeter and more grape-like. Longan Honey is also very nice and healthy and honey I buy fresh whenever I can.

Liaison.

A liaison in cooking is a binding agent. It could be bread or flour but generally, it is almost always especially in professional kitchen cream and egg yolks. Classically it is 3 egg yolks per cup/8oz/250ml of cream which are mixed together and then a small amount of the hot soup.stew is added a little at a time (we don’t want) scrambled eggs do we? then once the temperature of the liaison has raised which is called ” tempering” the mixture is poured into the soup or stew.

If using flour then mix the flour with a little cold water first before you add the hot mix and temper it.

Leeks.

Leeks, like garlic and onions, belong to a vegetable family called the Allium vegetables. Since leeks are related to garlic and onions, they contain many of the same beneficial compounds found in these well-researched, health-promoting vegetables.

Fresh leeks should be stored unwashed and untrimmed in the refrigerator, where they will keep fresh for between one and two weeks. Wrapping them loosely in a plastic bag will help them to retain moisture.

Tips for preparing Leeks.

Cut off green tops of leeks and remove outer tough leaves. Cut off the root and cut leeks in half lengthwise. Fan out the leeks and rinse well under running water, leaving them intact. Cut leeks into 2-inch lengths. Holding the leek sections cut side up, cut lengthwise so that you end up with thin strips, known as the chiffonade cut, slicing until you reach the green portion.

Make sure slices are cut very thin to shorten cooking time. Let leeks sit for at least 5 minutes before cooking.

Leeks can be used in soups, stews, they can be stuffed there are numerous recipes using leeks…Just make sure that you wash them thoroughly as they tend to have their growing soil between each layer.

Liquorice.

Liquorice (British English) or licorice (American English) is the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra from which a sweet flavor can be extracted. The liquorice plant is a herbaceous perennial legume native to southern Europe and parts of Asia, such as India.

Liquorice flavours are used as candies or sweeteners, particularly in some European and Middle Eastern countries.

Liquorice is a chewy, dark-brown or black sweet flavored with liquorice root extract. Common variations include bootlaces, all-sorts (which are bound by colored sugar paste) and regional confections such as Pontefract cake and Yorkshire pennies (shiny black discs that are distinguished by the small castle and owl image stamped on one side).

In Denmark and Norway, salted liquorice is more common than the sweet variety popular in Britain. I remember as a kid we used to get very small liquorice sweets like little pips…called imps I think? and also one which I am assuming was the root and it was really chewy…Does anyone else remember those???

I know many chefs are now using liquorice in cakes and savory dishes I haven’t tried it…I love the sweet liquorice but do think it is a bit like Marmite you either love or hate it…

Licorice extracts have been used in herbalism and traditional medicine.

Lavender.

Lavender is a herb native to northern Africa and the mountainous regions of the Mediterranean and is also grown for the production of its essential oil, which comes from the distillation of the flower spikes of certain lavender species.

The lavender essential oil is toxic when swallowed.

The oil has cosmetic uses, and it is believed to have some medicinal uses.

Can you use lavender in cooking?

Lavender flowers are most commonly used in dessert recipes, but some professional cooks are finding it is also an outstanding addition to savoury recipes. Like rosemary, lavender can add a robust flavor to roasted meats and is especially good with lamb.

Again I haven’t used lavender in cooking but I think maybe I will soon…Has anyone else used lavender in cooking?

Lotus Root

A popular vegetable here in Thailand …with a creamy and starchy texture that’s similar to taro root. Lotus seeds can be boiled and added to dessert soups or ground to make lotus seed paste, a common ingredient in sweets like mooncakes and daifuku. Though not as widely available, even the petals and leaves of the lotus plant are edible.

The first time I came across the seeds were when we visited the Red Lotus Lake here where I live I was then able to join the dots as I had seen the seed pods being sold at the roadside and on the markets but didn’t know what they were…

The lotus root can be found sunk into the mud of a pond or river bottom and the lotus root is actually the stem of the plant. Growing as long as four feet, the stems rise out of the water and ends in the elegant flowers that are so revered in Buddhist and Hindu cultures. Even in harsh temperatures, lotus flowers maintain a fairly precise temperature range, which is perhaps why the Chinese call lotus root a “cooling” food, consumed to restore balance to the body.

Thank you for reading I hope you have enjoyed this little trip through the Culinary alphabet…Until next time when it will be the letter M.

About Carol Taylor

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetables ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use have to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: Amazon US

Connect to Carol – Blog: Carol Cooks 2 – Twitter: @CarolCooksTwo – Facebook: Carol Taylor

 

My thanks to Carol for creating this wonderful series and we hope that you have enjoyed. As always we are delighted to receive your feedback and if you could share that would be great.. thanks Sally.

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Weekly Round Up – 14th – 20th November 2022 – New Book, Tony Bennett, Hits of the 40s, Spiritual Awareness, Christmas Book Fair, Podcast, Health, Bloggers and Funnies


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed this week on Smorgasbord

I hope you are all well and I am sure a busy time for those you preparing for Thanksgiving with family and friends.Wishing you a very Happy Holiday.

We celebrated are 42nd anniversary this week with lunch out at a local hotel and enjoyed a very nice meal. You will also find a special edition of the funnies in the Laughter section.

My latest WIP reached the point of no return and was published on Friday… today the ebook and paperback came together so I decided to do my promotion this morning. I hope you will pop in to the post to find out more about it.

Follow the link: Variety is the Spice of Life: A Blend of Poetry and Prose

There is a special series of Posts from your Archives for the Christmas and New Year season and if you would like to share one of your posts with us, then here are all the details along with one of my Christmas themed stories to give you an idea of how it will look. I have already scheduled 10 fantastic posts from authors who are participating and look forward to hearing from you. Don’t forget to look at your January posts too as this goes through to 2023.

Posts from Your Archives – 2022 – Christmas and New Year Special

Contributor News this week.

William Price King joined me for The Breakfast Show for the next in the series on hits from the 1940s and the next post in the series about the wonderful performer Tony Bennett and his music in the 1960s.  You can also find William Blog– IMPROVISATIONWilliam Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies​ was here on Monday morning with the next post in her Spiritual Awareness series on Angels… Over on her own blog you can enjoy Debby’s Sunday Book Review for Do What You Love by Marjorie Mallon also a wonderful selection of useful writer’s links, a poem from the heart and her latest podcast, Grief the Real Talk Follow the link to Debby’s posts D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor will be here on Wednesday with her  A-Z of food with the letter ‘L’…on her own blog you will find a fabulous recipe for Christmas Pudding, a poignant Remembrance Day post, a recipe for Thai Panang Chicken Curry, some great healthy eating options and you can join Carol on her visit to her local market with amazing fresh produce. Head over to check the posts out Carol Taylor’s Weekly Round Up

Thank you too for all your visits, comments and shares during the week. As always very much appreciated…♥

 On with the show….

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 1950s – Nat King Cole, Big Joe Turner, Mel Blanc, Vera Lynn

William Price King meets the Music Legends – Tony Bennett – The 1960s Posted on November 18, 2022

Spiritual Awareness – Decoding Sequenced Angel Messages in Numbers by D.G. Kaye

Thanksgiving and Strawberry Jam by Sally Cronin

Winterise your Body – Influenza by Sally Cronin

Smorgasbord Blogger Weekly – November 19th 2022 – Staci Troilo, Darlene Foster, Dorothy Grover-Read, Judith Barrow with Phil Rowlands, Cheryl Oreglia, Robbie Cheadle with Daniel Kemp

Smorgasbord Christmas Book Fair 2022 – #Poetry – Annette Rochelle Aben, Harmony Kent, Bette A. Stevens.

#Mystery Noelle A. Granger – #Caravans #Dogs Jacqueline Lambert, #History Paulette Mahurin

#Anthology – Distant Flickers: Stories of Identity & Loss

Previous Reviews 2021 – #Psychological #Mystery- House of Sorrow: Legends of Madeira by Joan Hall

Previous Reviews 2021- #Children’s #Fairies – The Tree Fairies by D.L. Finn

Previous Reviews 2021- #Contemporary – Matilda Windsor Is Coming Home by Anne Goodwin

42nd Anniversary Edition – Marriage – Hosts David and Sally Cronin

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Grandpas and Hell Freezing Over

 

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week… Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – November 7th – 13th 2022 – Remembrance,1940s hits, Tony Bennett, Foods ‘K’, Far East 1946, Podcast, Book Reviews, Health and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed this week on Smorgasbord.

I hope you have had a great week. I know that some of you in Florida and adjacent states have been in the path of the latest hurricane and that caused extensive damage along the coast. Hopefully you have not suffered too much damage and that there is some respite from the weather fronts. We have had extremely high winds and torrential rain this week but we are lucky to only get the tail ends of the big storms across the Atlantic here on the East Coast, whilst those in the West of Ireland get the brunt of them.

The annual remembrance services have been held this week in the UK on November 11th and today with Rembembrance Sunday. Around the world veterans and those who did not return are remembered at different times of the year. My post this year is a tribute to an extraordinary marine who I was honoured to interview a few years ago. His story and those of the many thousands of wounded servicemen and women is one that needs to be told and thankfully there are some amazing charities who support them as they face the challenges of returning home with life changing injuries of the body and mind.

Remembrance Sunday and Veterans Day – For those who died and those that returned

Contributor News this week.

William Price King joined me for The Breakfast Show for the next in the series on hits from the 1940s and the next post in the series about the wonderful performer Tony Bennett.  You can also find William Blog– IMPROVISATIONWilliam Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies​ is here on Monday morning with her next post in her Spiritual Awareness series on Angels… Over on her own blog you can enjoy Debby’s Sunday Book Review for  Well Behaved Wives by Amy Sue Nathan also the final day of the book launch for the fabulous The Necromancer’s Daughter by D. Wallace Peach.  Follow the link to Debby’s posts D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor was here on Wednesday with her  A-Z of food with the letter ‘K’…on her own blog you will find news on Climate Change and COP27, some healthy options for breakfasts and how to navigate the treats over Christmas.  Also some edible roots I had not come across but sound delicious and here is the link for Carol’s Christmas Post The holidays and how to plan for social evens.

Thank you too for all your visits, comments and shares during the week. As always very much appreciated…♥

 On with the show….

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 1940s – Ella Fitzgerald, Peggy Lee, Frank Sinatra, Perry Como

William Price King meets the Music Legends – Tony Bennett – The 1950s

Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘K’ for Kale, Ketchup, Kippers and Kanom Moo Krob (Crispy Pork and Kale)

#Poetry #Flash Fiction – A Cat’s Life and Life’s Greatest Gift by Sally Cronin

HMS Triumph 1950.jpg

#Memoir – Life on the Ocean Wave – Part Six -Malta and the Far East 1946 – Eric Coleman

Winterise your Body – Nothing more common than a cold…by Sally Cronin

Smorgasbord Blogger Weekly – November 7th 2022 – Pete Springer, Judith Barrow with Jane Risdon, Patty Fletcher, Robbie Cheadle, John Howell.

New Book on the Shelves and Advance Review – #Thriller #Mystery The Girl from Belgrade by John L. DeBoer

Previous Reviews 2021- #Paranormal #Thriller – Blood Mark by JP Mclean

Previous Reviews 2021 – #Memoir – Flashes of Life: True Tales of the Extraordinary Ordinary by Pamela S. Wight

Previous Reviews 2021- #Poetry – Behind Closed Doors: A Collection of Unusual Poems by Robbie Cheadle

Previous Reviews 2021 – #History – Transylvania’s History A to Z: 100 Word Stories by Patricia Furstenberg

#Fantasy #Horror Calloway Falls by J. M. Murphy

Host Malcolm Allen November 2022 – Hairdressing and Reservations

Extra Rewind – November 2022 – Another Open Mic Night with author Daniel Kemp

 

Thanks very much for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week… Sally

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘K’ for Kale, Ketchup, Kippers and Kanom Moo Krob (Crispy Pork and Kale)


Welcome to a repeat of the series from Carol Taylor, the wonderful Culinary A – Z and a reminder, not only of the amazing variety of food we have available to us today from around the world, but delicious recipes to showcase them. Carol also introduces to cooking methods and kitchen equipment that assist in creating meals for all occasions.

Welcome once again to Carols Cooking Column and today in my culinary trawl we have the letter K.

K seems to lend itself too much which is Asian unless I revert to the German Language where our C is often replaced with a K…However not in many culinary dishes so I drew a bit of a blank there…

Kippers, I remember that smell very well as a child my dad loved Kippers, So what is a Kipper?

A kipper is a whole herring, a small, oily fish, that has been split from tail to head along the dorsal ridge, gutted, salted or pickled, and cold-smoked over smouldering woodchips (typically oak).

In the British Isles and a few North American regions, they are often eaten for breakfast. In Great Britain, kippers, along with other preserved smoked or salted fish such as the bloater were also once commonly enjoyed as a high tea or supper treat, most popularly with inland and urban working-class populations before World War II.

My abiding memory is the bones and the smell you can imagine a fussy child picking all those little bones out.and screwing up her nose..lol

Kaffir Limes

I have used the leaves in many of the Thai dishes that I cook they are used in many Asian dishes…The trees are small evergreen trees and prickly. The one I had was quite a young one and I had not seen any fruit…It wasn’t until a neighbor gave me some of the fruit that I put two and two together and realized that was the fruit of the tree I had growing in the garden and now we do have fruit.

The rind is very bumpy unlike the normal limes I use and when cut open the flesh is quite dry and what juice there is has an acidic, bitter and is very strongly sour tasting.
A complete contrast to the zest which is quite aromatic.

A little zest goes a long way and very finely chopped or added to ingredients it imparts a beautiful citrus flavour. I have added a little video as there is a knack for chopping the lime leaves very finely. You need a really sharp knife and it is an art…

Here in Thailand, it is also pounded in a pestle and mortar as it is an ingredient in many curry pastes it is added to the iconic Tom Yum Soup and other soups and stews here and also is an ingredient in Thai Shrimp Cakes

Nutritionally the benefits of the Kaffir Lime is from the oils in the rind and the high levels of citronella and limonene which are both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory.

Oil extracted from the leaves is also used for medicinal purposes, it is mixed into shampoos, soaps salves and fragrances.

Most often it is used in oral products or the leaves can be rubbed directly onto the gums as it eliminates harmful bacteria in the mouth.

In the rural areas and villages, you will find many herbs, fruits and vegetables are used like this to help alleviate and cure many ailments as many either are to far away to visit the doctor or cannot afford to or even just prefer to use remedies passed down through the generations.

It is also used as an insect repellent by mixing the juice or oil with a lotion or salve and it reduces the chance of being bitten.

I hope you have enjoyed learning about the Kaffir Lime…Do you use Kaffir lime or its leaves ????

Ketchup.

A thick, sweet sauce made with tomatoes, vinegar, sugar, salt, and spices. It is also known as catsup and catchup. It is said to be derived from “fet-tsiap,” a spicy pickled fish condiment popular in China.

Ketchup was first mentioned in print in 1711. Most American ketchup is made with tomatoes. The F. & J. Heinz Company of Pennsylvania sold the first bottled tomato ketchup as of 1876.

Kaki aka Persimmon

A fruit which I have seen and never bought until a little while ago…Why? I just haven’t but I saw it mentioned in a few recipes which prompted me to try it…

Kaki (Persimmon) is in season here now and I have to admit not a fruit I had tasted… seen never tasted but this week we did my daughter-law hadn’t tasted it either so we bought some and it is lovely the texture of a crisp apple fairly sweet but very nice.

The persimmon is one of the classical fruits of China, from where it was introduced in ancient times to Japan. Mainly grown in China and Japan commercially but smaller growers have developed in Italy, Israel, Brazil, California (U.S.A.), Australia and New Zealand. In South-East Asia, it is grown on a limited scale in Java, Sumatra, Malaysia and Northern Thailand. At present grown by hill tribe growers here in Northern Thailand.

Production has been slow to cultivate and they are mostly sold as fresh fruit which is probably why by comparison with other fruits they are expensive.

Kielbasa (kihl-BAH-sah) – Kielbasa is a smoked sausage made from pork. Sliced and eaten with cheeses and olives.

Kale.

Love it or hate it but there is no denying the health benefits that this humble vegetable contains. I know many of you dislike Kale, but I love kale, although I do not love kale in a smoothie. Well, for those of you who buy greens powders at some expense so I am told … Dehydrate those tough outer leaves that you would normally throw away and turn them into a greens powder to add to your morning smoothie or sprinkle on your salads…

A great money saver…

Just a question when I lived in the UK the kale was what we called curly Kale the kale here is like the one pictured I haven’t seen curly kale here. What kale do you get curly or straight ???

One of my favorite kale recipes

Kanom Moo Krob (Crispy Pork and Kale)

Ingredients:

• 2 Belly Pork Strips.
• 8 Large leaves of Kale.
• 3/4 cloves Garlic. squashed with the flat blade of a knife.
• 2/3 birds eye chilies.
• 2 tbsp Oyster Sauce
• 1 tbsp Soy Sauce
• 2/3 shakes of Maggi Sauce.
• Half tbsp. Oil.

Let’s Cook!

  • Cook Belly Pork in the oven until tender and crispy for about 30 mins.
    I normally cook on about 180/200 degrees to start and then reduce heat slightly to 160 degrees. When the pork is tender turn up the heat to crisp the pork. When nice and crispy remove the pork from the oven and chop into bite sized pieces.
  • Heat the wok or large fry pan and add half tablespoon oil.
  • Add crushed garlic and chilies, add little hot water and cook for 1 minute, at this point the chilies may overpower you, ha ha, turn on expel fan and add chopped Kale.
  • Stems first if you are using them as they take longer to cook. I use stems of Kale also if they are quite a thick slice into 2-inch pieces.
    No waste from this kitchen…
  • Cook for 2 mins and add remainder of Kale leaves and turn over a few times ….I use fish slice as I find it easier to just turn kale over.
  • Add 2 tbsp Oyster Sauce and 1 tbsp Soy along with few shakes of Maggi (seasoning Sauce).
  • Taste and adjust if necessary. Cook for further 2 to 3 minutes.
  • Add crispy Pork turn or stir a few times to mix.
  • Check the seasoning again and serve with steamed rice.

Enjoy!

Kosher food.

The word kosher means “fit or proper.” It refers to food that is proper for the Jewish people to consume as set out in the laws of Kashrut (the kosher dietary laws) in the Old Testament.

Knead.

The process of working dough by mixing, stretching, and pulling. Kneading is most often used in bread dough and is a necessary step in order to develop the gluten.
To knead, gather your dough into a ball.Using the heel of your hands, press down on the dough. Pull up the part of the dough that was flattened by your hands and fold it back over on itself. Keep repeating the process, turning the dough periodically.

Kugel

Koogel means “ball” or “Cannonball” in German. This name evolved because of the small round pot in which such puddings used to be cooked. This round, covered pot would be placed in the larger pot of cholent a slow-cooking stew of chunks of meat, marrow bones, beans, barley, potatoes. Classic ones are made with noodles or grains (sometimes even leftover bread). They often have a sweet ingredient such as raisins or apples, but some are savory. Today, they are even made with a variety of vegetables in a style reminiscent of quiche or casseroles.

What is characteristic of all of them, though, is that they are made without water, using fats and/or eggs to bind the ingredients.

Khao Soi

Originating from Northern Thailand there are many versions of this dish but all revolve around soft and crispy noodles with spicy yellow curry…

Khao Soi originated from here in the North and holds almost iconic status..said to originate from the Chiang Mai area the name means ” cut rice” in Thai although it is thought the word originates from the Burmese word for noodles and is a corruption of the word Khao swe.
It is also my all time favourite Thai curry I eat it at every opportunity.

Khao gle at

Are traditional handmade Thai pancakes and I was very lucky to see them being made a real family affair.

Kidney Beans

Red kidney beans are the most common kidney bean. These large beans have a dark red color, glossy skin and firm texture, making them suitable for soups, stews, chilies, and other dishes that cook for a long time.

The white Kidney bean also known as cannellini beans are large, with a thin, white skin and a subtle flavour.These beans are more suitable for salads and dishes that require a shorter cooking time.

Kinilaw Cuisine.

Kinilaw cuisine is a true Philippine cuisine with influences as far back as pre-colonial times with trans-Pacific trade and exchanges of culture. Links later in the 16th century with Europe and South America through Spanish colonists had the most tremendous impact on today’s Philippine cuisine. This merging of culinary heritages must be described and considered as a real “fusion cuisine.” to what has become today’s Philippine cuisine.

Anything alive and anything fresh can be used for Kinilaw cuisine (crustaceans, fish, meat, vegetables, fruit, flowers, insects, fowl, and snakes; food as rare and unusual as balatan (sea cucumber), lima lima (spider conch), kohol (river snail), abatud (larva of coconut beetle), butbut (sea anemone), guso (seaweed) goat, carabao, venison, wild boar, heart, liver, tripe, animal skin, Puso ng saging (banana core) and to name some many of which are local ingredients. It is pretty similar to Thai Cuisine where you will get regional differences to the same dish.

Thank you for reading I hope you have enjoyed this little trip through the Culinary alphabet…Until next time when it will be the letter L.

About Carol Taylor

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetables ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use have to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: Amazon US

Connect to Carol – Blog: Carol Cooks 2 – Twitter: @CarolCooksTwo – Facebook: Carol Taylor

 

My thanks to Carol for creating this wonderful series and we hope that you have enjoyed. As always we are delighted to receive your feedback and if you could share that would be great.. thanks Sally.

 

Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – October 31st – November 6th 2022 – Hits 1940s, Tony Bennett, Spiritual Awareness, Poetry, Podcast, Book Reviews, Health and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts from the week that you might have missed on Smorgasbord.

I hope you have had a good week so far although I do find it hard to believe we are in November already. I don’t know where this year has gone but it seems to have flown by. Still I guess it is true, time flies when you are having fun!

We have had three heavy storms come across us in the last week and on one day 90 mph gusts. No major damage but we did lose our metal birdseed tree which was a favourite with the garden visitors as it snapped in two as it feel on to the patio. Thankfully the bird feed pyramid that David built on the stump of an old tree survived and at least our resident birds managed to get some food in the gaps in the weather. In a complete contrast there will be a couple of days in this next week with warm temperatures and sunshine.

My next book is finished and is now going to be polished and my tapestry is completed and will go to be stretched and framed. I have been enjoy my two hours every afternoon getting back into the needlework groove so I have ordered a new piece which should arrive this week. It is a big canvas and will keep me busy for a few months.

Contributor News this week.

William Price King joined me for The Breakfast Show for the next in the series on hits from the 1940s and the first post in the series about the ultimate showman Tony Bennett.  You can also find William Blog– IMPROVISATIONWilliam Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies​ was here on Monday morning with her next post in her Spiritual Awareness series on Angels….and she joined me for the laughter post on Tuesday with some funnies she had found for us. Over on her own blog you can enjoy Debby’s Sunday Book Review for A Ride Down the Milky Way by Sherri-Lee Viitala, and a post on the therapy that writing brings in its many formats.  Follow the link to Debby’s posts D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor is here on Wednesday with her  A-Z of food with the letter ‘K’…on her own blog you will find Monday Musings on all things Halloween, a wonderful recipe for Chicken Pie with Filo Pastry for something a little lighter Roasted Onions with Sun Dried Tomatoes, The renowned cuisine of France, more about roots including the Lotus Root, Saturday Snippets where the prompt is Ginger.   Here is the link to Carol’s round up CarolCooks2 weekly roundup…24th October- 5th November 2022

Thank you too for all your visits, comments and shares during the week. As always very much appreciated…♥

 On with the show….

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 1940s – Bing Crosby, The Mills Brothers, Johnny Mercer, Freddy Martin

William Price King meets the Music Legends – Tony Bennett – Introduction and Early Years

Spiritual Awareness – Fey – Cutting Emotional Cords with Archangels by D.G. Kaye

#Memoir – Life on the Ocean Wave – Part Five -1943 – 1946 – HMS Forth and captured U-boats, Ceylon, HMS Woolwich, Earl Mountbatten by Eric Coleman

Poetry – Dorothy Cronin (1949- 2006) – One Day at a Time

#Poetry #Flash Fiction – Recycling Centre and Storm Windows

Smorgasbord Health Column – #Obesity #Hunger – The role #Leptin plays in weight loss

Stress, Man, Hand, Flames, Burn, Fire, Face, Old

#Headaches – Possible triggers and the nutritional factor by Sally Cronin

#Photography #Poetry #Flash – Do What You love: Fragility Of Your Flame Poems, Photography and Flash Fiction by M.J. Mallon

October Round Up – Kwan Kew Lai, Chris Hall, D.L. Finn, Jan Sikes, Jacqui Murray, Dan Antion

Previous Reviews 2021 – #Family # Murder #Mystery – Going Home by Sharon Marchisello

Previous Reviews 2021 – #Teen/YA #Sci-fi #Fantasy – The Syk’m by Richard Dee

Previous Reviews 2021- #Fantasy #Adventure – The Ferryman and the Sea Witch by D.Wallace Peach

D.G.Kaye with Christy Birmingham-Reyes, Ritu Bhathal, Pete Springer, Audrey Driscoll, Traci Kenworth

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Puppy adoption and Husband Mart

Host Sally Cronin – Cats glorious Cats and Excuse Notes.

 

Thanks very much for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week….Sally.

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up 24th -30th October 2022 – Tapestry, WIP, 1940s Hits, Kiri Te Kanawa, Food ‘J’, HMS Beverley, Poetry, Book Reviews, Health and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed this week on Smorgasbord.

I hope you are well and have had a good week. We have been catching up on the dry month of September and first two week’s of October with inches of rain and high winds. I have a feeling Halloween will be a bit of a washout and not much fun ‘trick or treating’. To be honest we don’t get much out where we are as it is quite sparce on houses, but it was a great excuse usually to get a tub of Quality Street in just in case!  I have avoided the temptation this year and of course the door bell will chime to prove me wrong.

I hope that if you are celebrating Halloween you have a great time and get more treats than tricks.

I am in the last stages of my current tapestry and my WIP. Both of which now undergoing line by line editing. For the tapestry this involves finding the odd stitch that has been missed, which is easy to do, the back of the canvas then needs tidying with loose threads being snipped back and then a steam pressing to make sure completely flat before going to the framers. I will take a photo when it returns. I have another half finished canvas of a large bowl of cherries which is next and I must say I am enjoying getting back to the stitching.

My WIP a combined poetry and short story collection should be available by the end of November and more news on that nearer the time.

Contributor News this week.

William Price King joined me for The Breakfast Show for the next in the series on hits from the 1940s and the last in the post on the extraordinaryly talented Dame Kira Te Kanawa. Coming up on Friday a new series on the music legend Tony Bennett. You can also find William Blog– IMPROVISATIONWilliam Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies​ is here on Monday morning with her next post in her Spiritual Awareness series on Angels….and she joined me for the laughter post on Tuesday with some Halloween funnies. Over on her own blog you can enjoy Debby’s Sunday Book Review for The Second Mrs Astor by Shana Abe, and a link to her wonderful interview with Christy Birmingham- Reyes. Follow the link to Debby’s posts D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor was here on Wednesday with her  A-Z of food with the letter ‘J’…on her own blog you will find Monday Musings looking at some innovative ways to recycle waste, Ricotta, blackberry and walnut toast for a breakfast treat, a post on walking which is healthy exercise both free and effective, a launch post for Jacqui Murray’s recent releaze, a look at more edible roots and Saturday Snippets exploring the world of ‘lost and found’.  Here is the link to Carol’s round up Carol Taylor’s round up 23rd – 29th October 2022

Thank you too for all your visits, comments and shares during the week. As always very much appreciated…♥

 On with the show….

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 1940s – Billie Holiday, Glenn Miller, Vera Lynn, Nat King Cole-

William Price King meets the Music Legends – #Classical – Dame Kiri Te Kanawa – Part Three – Career Highlights

Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘J’ for Jelly Beans, Jalapenos, Jack Fruit and Jerky all with a little Jus

Podcast – #Poetry #Flash Fiction – Halloween and The Witch’s Handbook

beating heart GIF

Size Matters: The Sequel – #Morbid Obesity – The power of sleep when losing weight and to be healthy by Sally Cronin

Memoir – Life on the Ocean Wave – Part Four – 1942 – HMS Beverley – American shipmates and rough seas by Eric Coleman

Dorothy Cronin (1949- 2006) – Emer’s Song

#Comingofage #Fantasy – Knuckleheads: Dreamer’s Alliance Book 1, by Dan Antion

 

Previous Reviews 2021 – #Dogs #Mountains #Humour – Olive, Mabel and Me: Life and Adventures with Two Very Good Dogs by Andrew Cotter

Previous Reviews 2021 – #Poetry – Son of Booku: More Halloween Haiku by Annette Rochelle Aben

#Fantasy #Comingofage – Realms of the Mist by Jude Itakali

#SocialMedia #Cyberbullying – The Bubble Reputation – Alex Craigie

#Historical #Medieval #Romance – The Wild Rose and the Sea Raven by Jennifer Ivy Walker

#Espagnol #English – Chile: Southern Cross for the 1st Time by Rebecca Cuningham

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Trick or Treating and Halloween Puns

Top 8 : Halloween Day Jokes For Adults | Just Quikr presents birthday ...

Fright Night Halloween – Host Sally Cronin and the Senior Team

 

Thanks very much for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week… Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘J’ for Jelly Beans, Jalapenos, Jack Fruit and Jerky all with a little Jus


Welcome to a repeat of the series from Carol Taylor, the wonderful Culinary A – Z and a reminder, not only of the amazing variety of food we have available to us today from around the world, but delicious recipes to showcase them. Carol also introduces to cooking methods and kitchen equipment that assist in creating meals for all occasions.

Welcome once again to Carols Cooking Column and today in my culinary trawl we have the letter J.

 

I hope you are enjoying this series of the A-z of food as much as I have the research and writing.

Starting with one of my favourite little sweeties the Jelly Bean…

Jelly Beans are primarily made of sugar with a jelly inside a candy shell…There are some awesome flavours…Tabasco Flavour, Chilli Mango, Marguerita and some beautiful fruity flavours…Cringe-worthy flavours like Earthworm, Earwax and vomit are for me a No No! But I suppose for Halloween revellers they will be on someone’s list…

Jelly:

Depending on where in the world you live Jelly can be a wibbly wobbly fruit jelly made with gelatin which in England is served with fruit and cream or used to make a trifle. In the US jelly is put on bread or toast or made into a tart and is what we Brits call jam…Are you confused yet?

Jellies are also sweets…fruit jellies of all shapes and sizes…They may be plain or covered in sugar but are what we call jellies in England.

Jalapeno Peppers…

Those of you who know this lady knows that she loves her hot peppers and these are no exception to this…Jalapeno Peppers on a Pizza or in a chilli …Pickled with carrots was a new one on me until about 18 months ago when someone I met who came from Texas gave me this recipe …I am addicted to them as are the men in this household lovely as a little spicy nibble as one passes the fridge or with some cheese and biscuits as a little snack with a beer…

Jalapenos and carrots

Jamaican Jerk Seasoning… I was given this recipe many years ago when we visited Jamaica for our daughter’s wedding… Think Steel Drums on a beach…Beautiful and our guide who was a huge man going by the name of Wolf… He gave us the best tours of the island and some recipes from the lovely food his wife cooked for us one night… a holiday to remember …

Ingredients:

• 1 tablespoon onion flakes.
• 2 teaspoons ground thyme.
• 1 teaspoon dried parsley.
• 1 teaspoon ground allspice.
• 1⁄4 teaspoon ground cinnamon.
• 1 teaspoon ground black pepper.
• 1⁄2 teaspoon cayenne pepper.
• 1 teaspoon paprika.

Mix together and store in an airtight container.

Jasmine Pearls…

Beautifully handcrafted green tea leaves…An exquisite tea…

Since living here I have learnt how to brew green tea properly and these pearls are a treat a beautiful tea…

Juniper Berries…

 

The primary flavour in gin and they also make a lovely rich sauce and pair very well with venison.

For the ways to prepare Juniper berries: Fruity Fridays

Jasmine Rice…

Thai jasmine rice is the long grain rice which is well known for its fragrance and taste all around the world. Thai jasmine rice is one of the main export products of the central and northeastern of Thailand. Because of the most suitable geographic location, Thailand can grow the best quality and unique jasmine rice.

Thai Jasmine rice is also known as Thai Hom Mali rice, Thai Jasmine Rice and Thai Fragrant Rice…

Jambalaya…

Is a one-pot recipe of chicken, sausage, shrimp and rice which has its roots in the Creole
community.

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya“). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood.

Many variations exist of this recipe often passed down through the family. and often Jambalaya and gumbo get mixed up but they are two different dishes and there has been many a battle to determine which takes the crown… A beautiful warming dish on a cold night and one which tastes even better the next day when the flavours have been allowed to develop.

Julienne…

A technique of cutting vegetables, fruit or citrus rinds into matchstick-sized strips.

Jus…

French for juice, in restaurant terms jus usually refers to the pan juices from a piece of meat used to sauce it on the plate.

Jaffa Cakes… Almost iconic ..Chocolate covered orange biscuits, bite-sized genoise cakes first introduced to the UK in 1927 by McVities…In 2012 they were ranked the best selling cake in the UK…

Jack Fruit…

Often mistaken for Durian…Jackfruit is now hailed by Vegans as the best alternative to pulled Pork and indeed when the young Jackfruit is cooked it does resemble cooked meat…I was absolutely astounded the first time I cooked a young jackfruit as to how much it changed the texture and taste…

However to get to the lovely fruit is something else …But never fear I have included a lesson in how to get into that big green fruit …Think latex and all will be revealed…haha

For ways to prepare Jack Fruit: Fruity Friday

Jerky:
Jerky is lean trimmed meat that has been cut into strips and dried (dehydrated) to prevent spoilage. Normally, this drying includes the addition of salt to prevent bacteria growth before the meat has finished the dehydrating process.

Jerky is popular all around the world and I am sure there are many different recipes. Here in Thailand it is very popular and made using either beef or pork. Normally sun dried and it can be either threaded on bamboo much like a necklace or slightly larger pieces which are sold by the weight.

Homemade Beef Jerky…The Thai Way…

Ingredients

• 1 lb top round steak, cut into strips measuring approximately 4 inches long, ½ inch wide, and ¼ inch thick
• 2 tbsp fish sauce
• 1 tbsp dark or light soy sauce
• 2 tsp sugar
• ½ tsp ground white (or black) pepper
• Vegetable oil for frying
• White sesame to garnish(optional)

Let’s Cook!

  1. Heat the oven to 120°F and set a rack in the middle of it. Spread out the beef strips on a large cookie sheet and let them dry out in the oven for one hour. Turn the beef strips over and let them dry for another hour.
  2. You know the beef strips are ready when their surface is dry to the touch while the texture is still somewhat soft and elastic. When that happens, remove the beef strips from the oven or the drying basket and place them in a mixing bowl.
  3. Meanwhile, heat up some vegetable oil in a deep-fryer or an 8- to a 12-inch frying pan with a raised edge on medium heat. You only need just enough vegetable oil to come up to about 2 inches from the bottom of the pan. Line a platter with a piece of paper towel and keep it nearby.
  4. Add the fish sauce, soy sauce, pepper, and sugar to the beef strip bowl and toss; make sure that all of the beef strips are evenly coated with the seasoning sauce.
  5. Test the oil by sticking a wooden skewer or chopstick into the oil, making sure the tip of the wooden skewer touches the bottom of the pan. If you see tiny bubbles rising from the point where the wooden skewer touches the pan, the oil is ready.
  6. Shake excess seasoning off of the beef strips and fry them in two batches. Be sure to stir the beef strips around to ensure even cooking. On medium heat, the beef only needs to be in the oil for less than a minute. You’ll see that the beef will brown up and develop a nice, glossy coating. When that happens, transfer them to the paper towel-lined platter.
  7. Sprinkle with some sesame seeds if using.
  8. Serve the fried sun-dried beef with spicy Thai dipping sauce and sticky rice.

Enjoy!

N.B. I dry my beef outside before frying but have given instructions to oven dry as I know many of you don’t have the weather I have here.

Jersey Royals:

The Jersey Royal is a unique potato, lovingly crafted and carefully grown on the island of Jersey since the late 1800s. The island itself is optimal for growing potatoes, with its unique microclimate, soil and environment creating the perfect conditions for this special spud to flourish.

They are also my favourite new potato, cooked and served with butter and mint I could eat a bowlful just on their own.

Besides being unique to Jersey, the Jersey Royal enjoys EU protection of designation of origin in much the same way that France was granted sole use of the word ‘champagne’. The Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) is an official recognition granted by the EU to protect the product as it is produced in its country of origin. This, in addition to Jersey’s unique growing conditions, make these potatoes particularly unique.

Thank you for reading I hope you have enjoyed this little trip through the Culinary alphabet…Until next time when it will be the letter K.

About Carol Taylor

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetables ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use have to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: Amazon US

Connect to Carol – Blog: Carol Cooks 2 – Twitter: @CarolCooksTwo – Facebook: Carol Taylor

 

My thanks to Carol for creating this wonderful series and we hope that you have enjoyed. As always we are delighted to receive your feedback and if you could share that would be great.. thanks Sally.

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – 10th -16th October 2022 – Kiri Te Kanawa, Royal Navy Memories, Poetry, Food, Podcast, Book Reviews, Bloggers, Health and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed on Smorgasbord this week.

Autumn and rushed in this week with gales, storms and plenty of rain. The grass is back to its vibrant green although the trees look very bare. It is however always good to remember that in the spring they will be back to their glory again with even more blossom.

I have been spending the afternoons with tapestry and music exploring my older playlists with music that I don’t get to listen to as often as I would like. I am making good progres with my elephant and her calf and now I have a special pair of glasses that go over my own to increase magnification I am finding it a lot easier. Not to mention I am not missing quite so many stitches.

I am also making good progress on my latest collection and hope to get that on the shelves by the end of November… I have finally settled on a title along the theme of ‘Life’ as for the other recent collections and it was hiding in plain site as you will see!

Contributor News this week.

William Price King joined me for The Breakfast Show for the last part of chart hits from 2005 and this coming week we are taking some steps back in time to the music of the 40s and then the 50s until the end of the year.  Also this week the first post in the series on the wonderfully talented Dame Kira Te Kanawa. You can also find William Blog– IMPROVISATIONWilliam Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies​ will be here on Monday morning with her secon post in her Spiritual Awareness series on Angels….and last week she joined me for the laughter posts with some gems she had found on her travels. Over on her own blog you can enjoy Debby’s book review for Luna Saint Claire and The Serpent Awakensand a launch post for the latest book for Jan Sikes.. Follow the link to Debby’s posts D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor was here on Wednesday with her  A-Z of food with the letter ‘I’… on her own blog Monday Musings on Goats and Mental Health Week, World Porridge Day, versatile Eggs, Cuisine of the Faroe Islands, Fragrant roots and Saturday Snippets. Head over to enjoy – CarolCooks2 weekly roundup…9th- 15th October 2022 

Thank you too for all your visits, comments and shares during the week. As always very much appreciated…♥

On with the show

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 2005 Part two- Mariah Carey, The Killers, John Legend, Michael Buble

William Price King meets the Music Legends – #Classical – Dame Kiri Te Kanawa – The Early Years

Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘I’ is for Icing, Ink Fish, Indian Black Salt, Infusing Immortalittea and Irish Stew…

#Flash Fiction – Musical Interlude and Reunion by Sally Cronin

#Memoir – Life on the Ocean Wave – Chapter Two – Royal Navy Training -1936 and two encounters with the King and HMS Nelson by Eric Coleman

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry – Dorothy Cronin (1949 – 2006) – ‘Immortality’

Size Matters: The Sequel – #Morbid Obesity – Getting Moving and shifting the pounds by Sally Cronin

#Romance #Paranormal Saddled Hearts (The White Rune Series Book 3) by Jan Sikes

 

Previous Reviews 2021 – #Poetry – Slivers: Chiseled Poetry by Balroop Singh

New Book on the Shelves – #Paranormal #Thriller – Pre-Order Ghost Mark (Dark Dreams Book 2) by JP Mclean

#Preorder – #Family – Letting Go: The Defiant Sisters- Book1 (The Defiant Sisters Duet) by Jacquie Biggar

#Anthology – Distant Flickers: Stories of Identity & Loss Rita Baker, Amy Wallen, Elizabeth Gauffreau, Joyce Yarrow, Donna Koros Stramella,​ Jim Metzner​, Keith Madsen,​ Carol LaHines

Jacqueline Lambert #Reviews- Kat the Dog: The Remarkable Tale of a Rescued Spanish Water Dog by Alyson Sheldrake

The Rise of Short Stories by Gwen Plano

#SightImpairment – #Dogtraining by Patty Fletcher

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Psychology and the Law, Overseas Posting

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Surgery options and military jokes

 

Thanks very much for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week.. Sally

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘I’ is for Icing, Ink Fish, Indian Black Salt, Infusing Immortalittea and Irish Stew…


Welcome to a repeat of the series from Carol Taylor, the wonderful Culinary A – Z and a reminder, not only of the amazing variety of food we have available to us today from around the world, but delicious recipes to showcase them. Carol also introduces to cooking methods and kitchen equipment that assist in creating meals for all occasions.

Welcome once again to Carols Cooking Column and today in my culinary trawl we have the letter I.

I am loving this series as I am discovering terms and names I didn’t know or didn’t think I knew so I hope you are too.

I for me was not as easy as some and not so many terms in the culinary alphabet beginning with the letter I although as I was writing I did think of some more it takes me a while sometimes…getting old…lol

I know Ice Cream is mine and many other peoples favourite thing so I left it out…I thought I would feature some lesser known terms.

Infuse.

Means…To extract flavour from one food to another often by heating or steeping. Teas are infusions.

Icing…

The icing on many a cake or biscuit it can be plain or fancy…from cupcakes to the fanciest of wedding cakes or little iced biscuits…

It comes in so many variations there are so many talented bakers…When I see some of the intricate patterns I am in awe…

The icing is generally used to glaze pastries or cakes and tastes more sugary than frosting. Icing can be used to make beautiful flooded decorations on cakes or biscuits. Who doesn’t love a drizzle cake ??

Isinglass Finings.

Is what makes your beer clear…

Isinglass is a traditional finings, a substance that causes yeast to precipitate out of suspension, leaving beer clear. Isinglass is derived from the swim bladders of certain tropical and subtropical fish. When macerated and dissolved for several weeks, they form a colorless, viscous solution largely made up of the protein collagen. This material is known to brewers as isinglass finings.

Traditionally, isinglass for brewing purposes was derived from sturgeon, although modern commercial isinglass is more typically derived from tropical estuarine dwellers, such as the Nile Perch Lates niloticus from Lake Victoria, where it is considered an invasive species.

The best quality finings originates in the South China Sea and is identified as Round Saigon or Long Saigon finings. The swim bladder is sun-dried at the catch site and then packed for export to markets in China, where it is used to make fish maw soup, or to the UK to make isinglass finings.

Indian Corn.

Doesn’t that look pretty?

Is a variant of maize…Very colorful and pretty…It is mostly sold for ornamental purposes and used in displays…Can you eat it? It is also known as flint corn and some varieties are used for popping for popcorn or it can be ground into flour.

Insalata.

Quite simply the Italian word for salad and sounds so much more than just salad…Don’t you think?

Irish Stew.

Winter is coming in many places now although here it is the opposite High season is coming.

A traditional Irish stew has been around since about the 1800’s. Traditionally it consisted of nothing but mutton chops or neck, potatoes, onions, and water…I have fond memories of when my mother used to make it with white gravy as we called it although she did add carrots and barley … Like any traditional dishes, there are many regional differences and all think theirs is the original and all tasty.

Photo credit: daspunkt on Visual hunt / CC BY

Ink Fish (Octopus)

Octopus an eight-limbed soft-bodied mollusc…They have three hearts and blue blood which they squirt at any predators. They are the subject in many films and myths and are also very nice to eat…

In Korea, some small species are sometimes eaten raw as a novelty food. A raw octopus is usually sliced up, seasoned quickly with salt and sesame seeds and eaten while still squirming posthumously. A common food in the Mediterranean with the ink used to color rice dishes like paella or pasta.

I like my octopus in a tomato based stew or grilled with a lemon sauce.

Immortalittea ( Green Chai)

Was originally blended for medicinal purposes and is said to be highly anti-ageing, anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant it is a carefully balanced blend of Mediterranean and North American spices and has a more muted flavour than traditional chai tea not a bit medicinal in flavour as one would think it has a floral, piney flavor with fresh green undertones…

Italian Herb blend

A very popular herb blend which is used in many dishes and also very easy to make using herbs from your store cupboard.

Ingredients:

• 6 tablespoons dried basil
• 2 tablespoons dried oregano
• 1 tablespoon dried marjoram
• 1 tablespoon dried thyme

Mix together and store in an airtight container.
Easy as 1 2 3….isn’t it?

Indian Vanilla Bean.

Who would think that you would get such a wonderful fragrance from a dried bean??
India the country of spices and Vanilla being one of them…introduced about 1850 it is thought to be superior to the Madagascan Vanilla … I have no opinion on this as of yet I have not used the Indian variety which is said to be sweet, creamy and extremely aromatic…and can be used in any dishes requiring vanilla.

Imu:

A traditional pit oven furrowed with rocks and banana leaves used for cooking meats.

Iceberg Lettuce.

Iceberg lettuce …It used to be very popular but with the emergence of so many colorful, nutritious lettuces seems to have taken a bit of a back seat… I like it! It makes a lovely crispy base for prawn cocktails and it lasts and does not wilt as quickly as some other lettuces and in a sandwich adds that welcome crunch there is to me nothing lovelier than a prawn mayo sandwich with iceberg lettuce…Just saying!

Indian Black Salt.

Indian black salt, or kala namak, is an Indian volcanic rock salt. … It starts out as Himalayan Pink Salt or sodium chloride and is then heated to extremely high temperatures and mixed with Indian spices and herbs including the seeds of the harad fruit (Indian Walnut) which contains sulfur.

That’s all for this month I hope you have enjoyed my choices and maybe like me discovered some you were not familiar with.

Thank you for reading I hope you have enjoyed this little trip through the Culinary alphabet…Until next time when it will be the letter J.

About Carol Taylor

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetables ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use have to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: Amazon US

Connect to Carol – Blog: Carol Cooks 2 – Twitter: @CarolCooksTwo – Facebook: Carol Taylor

 

My thanks to Carol for creating this wonderful series and we hope that you have enjoyed. As always we are delighted to receive your feedback and if you could share that would be great.. thanks Sally.