Smorgasbord Laughter is the Best Medicine – Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Fluffy Butt and Pub talk


Firstly, some funnies from Debby Gies followed by some funnies from Sally. Thanks to those who share the funnies on the internet.

D.G. Writes is where you will find an archive full of wonderful posts across several subjects including writing tips, social issues and book reviews.

 

My thanks to Debby for excellent foraging

D. G. Kaye – Buy: Amazon US And: Amazon UK Blog: D.G. WritesGoodreads: D.G. Kaye on Goodreads – Twitter: @pokercubster

Check out Debby’s latest Travel Column: Cuba

Now for some fun from Sally….

Knowledge and Faith

Father O’Grady was preaching the difference between knowledge and faith.

‘In the front row we have Teresa and Shamus with their six children,’ he said. ‘Teresa knows they are her children. That’s knowledge.

Shamus believes they are his children. That’s faith.’

Restaurants.

There is a Mongolian-Jewish restaurant. It’s called Genghis Cohen..

******

Two crayfish in a restaurant’s aquarium realised that this would probably be their last night together. The male started kissing and cuddling the female. She said: ‘Okay, but will you still respect me in the mornay?’

******

A Scot, Irishman and an Englishman were dining together in a restaurant. When the waiter cleared away the coffee the Scot was heard to ask for the bill.

Next day the newspaper headlines declared: Irish Ventriloquist shot in restaurant.

In the pub…..

An Englishman, a Frenchman(the Scot was busy that day) and an Irishman were in a pub talking about their children.

‘My son was born on St George’s Day, ‘remarked the Englishman, ‘So we obviously decided to call him George.’

‘That’s a real coincidence’, observed the Frenchman’, My daughter was born on Valentine’s Day, so we decided to call her Valentine.’

‘That’s really incredible’, drawled the Irishman, ‘Exactly the same thing happened with my son Pancake.’

Thank you for joining us today and we hope you are leaving with a smile on your face.. Debby and Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Travel Column Rewind with D.G. Kaye – The Island of #Cuba #Caribbean


Welcome to this month’s edition of the Travel Column at the Smorgasbord. Today we’re going to learn more about the island of Cuba.

Please check for current travel restrictions: Cuba Tourism website

Officially named, the Republic of Cuba, Cuba is located in the northern part of the Caribbean where the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea meet, just south of Florida and the Bahamas. Havana is the capital of Cuba and the largest city of the Republic. Cuba also reigns over another island, Isla de la Juventud (Isle of Youth) as well as a quite a few other minor archipelagos, covering a land mass of over 42,800 square miles. The exact name of Cuba and where it was derived from are unknown. It is believed that Christopher Columbus named the island for a town named Cuba from his native Portugal. The native language is Cuban Spanish, their own dialect from original Spanish.

Similar to many other Caribbean islands, Cuba was inhabited by the Taino people since 4000 – 3000 BC until the 15th century when it became a colony of Spain, again, until the Spanish American War of 1898 when it became occupied by the United States. After signing the Treaty of Paris in 1898 and more politics, Cuba became formally independent from the U.S. May 20, 1902, going through several leaderships and several political takeovers leading to the eventual takeover by a dictatorship in 1952 by Fulgencio Batista until he was ousted for his corruption and taken over by Fidel Castro under communist rule. Cuba is culturally considered part of Latin America and exports sugar, coffee and tobacco and nickel. As of 2016, Cuba was still declared an authoritarian government ruled country.

Before Castro took over in 1959, Cuba was considered one of the most advanced countries in Latin America. Cuba relied heavily on aid from the USSR. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, their economy went into a sliding depression, allowing some the opportunity for self-employment and the legalization of using the U.S. dollar for business, encouraging tourism.

For many decades, Cubans were not allowed to leave this island, yet many tried to flee communism in unsafe methods to get across the waters. Prior to January 2013, Cuban citizens weren’t allowed to travel abroad without obtaining official permission and applying for a government issued passport, which was usually denied and cost 5 month’s salary. Back on September 9, 1994, the U.S. had agreed to grant Cuba 20,000 visas annually if Cuba kept a promise to prevent further dangerous attempts to enter the U.S. by unsafe methods across the water.

Also, with the intervention of the U.S. government, in 2010, Cubans were granted permission to build their own houses. Approximately 85% of people own their homes paying no property taxes or mortgage interest. It is said there is no homelessness in Cuba. But in May of this year, because of increased U.S. trade embargo and a large decline of aid from Venezuela, and oil and fuel costs, Cuba has begun rationing staples, as almost two thirds of their country’s food is imported. Cuba’s natural resources include tobacco, fish, citrus and tropical fruits, coffee, beans, rice, chicken, potatoes and their most important export mineral – nickel. Cuba is currently drilling for oil as a geological survey has shown their capability to produce approximately 4 – 9 billion barrels.

Currency

Cuba has what is known as a dual currency system. The Cuban peso (CUP) is used to set wages and prices, while Convertible pesos (CUC) is used for the tourist economy, set at par with the U.S. dollar.

Tourism

Tourism in Cuba was originally restricted to segregated areas designed for tourism, and away from Cuban society. But it was marked that in 2003 over 1.9 million tourists visited Cuba mainly from Canada and Europe, helping to generate revenue for the country. In 2011 that number jumped to just over 2 ½ million tourists, making it the 3rd highest tourist destination in the Caribbean, coming in just behind Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.

Many Canadians travel to Cuba for their winter vacations, as it’s one of the cheapest winter vacations for us despite the political clime.

Note: There have been issues in the past on travel to Cuba for American citizens and it is a good idea to check updated details on this site Guide to Americans traveling to Cuba. You can also learn more about Legal Documentation required and what is and isn’t permissible when traveling to Cuba.

Climate

Climate in Cuba is tropical with light trade winds blowing throughout the year. Dry season is typically November through April with the rainy season May to October. Average temps run from 70 to 80 degrees. And of course, like most islands vulnerable to hurricanes, because Cuba sits close to the Gulf of Mexico, it is prone to frequent hurricanes. Cuba was hit by Irma in 2017, leaving enough damage, but incomparable to the damage after it hit Puerto Rico.

Beaches

Cuba is known to have some of the most pristine and beautiful white sand beaches. Couple that with turquoise waters, quiet and palm trees, it presents a serene and warm getaway. Some of the most beautiful and popular vacation spots in Cuba are Varadero (currently rated 2nd best beach in the world for 2019 by Tripadvisor), Santa Maria, and Los Cayos Coco, just to name a few. All tourist beaches offer the usual watersport activities and guided boat tours. You can read more details about the various beaches HERE

Shopping

Cuba isn’t typically known as the best shopping destination in the Caribbean, but there are still a few great finds to be had there. Cuba’s number one claim to fame are ‘the Cuban cigars’, which are treasured widely by cigar afficionados around the world. You can also find local chain stores, and a few boutiques in hotel shops where you may find some international brands of clothing and toiletries. Cuba also has some well-known rums. And as on most Caribbean islands, you can always find local markets selling hand-crafted goods from leather and wood, as well as handmade textile articles.

Gastronomy

A typical national Cuban dish is rice with black beans, a salad, roast pork (or fish or chicken, occasionally, beef), and fried plantains. This traditional dish is known as ‘comida criolla’. But in hotels and what’s classified as ‘the tourist network’, you can find various restaurants, specializing in Spanish, Italian and Chinese cuisine. I think there’s tons of room to grow in the sector of gastronomy for Cuba.
Notable Facts

• The music of Cuba is world famous for its Salsa, Bolero, and Rumba dancing.
• Don’t talk about politics while there as Cuba is still a communist country and their government doesn’t tolerate criticism lightly
• Crime levels are minimal. And you can usually find police on every block
• Least commercialized island in the Caribbean
• Make sure if you are going to stay in a bed and breakfast that it is one with a blue sign, not an orange sign on the front of the house. The orange sign is for Cubans only and both tourist and house owner can get in trouble by not abiding
• Never be working there on a tourist visa
• It is considered illegal to take photos of police and/or soldiers
• It is considered rude by Cubans to blow your nose or spit in public.
• Make sure to pack everything you may need for the trip to Cuba as there are many shortages of consumer goods – especially toiletries.
• Most of the cars driven in Cuba are old American cars dating back to prior of 1959 when America once played a big part of the central stage in Cuba. Once Castro came to power, he banned all imports of foreign cars and parts. But in the last couple of years a growing number of new Asian automobiles have been brought into the country. These newer vehicles are very expensive for the typical Cuban local and mostly unattainable
• Don’t forget to tip for every service you receive. The locals earn very little in Cuba, and those working in service industry desperately rely on tips
• The average salary for a Cuban is $20 per month!

My perspective

I have never been to Cuba, but I have quite a few friends and family members who travel there every winter to escape the cold and get a good bang for their bucks. Because I can’t speak from actual experience, I will share a few more things I have learned first-hand from those I know who have been there:

• It’s the beautiful weather and unspoiled beaches keeping them going back
• The food is less than spectacular
• Be sure to pack some old clothes – especially sneakers you no longer wish to keep and give them to the maids or any other service person in your resort. They will be more than thrilled to have anything wearable, especially American items they have no access to
• Don’t stray far from your resort without a guide
• If you’re looking for sun and sea and a more quiet and lazy vacation and aren’t a big foodie, you’ll enjoy it there

Me, personally, I have zero interest in going to Cuba despite the beautiful weather and beaches. I am not a big foodie to say the least, but I have several dietary restrictions that wouldn’t be met there for me – so I’ve been told. Also, if I’m going to travel to an island, I’d surely be going to one offering shopping – especially, international duty-free shopping! Plus, as a justice seeker with a difficult time keeping my opinions to myself, it may prove difficult for me to be somewhere where I couldn’t use the freedom of speech.

Has anyone here ever been to Cuba and would like to share their experience? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

© D.G. Kaye 2019

My thanks to Debby for sharing the guide to Cuba’s history and tourism. We usually select our holidays from glossy magazines or flash online websites that give you the showstopping information but not necessarily the possible downside to a location..Important to have all the facts before spending a great deal of money.

Debby Gies is a Canadian nonfiction/memoir author who writes under the pen name of D.G. Kaye. She was born, raised, and resides in Toronto, Canada. Kaye writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

D.G. writes to inspire others. Her writing encompasses stories taken from events she encountered in her own life, and she shares the lessons taken from them. Her sunny outlook on life developed from learning to overcome challenges in her life, and finding the upside from those situations, while practicing gratitude for all the positives.

When Kaye isn’t writing intimate memoirs, she brings her natural sense of humor into her other works. She loves to laugh and self- medicate with a daily dose of humor.

I love to tell stories that have lessons in them, and hope to empower others by sharing my own experiences. I write raw and honest about my own experiences, hoping through my writing, that others can relate and find that there is always a choice to move from a negative space, and look for the positive.

Quotes:

“Live Laugh Love . . . And Don’t Forget to Breathe!”

“For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

Books by D.G. Kaye

One of the reviews for Have Bags Will Travel

marjorie mallon5.0 out of 5 stars A fun travel/shopping memoir which will have you laughing Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 21 February 2021

This is such a hoot, what a laugh!

Have Bags Will Travel is such an entertaining read which gives you an insight into D G Kaye’s character, her shopping obsession, packing troubles, germaphobia, and brushes with airport security. Enjoy her recollections on the glamour and glitz, her love to travel and a nostalgic aspect to it all.

Her friend Zan shares her shopaholic tendencies too. The two of them together… can you imagine? A red head, blonde explosion of zaniness! I love the part when they end up at Buckingham Palace and chat to a Beefeater, the royal guard and after which… it gets funnier by the moment.

Have Bags Will Travel gives a historical account of how much easier it used to be to take overstuffed baggage through airports in the good old days. Now, it seems that D G Kaye will resort to anything to get her shopping home.

Zan and D G Kaye also travel to Paris and end up shopping for shoes!

There are manmade toboggan rides in Muskoka, Canada.

Trips to Venezuela: Margarita Island and Caracas with cousin Eileen.

Las Vegas, Then and Now – gambling/casinos, fond memories of the author’s love of the desert.

Have Bags Will Travel is just what we need right now, a good giggle! There is also a section at the back of the book with Helpful Travel tips.

A short, entertaining read. Highly recommended, especially for the shopoholics and travel enthusiasts in your life!

Read all the reviews and buy the books: Amazon US – and: Amazon UK – follow Debby: Goodreads – Blog: D.G. Kaye Writer – About me: D.G. Kaye – Twitter: @pokercubster Linkedin: D.G. Kaye – Facebook: D.G. Kaye – Instagram: D.G. Kaye – Pinterest: D.G. Kaye


 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up July 4th – 10th 2022 – Roberta Flack, Bahamas, Waterford, Food, Blog Promotion, Reviews, Health and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed this week on Smorgasbord.

I hope that you are all well and have had a good week. Nothing much to report here as we continue with the revamp of the house to put on the market.. still a couple of months away but I am spending time looking online at properties in the area we are considering. We have always been lucky with houses, finding the right one at the right time, so hoping this time will be the same.

On the blog front.. the new series of ‘Posts from Your Archives’ begins in August.  With your permission I will browse your posts between January and the end of June 2022 and select two to share in a post on Smorgasbord. They are copyrighted to you and will also include links and books etc. Full details are in the post along with an example of what your post will look like.. already 10 friends have signed up and I am looking forward to diving into their archives.

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives -#NewSeries August 2022- ‘Lucky Dip’ and Do You Trust Me??

Thanks to my friends William Price King and Debby Gies for their music and humour contributions this week and you can find out more about them on their own sites. .

William Price King joined me on The Breakfast show this week for the first part of the hits from 1998 and for the final part of the series about Roberta Flack.  Coming up on Friday a new series about the legend Nina Simone. You can also find William – Blog– IMPROVISATION– William Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies took us to The Bahamas to discover the beauty of this group of islands.. Over on her blog you can you can catch up with her posts including and explanation as to why you might be seeing the semicolon symbol on social media in another role other than as a punctuation mark…and also her book review for The Unravelling by Thorne Moore. .. D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor joined me on Wednesday with a repeat of her wonderful series A-Z of foods with the letter B. Carol is in England and has extended her visit for another month but she has left plenty to enjoy on her blog. This week a recipe for Chicken Nachos, The Green Kitchen with a recipe for Garlic Knots, upcycling and going plastic free. It is National Picnic Month in the UK and Carol shares recipes to delight the family. Add in Saturday Snippets and you will not go hungry You can find all her posts Carol Cooks2

Thanks too for all your visits, comments and shares this week… they mean a great deal..♥

 On with the show

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 1998 Part Two – Brandy and Monica, Cher, Robbie Williams, Bryan Adams & Melanie C

William Price King meets the Music Legends – Roberta Flack – The finale – Live Performances and Quotes

The Travel Column Rewind with D.G. Kaye – The Bahamas – 16 Islands in the Sun

Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – Baking Soda, Bananas, Broccoli, Butterflying food and cooking with a Bain Marie

Tales from the Irish Garden – After the Festival

#Colour – Crown Cinquain – Drought by Sally Cronin

– The Obesity epidemic – Where in the Lifestyle can we Intervene? – Part Two

#Obesity,#Weightloss, Size Matters: The Sequel – Life or Death? by Sally Cronin

Memoir #Waterford #Ireland 1930s – The Colour of Life – The Miser 1931 by Geoff Cronin

#Waterford #Ireland 1930s – The Colour of Life – The Art of Making Snares – 1934 by Geoff Cronin

#Poetry – Life & Soul (Book 2 in the Soul Poetry series) by Harmony Kent

Year 1 - Fur Babies in France: From Wage Slaves to Living the Dream (Adventure Caravanning with Dogs) by [Jacqueline Lambert]

#Travel #France Year 1 – Fur Babies in France: From Wage Slaves to Living the Dream (Adventure Caravanning with Dogs) by Jacqueline Lambert

First in Series – #Paranormal #Romance – This Second Chance (Angel & Evildwels Series Book 1) by D.L. Finn, #Portugal Louise Ross

First in Series #Children’s – Brody Cody and the Stepmother from Outer Space by Toni Pike, Myrtle the Purple Turtle by Cynthia Reyes

First in Series – #CrimeThriller Sue Coletta, #SupernaturalThriller JP Mclean

#Homelessness Pete Springer, #Reviews Jacquie Biggar, #Travel #Tuscany Jackie Lambert, #Age Rebecca Budd, #School #Life Ritu Bhathal, #Writing Judith Barrow with Patricia Osborne

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Sunbathing and Exam results

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Good Boys and Exam answers part two

 

Thank you for dropping by today and I hope you will join me again next week.. Sally.

Smorgasbord Laughter is the Best Medicine – Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Good Boys and Exam answers part two


Firstly, some funnies from Debby Gies followed by some funnies from Sally. Thanks to those who share the funnies on the internet.

D.G. Writes is where you will find an archive full of wonderful posts across several subjects including writing tips, social issues and book reviews.

 

My thanks to Debby for excellent foraging

D. G. Kaye – Buy: Amazon US And: Amazon UK Blog: D.G. WritesGoodreads: D.G. Kaye on Goodreads – Twitter: @pokercubster

Check out Debby’s latest Travel Column:The Bahamas

Now for some fun from Sally….Exam results part two

Apparently real answers to exam questions!!

Literature

As a youth Shakespeare spent a year under Queen Elizabeth.

Q. Who was Juliet’s father.   A. Lord Catapult

Q. Who was Juliet’s mother   A. Lady Copulate

It is mainly Hamlet’s actions that lead people to believe him mad – appearing and frightening Ophelia in her bedroom with his trousers round his ankles.

Cleopatra killed herself by taking aspic and died in her needle.

Anthony and Cleopatra is full of phallic cymbals.

It’s the way you tell ’em

Immigrants often do not bother to learn to speak the English Language let alone wright it.

Grate Britt’n has the best educain cistern in the wold.

If there was no scool rools there would be utercayoss

This is a specticcill not to be mist.

To vote you must be over the age of eighteen and be of fixed mind, meaning that you are not stupid and vote Conservative because it has a nice ring to it.

Q. Briefly describe how to carry out any simple repair – A. To mend a puncha stick a plasta on the in a choobe.

Misconceptions.

Sleeping sickness is brought on by the bite of the sexy fly.
The diver knew he had to act quickly when the octopus wrapped its testacles around him.
Weightlessness can be produced by over-dieting.
Some people have extra-sensual perception.
Pollution is caused by cars giving off intoxicating fumes.
An atheist is someone who puts you to sleep before an operation.

Historical inaccuracies.

Edward II was not fit to be a king. Whenever a tournament was going on he and Piers Gaveston would play dice and other games in the stables.

The King met the Barons at Runnymede for the Great Chatter.

The Black Death was a warning from God and this brought on masochistic activities such as a great wave of flatulence.

Henry wanted his marriage to Catherine of Aragon to be declared dull and void.

Drake said that the Armada could wait but his bowels couldn’t

Peter the Great westernised Russia by building cinemas and music halls.

King Louis didn’t bother that the peasants were starving – he just stayed in the palace and kept holding his balls.

In Italy Gary Baldy and his Gorillas rode to victory.

Source Howlers by William Cooke and illustrated by Mike Gordon Published 1988 Used copies are available on Ebay and Amazon.

 

Thank you for joining us today and we hope you are leaving with a smile on your face.. Debby and Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Travel Column Rewind with D.G. Kaye – The Bahamas – 16 Islands in the Sun


The Bahamas – 14 Islands Up and Running and Waiting for Tourists.

Welcome to this month’s edition of the Travel Column. For this month’s edition I wanted to write about the Bahamas. The Islands suffered devastating hurricane damage in September 2019 but is now well and truly open to visitors.

Do remember to check for any travel restrictions before booking your holiday: Official Bahamas Website

A Few Facts

Bahamas are officially known as the Commonwealth of the Bahamas – a country within the Lucayan Archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean. Contrary to what many misconstrue, the Bahamas are not owned by the United States. They are an independent country, part of a commonwealth who gained their independence from Britain in 1973. The vast territory of the Bahamas covers approximately 180,000 square miles of ocean space consisting of over 700 islands and islets and over 2000 coral reefs. Roughly only 30 of those islands are inhabited.

The Bahamas is located in the Northwestern Indies, about 50 miles southeast of Florida, just north of Cuba. The language spoken is English, most natives are descendants of Africa. Two most familiar and popular islands tourists visit are Freeport and Nassau, which is located on the island of New Providence. The capital of Bahamas is Nassau.

A Bit of History

The Bahamas were inhabited by the Lucayans – a branch of the Taino people (original inhabitants of the Caribbean for centuries before the arrival of the European colonizers). Columbus made his first landfall there in 1492. Later, the natives were shipped to Hispaniola to serve as slaves, leaving the Bahama islands mostly deserted from 1513 till 1648 when British colonists began to settle there. In 1718, Bahamas became a British Crown Colony, clamping down on piracy. After the American Revolution, American Loyalists (those who stood loyal to the British Crown), settled in the Bahamas with their slaves and built plantations. The majority of the population from this time period on, saw African slaves and their descendants populate the islands.

In 1807 the slave trade was abolished by the British, and finally abolished in the Bahamas in 1834. The Bahamas became the new safe haven for freed slaves. There was also an influx of North American slaves and Seminoles who migrated from Florida. Bahamas became an independent commonwealth in 1973 under the Queen. The Bahamas are the 3rd richest country in the world following the U.S. and Canada. Their wealth is based on tourism and offshore financing.

Climate

The low elevation and gulf stream contribute to Bahamas winterless, tropical climate, producing sunny and dry days for approximately 340 days a year. Tropical storms and hurricanes have impacted the Bahamas in 1992 – Hurricane Andrew, Hurricane Floyd in 1999, and most recently, and the most devasting, Hurricane Dorian, a Category 5 tropical cyclone – the strongest on record, which decimated the islands of Grand Bahama and Great Abaco. Average temps year-round are 75 degrees to 85.

Tourism

Bahamas rely on tourism for 50% of its income and offshore international financial services for about another 15%. Agriculture and manufacturing contribute to another part of their economy, still, 80% of the island’s food is imported. Bahamas are also known for being a tax haven. The government derives their taxes from importing taxes, licensing fees and property taxes. There is no income tax or tax on the wealthy. The currency used is the Bahamian dollar, which is set at the equivalent of the U.S. dollar.

Culture

The country is made up of Afro-Bahamians, British and Americans, with a huge population of American visitors. Each island is rich in its own culture, all of which offer coral reefs, turquoise waters and beautiful sandy beaches.

Beaches

While Bahamas is comprised of over 700 different islands, there are over 2000 recommended beaches! Of course, some beaches are more well known than others, but some of these not-so-well-known gems may be just the place for you. From quiet beaches to those of full on activity to white or pink sands, there is something for every beach lover in the Bahamas.

Most popular destinations in Bahamas are Paradise Island, Freeport, Grand Bahamas, Eleuthra, and Exuma Islands, and below, I’m sharing links with some recommendations and info on various islands and what they have to offer:

Sandals blog Best Beaches Nassau Bahamas

Best recommended places to stay in the Bahamas:

The Hotel Guru Best Hotels Bahamas

Travel and Leisure Bahamas Resorts

Shopping

Like many other Caribbean islands, souvenirs and trinkets are widely available on most islands. You can always find local straw items hand-crafted, designer boutiques, fine rums and cigars, wood carvings, jams and jellies, just to name a few items you will find in Bahamas. You will find most of the boutique shopping in Nassau, New Providence. Below is a sampling of things to purchase and where, for your souvenir pleasure:

Travel Triangle Blog – Shopping in Bahamas

Things To Do

From beach lounging to snorkeling, diving, just about any water sport, exploring, taking in the culture or just relaxing with a cool drink, there are a plethora of things to see and do in the Bahamas. Below, I’m including some links to give you more specific details to some of the most popular things to be seen and done in the Bahamas:

Nassau Paradise Island – Things to Do and Shopping

 Travel News US – Bahamas

: As I mentioned in the beginning of this article, planning to visit the Bahamas is one way to contribute to helping them rebuild their devastated islands. I came across this short article on 14 islands in the Bahamas that are up and running and eager to welcome visitors. If you’re not in the market for a visit right now, there is also a place on the bottom of the post that offers people to donate to help with the rebuild of the Bahamas.

Discover more about the Islands and all they have to offer: The Bahamas – Blog

Cheers!

I hope you enjoyed this edition of The Travel Column. If any of you have been to the Bahamas and would like to add to the conversation with your discoveries, please share with us here.

My thanks to Debby for another interesting and informative column and I hope you will join us again in the sunshine next time.

Debby Gies is a Canadian nonfiction/memoir author who writes under the pen name of D.G. Kaye. She was born, raised, and resides in Toronto, Canada. Kaye writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

D.G. writes to inspire others. Her writing encompasses stories taken from events she encountered in her own life, and she shares the lessons taken from them. Her sunny outlook on life developed from learning to overcome challenges in her life, and finding the upside from those situations, while practicing gratitude for all the positives.

When Kaye isn’t writing intimate memoirs, she brings her natural sense of humor into her other works. She loves to laugh and self- medicate with a daily dose of humor.

I love to tell stories that have lessons in them, and hope to empower others by sharing my own experiences. I write raw and honest about my own experiences, hoping through my writing, that others can relate and find that there is always a choice to move from a negative space, and look for the positive.

Quotes:

“Live Laugh Love . . . And Don’t Forget to Breathe!”

“For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

Books by D.G. Kaye

One of the reviews for Have Bags Will Travel

marjorie mallon5.0 out of 5 stars A fun travel/shopping memoir which will have you laughing Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 21 February 2021

This is such a hoot, what a laugh!

Have Bags Will Travel is such an entertaining read which gives you an insight into D G Kaye’s character, her shopping obsession, packing troubles, germaphobia, and brushes with airport security. Enjoy her recollections on the glamour and glitz, her love to travel and a nostalgic aspect to it all.

Her friend Zan shares her shopaholic tendencies too. The two of them together… can you imagine? A red head, blonde explosion of zaniness! I love the part when they end up at Buckingham Palace and chat to a Beefeater, the royal guard and after which… it gets funnier by the moment.

Have Bags Will Travel gives a historical account of how much easier it used to be to take overstuffed baggage through airports in the good old days. Now, it seems that D G Kaye will resort to anything to get her shopping home.

Zan and D G Kaye also travel to Paris and end up shopping for shoes!

There are manmade toboggan rides in Muskoka, Canada.

Trips to Venezuela: Margarita Island and Caracas with cousin Eileen.

Las Vegas, Then and Now – gambling/casinos, fond memories of the author’s love of the desert.

Have Bags Will Travel is just what we need right now, a good giggle! There is also a section at the back of the book with Helpful Travel tips.

A short, entertaining read. Highly recommended, especially for the shopoholics and travel enthusiasts in your life!

Read all the reviews and buy the books: Amazon US – and: Amazon UK – follow Debby: Goodreads – Blog: D.G. Kaye Writer – About me: D.G. Kaye – Twitter: @pokercubster Linkedin: D.G. Kaye – Facebook: D.G. Kaye – Instagram: D.G. Kaye – Pinterest: D.G. Kaye


 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Travel Column Rewind with D.G. Kaye – #Caribbean – St. Barts.


Welcome back to my Travel Column where I share facts about some of the interesting places I’ve traveled, and some new places I’d like to travel to. I hope you’re all enjoying your summer. As we get ready to venture into a new season, there are plenty of beautiful places you will discover in this series, and some I too have yet to visit.

I’ve written about a few islands in the Caribbean so far, and today I want to continue the Caribbean theme and take us all to Saint Barthelemy, or the often abbreviated, St. Barths, the French prefer to call it, and, St. Barts in English.

As always please check on any travel restrictions by visiting the Official St. Barts Tourism site
St. Barts is a small volcanic island, encircled by shallow reefs, and is one of four territories that make up what’s called the Leeward Islands, located in the northwest of the Caribbean Sea, lying approximately 22 miles southeast of St. Martin and just north of St. Kitts. The capital city of St Barts is Gustavia, named after a Swedish King. The other three islands part of these territories are: Martinique, French West Indies, and Guadeloupe.

St. Barts is a French-speaking island that is renowned as an elite destination most popular to the rich and famous, but certainly not limited to just the rich and famous. The island is most known for its beautiful beaches, luxury yachts and of course, designer boutiques and spectacular restaurants. St. Barts is considered one of the safest islands with very little to zero crime!

There are three methods of which to arrive in St. Barts. The first is truly geared toward the rich or famous, arrive by yacht, or take a ferry from another island. The other option is to fly into St. Martin and take a small prop plane a short 10 – minute flight into the St. Barts landing strip, most likely the method I would choose.

Check out the video below to see the landing strip and a bit more history and overview of the island:

A Bit of History

St. Barts covers an area of just short of ten square miles and a population of just over 8,000 people. It was a Swedish colony for almost a century. In 1784, Louis XVI traded the island to Sweden in exchange for trading rights in Gothenberg. In 1878 France re-purchased the island. To this day, the Swedish national arms and its three crowns still appear on St. Barts’ coat of arms.
In early history, before the European takeover of many of the Caribbean islands prior to the 15th century, the Taino (indigenous peoples of the Caribbean ), and the Arawak (indigenous peoples of South America) were the prime inhabitors of most of the Caribbean islands. Prior to France taking over, St. Barts’ original name was Ouanalao. Columbus first encountered the island in 1493. The next 100 years would pass until the island was formally colonized.

By 1648, the French settled on the island, lasting a mere 8 years before the settlement was attacked by the Caribs, causing a brief abandonment of the island. Five years later St. Barts was bought back by the French. The island didn’t prove to be very successful or valuable and was often pirated, and once attacked by the British. This prompted Louis XVI to sell it to Sweden in return for trade access in Gothenberg, Sweden. The island became a free trading port for Europeans.

In the late 1700s, slavery was common on the island and continued well into the mid 1800s until the slaves were freed. The slaves suffered severe economic hardships because the island had no plantations. In 1852, a devastating hurricane hit the island, followed not long after by a massive fire. The Swedes decided the island wasn’t worthy of much, so decided to sell it back to France in 1878, when it became an archipelago of Guadeloupe (a French commune, forming part of Guadeloupe which was the overseas region and department of France). It wasn’t until March of 1946 that the people became French citizens with full rights.

The island offered few economic prospects and many had to take jobs on neighboring islands to get by until the 60s and 70s rolled around and the idea of tourism came, building a few hotels and a narrow landing strip on the island – big enough to accommodate a mid-sized aircraft. The island soon became known as a luxurious island for many old movie stars to stow away to for vacationing without being hounded by paparazzi. Tourism and the rapid resulting growth of the island’s economy soared, making St. Barts become a unique island with a rise in living standard, resulting in ultimate modernization, still coveted by the rich and famous. In a 2003 referendum, the residents of St, Barts wished to separate from the jurisdiction of Guadeloupe, and in 2007 they got their wish. The island of St. Barthelemy became an overseas collectivity (OCM). A governing council was elected providing the island with a degree of autonomy and a senator in Paris represents the island. The island currently retains its free port status, and in 2012, St. Barthelemy ceased being an ‘outermost region’ by leaving the EU.

Climate

The island is mostly a dry climate from December through April, with the exception of the rainy season – typically May through November with an average of 39 inches of rainfall. Despite the rainfall, there is typically sunshine throughout the year with average temps hovering up to 90 degrees during the day and mid 70s in the evenings. There isn’t much humidity thanks to the light winds.

Currency

The Euro is the mainstay currency of the island, but U.S. dollars are also accepted. Because the island is touted as a ‘luxury island’, it is quite pricey to visit, but rates do plummet quite a bit during the off- season months. Travelers recommend best rates from April through June. The island’s economy is based on tourism and it is a duty-free island, so although many of the boutiques you can shop at, although designer with designer price tags- it’s duty-free which will be considerably cheaper than at home.

Tourism

St. Barts attracts approximately 200,000 visitors per year. The wealth generated by investors on the island is responsible for the high standard of living. Most of the food on the island is imported from both U.S and France.

There are approximately only 25 hotels on the island, with most of them having on average 12- 15 rooms available. Most other accommodations available are villas to rent. For more accommodation information, check out this link.

Getting Around

Most hotels offer free round trip pickup and drop offs to and from the landing strip airport. To get around the island, most rent cars as it’s been said that taxis are not plentiful.

Cuisine

The island boasts over 70 restaurants – many of them gourmet cuisine. Common cuisine you will find there are: French, West Indian, Creole, Italian, and Asian.

Health Services

St. Barts has a small hospital and a diagnostic lab in Gustavia as well as doctors specializing in many capacities, and several pharmacies. For patients requiring more serious issues they travel to Guadeloupe, San Juan or France.

Beaches

St. Barts hosts 14 public white sand beaches. Nudism is prohibited, but topless is very common. Shell Island, to name one, is one of 4 unique beaches in the world, loaded with beautiful shells. To have a look at some of these beautiful beaches and their locations on the island, please click HERE

Find a beautiful overview of the island below:

Fun Facts

St. Barts hosts many festivals annually. You will find a complete list of festivals and dates HERE

It is customary to say hello to fellow islanders when passing.

Nobody honks their car horns – it’s considered rude.

For more information on St. Barts, visit the links below.

Travel US News St. Barts
Travel and Leisure St. Barts

©D.G.Kaye 2019

Thanks Debby for all that information and I would be very happy to have a couple of weeks there right now.. anyone want to join us?

Debby Gies is a Canadian nonfiction/memoir author who writes under the pen name of D.G. Kaye. She was born, raised, and resides in Toronto, Canada. Kaye writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

D.G. writes to inspire others. Her writing encompasses stories taken from events she encountered in her own life, and she shares the lessons taken from them. Her sunny outlook on life developed from learning to overcome challenges in her life, and finding the upside from those situations, while practicing gratitude for all the positives.

When Kaye isn’t writing intimate memoirs, she brings her natural sense of humor into her other works. She loves to laugh and self- medicate with a daily dose of humor.

I love to tell stories that have lessons in them, and hope to empower others by sharing my own experiences. I write raw and honest about my own experiences, hoping through my writing, that others can relate and find that there is always a choice to move from a negative space, and look for the positive.

Quotes:

“Live Laugh Love . . . And Don’t Forget to Breathe!”

“For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

Books by D.G. Kaye

One of the reviews for Have Bags Will Travel

marjorie mallon5.0 out of 5 stars A fun travel/shopping memoir which will have you laughing Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 21 February 2021

This is such a hoot, what a laugh!

Have Bags Will Travel is such an entertaining read which gives you an insight into D G Kaye’s character, her shopping obsession, packing troubles, germaphobia, and brushes with airport security. Enjoy her recollections on the glamour and glitz, her love to travel and a nostalgic aspect to it all.

Her friend Zan shares her shopaholic tendencies too. The two of them together… can you imagine? A red head, blonde explosion of zaniness! I love the part when they end up at Buckingham Palace and chat to a Beefeater, the royal guard and after which… it gets funnier by the moment.

Have Bags Will Travel gives a historical account of how much easier it used to be to take overstuffed baggage through airports in the good old days. Now, it seems that D G Kaye will resort to anything to get her shopping home.

Zan and D G Kaye also travel to Paris and end up shopping for shoes!

There are manmade toboggan rides in Muskoka, Canada.

Trips to Venezuela: Margarita Island and Caracas with cousin Eileen.

Las Vegas, Then and Now – gambling/casinos, fond memories of the author’s love of the desert.

Have Bags Will Travel is just what we need right now, a good giggle! There is also a section at the back of the book with Helpful Travel tips.

A short, entertaining read. Highly recommended, especially for the shopoholics and travel enthusiasts in your life!

Read all the reviews and buy the books: Amazon US – and: Amazon UK – follow Debby: Goodreads – Blog: D.G. Kaye Writer – About me: D.G. Kaye – Twitter: @pokercubster Linkedin: D.G. Kaye – Facebook: D.G. Kaye – Instagram: D.G. Kaye – Pinterest: D.G. Kaye


 

Smorgasbord Laughter is the Best Medicine – Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Door maintenance and Miracles


Firstly, some funnies from Debby Gies followed by some funnies from Sally. Thanks to those who share the funnies on the internet.

D.G. Writes is where you will find an archive full of wonderful posts across several subjects including writing tips, social issues and book reviews.

My thanks to Debby for excellent foraging

D. G. Kaye – Buy: Amazon US And: Amazon UK Blog: D.G. WritesGoodreads: D.G. Kaye on Goodreads – Twitter: @pokercubster

Check out Debby’s latest Travel Column: San Juan

Now for some fun from Sally….

The oldest profession

A physician, an engineer, and an attorney were discussing who among them belonged to the oldest of the three professions represented.

The physician said, “Remember that, on the sixth day, God took a rib from Adam and fashioned Eve, making him the first surgeon. Therefore, medicine is the oldest profession.”

The engineer replied, “But, before that, God created the heavens and earth from chaos and confusion, and thus he was the first engineer. Therefore, engineering is an older profession than medicine.”

Then, the lawyer spoke up, “Yes, but who do you think created all of the chaos and confusion?”

Miracles

A fifteen year old Amish boy and his father were in a mall. They were amazed by almost everything they saw, but especially by two shiny, silver walls that could move apart and then slide back together again. The boy asked, “What is this Father?” The father (never having seen an elevator) responded, “Son, I have never seen anything like this in my life, I don’t know what it is.”

While the boy and his father were watching with amazement, a fat old lady in a wheel chair moved up to the moving walls and pressed a button. The walls opened, and the lady rolled between them into a small room. The walls closed, and the boy and his father watched the small numbers above the walls light up sequentially. They continued to watch until it reached the last number, and then the numbers began to light in the reverse order. Finally the walls opened up again and a gorgeous 24-year-old blond stepped out.

The father, not taking his eyes off the young woman, said quietly to his son… “Go get your Mother.”

Thank you for joining us today and we hope you are leaving with a smile on your face.. Debby and Sally.

Smorgasbord Laughter is the Best Medicine – Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Flying and Even more Weird Facts


Firstly, some funnies from Debby Gies followed by some funnies from Sally. Thanks to those who share the funnies on the internet.

D.G. Writes is where you will find an archive full of wonderful posts across several subjects including writing tips, social issues and book reviews.

  My thanks to Debby for excellent foraging

D. G. Kaye – Buy: Amazon US And: Amazon UK Blog: D.G. WritesGoodreads: D.G. Kaye on Goodreads – Twitter: @pokercubster

Check out Debby’s latest Travel Column: San Juan

Now for some fun from Sally….

More weird facts… some of which I can neither confirm or deny!

  1. 45% of Americans don’t know that the sun is a star.
  2. By age sixty, most people have lost half of their taste buds.
  3. Despite accounting for just one-fiftieth of body weight, the brain burns as much as one-fifth of our daily caloric intake.
  4. Fluoridated toothpaste came about as the result of a discovery made in Naples, Italy in 1802, when local dentists noticed yellowish-brown spots on their patient’s teeth – but no cavities. Subsequent examination revealed that high levels of fluoride in the water caused the spots and prevented tooth decay, and that less fluoride protected teeth without causing the spots. It took a while for the discovery to be implemented; the first U.S. fluoridated water tests didn’t take place until 1915, and Crest, the firth toothpaste with fluoride in it didn’t hit stores until 1956.
  5. People who laugh a lot are much healthier than those who don’t. Dr. Lee Berk at the Loma Linda School of Public Health in California found that laughing lowers levels of stress hormones, and strengthens the immune system. Six-year-olds have it best – they laugh an average of 300 times a day. Adults only laugh 15 to 100 times a day.
  6. The first known heart medicine was discovered in an English garden. In 1799, physician John Ferriar noted the effect of dried leaves of the common plant, digitalis purpurea, on heart action. Still used in heart medications, digitalis slows the pulse and increases the force of heart contractions and the amount of blood pumped per heartbeat.
  7. The kidneys filter about 500 gallons of blood each day.
  8. The human kidney consists of over 1 million little tubes with a total length of about 40 miles in both kidneys.
  9. The number one cause of blindness in the United States is diabetes.
  10. The most common non-contagious disease in the world is tooth decay.
  11. There are 10 trillion living cells in the human body.
  12. Every hour one billion cells in the body must be replaced.
  13. You can see a candle flame from 50 Kilometres on a clear, dark night. You can hear the tick of a watch from 6 meters in very quiet conditions. You can taste one gram of salt in 500 litres of water (.0001M). You can detect one drop of perfume diffused throughout a three-room apartment. You can detect the wing of a bee falling on your cheek from a height of one centimetre.
  14. Lightning keeps plants alive. The intense heat of lightning forces nitrogen in the air to mix with oxygen, forming nitrogen oxides that are soluble in water and fall to the ground in rain. Plants need nitrates to survive, so without lightning, plants could not live.
  15. Oak trees do not have acorns until they are fifty years old or older.
  16. The giant sequoia, which produces millions of seeds, can take 175 to 200 years to flower. No other organism takes this long to mature sexually.
  17. The primary purpose of growing rice in flooded paddies is to drown the weeds surrounding the young seedlings. Rice can, in fact, be grown in drained areas.
  18. 75-90% of primary physician visits are due to stress
  19. 1 out of every 4 kids in the USA is overweight
  20. Each year in America there are about 325,000 deaths that can be attributed to obesity.
  21. Eating chocolate three times a month helps people live longer as opposed to people who overeat chocolate or do not eat chocolate at all!

Thank you for joining us today and we hope you are leaving with a smile on your face.. Debby and Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Weekly Round Up – June 6th – 12th 2022 – Chart hits 1996, Puerto Rico, Phosphorus, Reviews, Poetry, Health, Podcast, Stories and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed during the week..

I hope you have had a good week and are enjoying the weekend. There has been some more work on the house and it is really beginning to take shape… Ironic that we will get it looking great only to pass on to someone else lol.. Anyway that is a month or so away but I am already looking at property pages in the areas we are planning to look at seriously in the coming months. I am trying to be sensible about downsizing!!!  Apart from anything else with heating oil having almost tripled in the last three months, heating a large house becomes an expensive luxury.

I am hoping that are luck with finding just the right house for us will hold, and whilst I am not looking forward to the packing up process, I am excited about finding our next home, intended to be our last. And also to finally welcome a new dog into the family, long overdue.

This week my friends William Price King, Debby Gies and Carol Taylor have given us music, sunshine and sea in Puerto Rico and wonderful recipes and I cannot thank them enough for their wonderful contributions. They are also busy on their own blogs and I hope you will head over to check them out.

William Price King joined me on The Breakfast show this week for the second part of the hits from 1996 and for the fianl part of the series about Aretha Franklin.  Next Friday a new series featuring Roberta Flack… You can also find William – Blog– IMPROVISATION– William Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies took us to San Juan on Monday and found some great funnies. It was also her birthday this week… on facebook it shows up as 107.. always a talking point as she certainly does not look her age lol..Over on her blog you can you can catch up with her posts including her Sunday book review for the compelling thriller Where There’s Doubt by Terry Tyler…. D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor joined me on Wednesday with her recipes to include sufficient phosphorus in our diets… and as always a busy week on her own blog including her Monday Musings and the Queen’s Jubilee celebrations, Store cupboard Basics, Green Kitchen Bread Rolls and strawberry stems, Saturday Snippets all about ‘Spin’. You can find all her posts Carol Cooks2

Thanks too for all your visits, comments and shares this week… they mean a great deal..♥

Coming up this week on the I Wish I Knew Then series are Sue Wickstead, Jane Risdon and Claire Fullerton.

On with the show…..

 

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 1996 Part Two – The Wallflowers, Alanis Morissette, Take That, Eric Clapton

William Price King meets the Music Legends – Aretha Franklin – Greatest Hits

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Travel Column Rewind with D.G. Kaye – San Juan, Puerto Rico

Cook from Scratch to prevent nutritional deficiency with Sally Cronin and Carol Taylor – Phosphorus – Dairy, Poultry, Pork, Nuts, Wholegrains

Food Therapy Rewind- Make the most of Summer – Homemade #Fruit Salad and Smoothies by Sally Cronin

Chapter Sixteen – Killbilly Hotel – A promotion

Killbilly Hotel – The Opening Weekend Party

Tuesday Weekly Challenge #Colour #Etheree – Strawberries by Sally Cronin

The Royal Banquet – Preparation and Menu by Sally Cronin

 

 

#Children’s – Make Believe: Bedtime Stories for Children by Janice Spina

Advance Review – #Malaya #1950s – Have You Eaten Rice Today by Apple Gidley

#Life – I Wish I Knew Then What I Know Now! by Carol Taylor

#Life – I Wish I Knew Then What I Know Now! by Diana Peach

#Life – I Wish I Knew Then What I Know Now! by Sharon Marchisello

First in Series – #Family Saga Judith Barrow, #Mystery N.A. Granger

#Thriller John W. Howell, #Mystery #Romance Marcia Meara

#Fantasy C.S. Boyack, #Fantasy D.Wallace Peach

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Age and Skipping

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Street signs and Diet Pills

 

Thank you for joining me this week and look forward to seeing you again soon  Sally.

Smorgasbord Laughter is the Best Medicine – Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Street signs and Diet Pills


Firstly, some funnies from Debby Gies followed by some funnies from Sally. Thanks to those who share the funnies on the internet.

D.G. Writes is where you will find an archive full of wonderful posts across several subjects including writing tips, social issues and book reviews.

My thanks to Debby for excellent foraging

D. G. Kaye – Buy: Amazon US And: Amazon UK Blog: D.G. WritesGoodreads: D.G. Kaye on Goodreads – Twitter: @pokercubster

Check out Debby’s latest Travel Column: St. Kitts

Now for some funnies from Sally….

Age memoire…

How old are you Grandma?’ asked little Rebecca.

‘Oh, I don’t know dear,’ said Grandma with a smile. ‘I’ve had so many birthdays, I’ve lost count!’

‘Well, why don’t you look in your knickers,’ said Rebecca. ‘Mine say three to four years old.’

Psychiatry

A young man laboured under the delusion that he was a Yorkshire terrier. His friends persuaded him to seek professional help and he went to a psychiatrist for a course of treatment.

Some weeks later, he met one of his friends in the street. ‘And how are things now?’ asked his friend. ‘Did the psychiatrist cure you?’

‘Oh yes,’ said the young man. ‘I’m quite okay now. Fit as a fiddle – here, feel my nose.’

Diet Pills

‘I’m prescribing these pills for you,’ said the doctor to the grossly overweight patient, who tipped the scales at 300lbs.

‘I don’t want you to swallow them. Just spill them on the floor twice a day and pick them up one at a time.’

Thank you for joining us today and we hope you are leaving with a smile on your face.. Debby and Sally.