Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – 4th – 10th November 2019 – Books, Reviews, Videos, Health and Humour


Welcome to the weekly round up of posts you might have missed this week on Smorgasbord.

We arrived back from two weeks in the UK on Thursday in slightly rougher sees than we might have liked but you can expect this in November. My two sisters had been on the Ventura for a cruise down to Portugal and back and they certainly had much rougher seas than we did and in fact it made the papers when a passenger shared a video of the water exiting one of the swimming pools and flooding a lounge. Both my sisters are good sailors and very little seems to phase them… they thought it was a storm in a teacup!!!

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7650639/Cruise-ship-passengers-carry-drinking-eating-torrent-water-surges-feet.html

Anyway, it has taken a couple of days to catch up online as I was off more than I was on during our time away. It gave me time to get some reading done and expect some reviews over the next couple of weeks. I also began plotting out the direction that the blog will take next year and how I can increase author and blogger promotions. There will be more reviews on a more regular basis and there will be a return of the Posts from Your Archives series for both new bloggers and those of you more established.

This week sees the start of the last major outside projects with the removal of the old broken down fence between us and our neighbour’s garden and a brand new post and concrete wall, making the garden fully child and dog safe for the next owners of the house.

A couple more inside jobs and then in the spring the house goes on the market and we shall be off further down the coast between Wexford and Waterford, two historic cities with a great deal of cultural appeal and great amenities.

Highlights of the coming week.

There will be the usual Cafe and Bookstore updates with recent reviews and several new books on the shelves. The Blogger Daily will resume and plenty of fun with afternoon videos and funnies.

MondayThe Travel Column by D.G. Kaye and this month Debby is taking us to the lovely not-so-well known little gem of a place, Puerto Peñasco, for a tropical escape in Mexico.

Tuesday – William Price King shares the life and music of jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman.

Wednesday – Carol Taylor and I join forces to share the mineral Manganese and some recipes to include regularly in your diet to ensure that you do not become deficient.

Thursday – our Italian food expert Silvia Todesco shares a wonderful almond dessert that would be perfect for Thanksgiving.

Friday The Smorgasbord Christmas Book Fair kicks off with a selection of children’s books in the Cafe and the first of the guest posts. D.G. Kaye will be sharing her expertise in writing memoirs.

The Weekend – Another post from Mike Biles about Britain’s history and Allan Hudson joins me for the Sunday Author Interview. There will also be two more stories from my Flights of Fancy Collection.

Time for the review of this past week’s posts.

This week Mike Biles lifts the lid and reveals the truth about one of my favourite books and television series as a child..Lorna Doone…

Lorna Doone a Romance of Exmoor, R D Blackmore, London & Glasgow, Collins clear type press

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/09/smorgasbord-blog-magazine-guest-writer-mike-biles-a-bit-about-britain-the-dastardly-shooting-of-lorna-doone-history/

My guest this week is multi-genre  bestselling author P.C. Zick who shares the inspiration behind her popular Crandall Family Series and what we can look forward to later this year.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/10/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-sunday-interview-and-new-book-on-the-shelves-love-on-course-by-p-c-zick/

My review for the latest book by Frank Prem – The New Asylum

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/04/smorgasbord-book-reviews-poetry-the-new-asylum-by-frank-prem/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/05/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-book-on-the-shelves-my-review-passport-to-death-by-yigal-zur/

I have put together a pdf of the recent book marketing series so that you have all in one place. It is free and the content page and email is in the post.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/09/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-the-book-marketing-series-by-sally-cronin-free-pdf/

It is remembrance Sunday and as it was Poet’s Choice this week on Colleen Chesebro’s Tanka challenge… I have written a double etheree ‘Young Soldiers’. I also wrote a Haiku for the header.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/10/smorgasbord-poetry-colleen-chesebros-tuesday-tanka-challenge-152-double-etheree-young-soldiers-by-sally-cronin/

Two more stories from the Flights of Fancy collection and Free book offer.

A combination of language issues and an unhappy marriage offer a parrot the chance to put things right!

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/09/flights-of-fancy-serialisation-fantasy-the-psychic-parrot-by-sally-cronin-and-a-free-book-offer/

An old woman reflects on her life using the changing colours of her bedroom curtains to tell her story.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/10/flights-of-fancy-serialisation-wartime-romance-curtains-by-sally-cronin-free-book-offer/

 

New Book on the Shelves

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/06/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-book-on-the-shelves-a-new-life-in-ventis-science-fiction-steampunk-adventure-by-richard-dee/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/07/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-book-on-the-shelves-googling-old-boyfriends-book-7-camilla-randall-mysteries-by-anne-r-allen/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/08/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-book-on-the-shelves-a-z-of-dumfries-places-people-history-by-mary-smith-and-photographs-by-keith-kirk/

Author Updates

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/04/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-reviews-stevie-turner-terry-tyler-and-teagan-riordain-geneviene/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/08/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-reviewsvictoria-zigler-fiona-tarr-and-barbara-silkstone/

My go to recipe to bring as many nutrients together on one plate – Brown rice pilaf

DSC_1207aw

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/06/smorgasbord-health-column-cook-from-scratch-multi-vitamin-on-a-plate-brown-rice-pilaf-sally-cronin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/05/smorgasbord-laughter-lines-comedian-in-residence-d-g-kaye-and-a-joke-from-sallys-archives-2-3/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/11/07/smorgasbord-laughter-lines-comedian-in-residence-d-g-kaye-and-a-joke-or-two-from-sallys-archives-2/

Thank you very much for dropping in this week to like, comment and share.. I am so appreciative of the support. Thanks Sally

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Guest Writer Mike Biles – A Bit About Britain – The dastardly shooting of Lorna (Doone) #History


Delighted to welcome Mike Biles, author of A Bit About Britain’s History as a guest writer until the end of the year.  This week Mike lifts the lid and reveals the truth about one of my favourite books and television series as a child..Lorna Doone…

The dastardly shooting of Lorna (Doone)

St Mary's Church, Oare, Exmoor, Somerset

The Victorian novel, “Lorna Doone – a Romance of Exmoor”, is generally assumed to be a work of fiction, set in a stunning location on the borders of Devon and Somerset and against the turbulent historical backdrop of the Monmouth Rebellion of 1685. Yet some believe that the author, R D Blackmore, drew upon illusive tales of real people who once lived, fought, loved and died in his beloved Exmoor. The book is seen through the eyes of honest young farmer John Ridd, and tells the story of his love for the beautiful and mysterious Lorna, whom everyone believes to be the granddaughter of Sir Ensor Doone. The Doones are a vicious, brutal, gang who terrorise the neighbourhood, robbing, murdering and extorting. John – or ‘Jan’ in West Country dialect – after many adventures eventually defeats the Doones and wins his bride. But the menacing and jealous Carver Doone is still on the loose. Seeking revenge, he makes his way to Oare church on the happy couple’s wedding day – and shoots Lorna.

Lorna Doone, Oare Church, Somerset

“It is impossible for any who have not loved as I have to conceive my joy and pride, when after ring and all was done, and the parson had blessed us, Lorna turned to look at me with her glances of subtle fun subdued by this great act.

Her eyes, which none on earth may ever equal, or compare with, told me such a depth of comfort, yet awaiting further commune, that I was almost amazed, thoroughly as I knew them. Darling eyes, the sweetest eyes, the loveliest, the most loving eyes – the sound of a shot rang through the church and those eyes were filled with death.

Lorna fell across my knees when I was going to kiss her, as the bridegroom is allowed to do, and encouraged, if he needs it; a flood of blood came out upon the yellow wood of the altar steps, and at my feet lay Lorna, trying to tell me some last message out of her faithful eyes. I lifted her up, and petted her, and coaxed her, but it was no good; the only sign of life remaining was a spirt of bright red blood.”

Oare Church, Somerset, Lorna Doone

So you can’t possibly visit Exmoor without going to St Mary’s in Oare, where this terrible and dramatic act is supposed to have happened (in the book). We were staying with our friend Paul, who generously undertook all the driving as we rattled along slender lanes at the bottom of deep combes, a couple of miles inland somewhere between Bagworthy and Countisbury. Fortunately, there was no other traffic. A red doe (a deer, a female deer…) leapt in front of us and scrabbled in panic up the wooded slope on the other side of the track. Stupidly, we’d left the decent map behind and I was trying to see where we were on an inadequate small-scale road atlas, whilst simultaneously playfully head-butting Paul’s roof. Then we were on it, an ancient diminutive stone affair on a bank above a sunken lane with a distinctive, whitewashed, porch.

Oare Church, Exmoor, Somerset

House martins had built their nest inside the ridge of the porch roof and looked down nervously as we creaked open the door. It is a peaceful, simple, church, lined with box pews. The nave is believed to be 15th century, the tower and the chancel added in the 19th century. Tiny now, at the time in which the novel was set it would have been even smaller, perhaps only accommodating a dozen or so worshippers. The window through which Carver Doone is meant to have fired his gun would have been unglazed in the 17th century. There’s a memorial to Richard Doddridge Blackmore (1825-1900) on the north wall; he is buried in Teddington. Outside, the setting was overcast, but just wonderful – and totally silent.

Oare Church on Exmoor, Lorna Doone

When we got home, I took down an old copy of “Lorna Doone”. It was amongst a collection of books that have been in the family for years, a lovely, small, red-bound thing with gilt lettering on the spine, published by Collins and with illustrations by Wilmot Lunt. There’s no date in it; I should imagine it was printed sometime in the 1920s or 30s, and doubt whether it had been opened for at least half a century. Intriguingly, there’s an unknown woman’s name written in the front – perhaps someone’s old girlfriend, long gone. In any event, not having ever read the full version, I thought I better had – particularly having visited Oare church. Besides, I wanted to know what happened – don’t you?

Lorna Doone a Romance of Exmoor, R D Blackmore, London & Glasgow, Collins clear type press

My copy of “Lorna Doone – a Romance of Exmoor” is charming. But it is also 640 pages of some of the most tortuous Victorian prose I have ever come across; RD Blackmore was certainly no Bernard Cornwell. I found myself getting incredibly frustrated on occasions with our hero, Jan Ridd, who not only seemed incapable of saying anything in one word when he had twenty at his disposal and, in so doing, in a round about kind of way, without wishing to prevaricate or obfuscate, and certainly not to overly use subordinate clauses, if you get my drift, often took a heck of a long time to get to the point. It also saddens me to say that Jan, for all his undoubted virtues, could sometimes be ponderously thick. That said, it is a great story – full of adventure, romance (of course), not without humour – and deservedly a classic. Though it’s been both filmed and televised numerous times, I don’t understand why there hasn’t been a more memorable or successful movie version. David Lean could have done something with it, but now I’m thinking it’s more Spielberg – or possibly Ron Howard or Tom Hanks; definitely not Tarantino. Will you contact them, or shall I?

Oh – you still don’t know what happened, do you? If you don’t want to know the result – look away now…

For the rest of you – Jan tracked wicked Carver Doone down to the moors where they fought. Carver was beat and then got accidentally sucked into the black bog, never to be seen again. Exhausted, Jan made his way home to find that, miraculously, Lorna had survived. And everyone lived happily ever after.

Statue, Lorna Doone, DulvertonOare Church, piscina, Exmoor
© Images Mike Biles 2019

A Bit about Britain’s History: From a long time ago to quite recently.

About the book

Could this short, elegant, volume be the only book on British history you’ll ever need?

A Bit About Britain’s History is for anyone who wants a serious, yet light, introduction to Britain’s amazing story. If you don’t know the basics, or would like a reminder, this book is for you. It is also perfect for those that didn’t enjoy history at school, but who have suddenly realised they’d like to understand it a bit better now.

What did the Romans achieve? How did Christianity arrive? Who are the English and why did they fight the French so often? What is Henry VIII’s greatest legacy? When did democracy start and people get the vote? Why on earth did Britain get involved in WW1?

Organised clearly and chronologically, A Bit About Britain’s History covers every period from a long time ago until quite recently. It begins by briefly mentioning that the place was once inhabited by extremely large lizards, and ends up with a post-war 20th century consumer society. Brief articles explain the essential aspects of Britain’s past, including how the ancestors of its current inhabitants arrived, how they fought each other, formed nations, fell out over religion, acquired a large empire, became gradually more democratic, helped win a couple of world wars and were left wondering what to do next. At the end of the book are detailed timelines for each period, which provide useful reference and make fascinating reading in their own right.

A Bit About Britain’s History might be the only book on British history you’ll ever need; or it might be your stepping stone to more in-depth academic reading

One of the recent reviews for the book on Goodreads

Sep 24, 2019 Susan Swiderski rated it four stars

Like most Americans, I had a rather rudimentary education about British history, so this book seemed the perfect antidote for that particular affliction. Indeed, it did fill in some gaps nicely, and what’s more, it did so with some delightful dollops of humor, (ahem… humour…) as well.

Do you have to be a history nerd to enjoy this book? No, of course not. (But it helps.) I particularly enjoyed reading the parts about more recent history… like from WWI on. It was interesting to get a fresh perspective (i.e. Brit point of view) on parts of history I was already fairly familiar with.

I must, however, confess that I skimmed over (i.e. skipped) the lengthy time line at the end of the book. I appreciate how much research and effort the author put into compiling it, but I chose not to read it. For me, it was kinda like skipping the “begats” in the Bible, ya know? (Something tells me I probably missed out on some really good chuckles by skipping it, though…

Read the reviews and buy the book in print and kindle: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mike-Biles/e/B07W928W23

And on Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Mike-Biles/e/B07W928W23

Follow Mike on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/19553725.Mike_Biles

About Mike Biles

Mike has lived in Britain all his life and generally loves the place, warts and all. He first learned history on his dad’s knee and went on to study medieval and modern British and European history at university. He was planning on teaching it, but then drifted into a career running his own business. Despite having worked with some of the UK’s most prestigious firms, he is often at his happiest with his nose in a history book, or exploring a historic site where the past is close. Several years ago, Mike began a blog – now an increasingly authoritative website – ‘A Bit About Britain’. He had to write a bit about Britain’s history for the website, and it seemed only sensible to put the material into his first book, ‘A Bit About Britain’s History’.

Connect to Mike Biles and explore his wonderful archives

Website home pagehttp://bitaboutbritain.com/
Blog pagehttp://bitaboutbritain.com/blog-2/
Facebook pagehttps://www.facebook.com/bitaboutbritain/
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/bitaboutbritain
Pinteresthttps://www.pinterest.co.uk/bit1032/

My thanks to Mike for sharing the background and the location for this wonderful story, and I must have read an abridged version in the 1960s where Jan was given a better script…and a new film version would be wonderful..

Join Mike again next week for another glimpse into the history, people and places in Britain.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Guest Writer Mike Biles – A Bit About Britain- The George Inn at Borough #Southwark #History


Delighted to welcome Mike Biles, author of A Bit About Britain’s History as a guest writer until the end of the year. This week Mike shares the history of The George Inn at Borough the only surviving galleried coaching inn to be found in London.The original pub served customers in the reign of King Henry VIII.

George Inn, Southwark, Borough, SE1, coaching inn

I wonder how many pints of ale have been supped here? Let me see: if just twenty people drank a modest 4 pints every night, that would be, er, 29,200 pints a year – 2,920,000 for every century. But the revenue generated by that amount of beer would not be enough to make the place viable. So given that there has been an inn on the present site of the George Inn since medieval times, the mind boggles at how much alcohol and food has been consumed within its precincts over the centuries.

George Inn, old London pubs, Southwark

You can play this game at hundreds of pubs throughout Britain of course. Unlike several, the George does not claim to be the oldest pub in the land, but it is the only surviving galleried coaching inn to be found in London and therefore deserves a little respect. You’ll find it in Southwark, tucked away off Borough High Street and just a few minutes from London Bridge station. During the reign of Henry VIII it was called the St George – I idly wonder if this was anything to do with the parish of St George the Martyr nearby – and was probably known to, if not frequented by, William Shakespeare. The inn was badly damaged by fire in 1669 and then destroyed in the great fire that engulfed much of this part of Southwark in 1676. It was rebuilt, apparently on the same footprint, in 1677. Coaching inns of yesteryear provided so much more than merely food and drink for the weary traveller and, at one time, the George must have been huge, a building occupying three sides of a long galleried rectangle with a central courtyard where plays were performed and a gated frontage off the High Street.

Greene King, Abbot, George, London pubs

Southwark was once well-stocked with inns and hostelries of all sorts. Until 1729, London Bridge was the only bridge across the Thames east of Kingston. Travellers from the south up the old Roman Stane and Watling Streets converged in Southwark, and if they arrived at nightfall after curfew they needed somewhere to stay before entering London the following day. Merchants heading south would cross London Bridge before curfew, to avoid morning rush-hour, sleep over in Southwark and make an early start.

Dickens wrote in The Pickwick Papers (1836):

“In the Borough especially, there still remain some half dozen old inns, which have preserved their external features unchanged, and which have escaped alike the rage for public improvement, and the encroachments of private speculation. Great, rambling, queer, old places they are, with galleries, and passages, and staircases, wide enough and antiquated enough to furnish materials for a hundred ghost stories, supposing we should ever be reduced to the lamentable necessity of inventing any, and that the world should exist long enough to exhaust the innumerable veracious legends connected with old London Bridge, and its adjacent neighbourhood on the Surrey side.”

Dickens was about to introduce his readers to the celebrated White Hart Inn, which once stood immediately to the north of the George and which was demolished in 1881. The White Hart was allegedly used as a headquarters by the 15th century rebel leader Jack Cade. Immediately to the south of the George Inn stood an even more famous inn, the Tabard, which was allegedly doing business in the early 14th century. It was from here that Chaucer’s pilgrims gathered before setting off on their journey in the 1380s:

Bifil that in that seson on a day,
In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay,
Redy to wenden on my pilgrymage
To Caunterbury with ful devout corage,
At nyght were come into that hostelrye
Wel nyne-and-twenty in a compaignye,
Of sondry folk, by aventure y-falle
In felaweshipe, and pilgrimes were they alle,
That toward Caunterbury wolden ryde.
The chambers and the stables weren wyde,
And wel we weren esed atte beste.
And shortly, whan the sonne was to reste,
So had I spoken with hem everychon,
That I was of hir felaweshipe anon,
And made forward erly for to ryse,
To take oure wey, ther as I yow devyse.

Now it happened in that season one day,
In Southwark at the Tabard where I lay,
All ready to be on my way
To Canterbury with a very devout heart,
That there had come into that hostelry
At night some twenty-nine, a company
Of various people who by chance fell
Into fellowship, and they were all pilgrims
Who intended to ride to Canterbury.
The bedrooms and the stables were spacious
And were well accommodated in the best way.
And by the time the sun had gone to rest
I had so spoken to every one of them
That I was soon in their fellowship,
And we agreed to rise early
To make our way, as I will tell you.

The Tabard was renamed the Talbot and was demolished in 1873. Talbot Yard is next to the George Inn.

Many of the inns that once lined Borough High Street were rendered redundant by the arrival of the railway. Indeed, the Great Northern Railway Company demolished the north and east wings of the George in 1889, to make way for warehouses. Now, what remains of the place is safe in the ownership of the National Trust, who lease it out. At my last visit it served a rather pleasant Abbot Ale – I’m quite partial to Greene King – and there wasn’t a TV or slot machine in sight; perfect! So, tarry awhile amongst the wood panelling in this surviving relic of London’s past and contemplate all who have supped before you. Dickens certainly did – he mentions the George in Little Dorrit.

George Inn, Borough, historic pubs, London

I have discovered there’s a book about The George at Borough – “Shakespeare’s Local: Six Centuries of History Seen Through One Extraordinary Pub” – looks like it could be a fascinating read and is available from Amazon. It’s by Pete Brown

© Images Mike Biles 2019

A Bit about Britain’s History: From a long time ago to quite recently.

About the book

Could this short, elegant, volume be the only book on British history you’ll ever need?

A Bit About Britain’s History is for anyone who wants a serious, yet light, introduction to Britain’s amazing story. If you don’t know the basics, or would like a reminder, this book is for you. It is also perfect for those that didn’t enjoy history at school, but who have suddenly realised they’d like to understand it a bit better now.

What did the Romans achieve? How did Christianity arrive? Who are the English and why did they fight the French so often? What is Henry VIII’s greatest legacy? When did democracy start and people get the vote? Why on earth did Britain get involved in WW1?

Organised clearly and chronologically, A Bit About Britain’s History covers every period from a long time ago until quite recently. It begins by briefly mentioning that the place was once inhabited by extremely large lizards, and ends up with a post-war 20th century consumer society. Brief articles explain the essential aspects of Britain’s past, including how the ancestors of its current inhabitants arrived, how they fought each other, formed nations, fell out over religion, acquired a large empire, became gradually more democratic, helped win a couple of world wars and were left wondering what to do next. At the end of the book are detailed timelines for each period, which provide useful reference and make fascinating reading in their own right.

A Bit About Britain’s History might be the only book on British history you’ll ever need; or it might be your stepping stone to more in-depth academic reading

My review for the book on October 31st

A wonderfully succinct but rich timeline of British History.I loved history at school and more recently I explored our own family history as part of the Oxford Gene project in 2001 and then with Ancestry DNA. Not half as interesting or entertaining as A Bit About Britain’s History. Mike Biles has succeeded in bringing every major event from the formation of the land through to the present day in an easy to read and absorb timeline. And at the back of the book you will find a very useful section summarizing those key dates and events that have forged the ethnicity, culture, religion and alliances of modern day Britain.

Clearly painstakingly researched and compiled, there is nothing dry and dusty about this book as it brings hundreds of thousands of years of history to life. There were more than a few ‘I did not know that’ moments’, and two of those were the reasons behind the name ‘Redcoats’ for British soldiers and how the Coldstream Guards got their name.

Even if history has not been one of your passions, I do recommend that you read this book as it has all the elements of a murder mystery, political thriller and action packed historical novel. Add in some humour and it will both inform and entertain you.

Whether you are British, or one of the millions around the world with British roots, this book will give you a sense of pride, in both your origins, and the incredible challenges your ancestors had to survive in order for you to be here today.

Read the reviews and buy the book in print and kindle: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mike-Biles/e/B07W928W23

And on Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Mike-Biles/e/B07W928W23

Follow Mike on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/19553725.Mike_Biles

About Mike Biles

Mike has lived in Britain all his life and generally loves the place, warts and all. He first learned history on his dad’s knee and went on to study medieval and modern British and European history at university. He was planning on teaching it, but then drifted into a career running his own business. Despite having worked with some of the UK’s most prestigious firms, he is often at his happiest with his nose in a history book, or exploring a historic site where the past is close. Several years ago, Mike began a blog – now an increasingly authoritative website – ‘A Bit About Britain’. He had to write a bit about Britain’s history for the website, and it seemed only sensible to put the material into his first book, ‘A Bit About Britain’s History’.

Connect to Mike Biles

Website home pagehttp://bitaboutbritain.com/
Blog pagehttp://bitaboutbritain.com/blog-2/
Facebook pagehttps://www.facebook.com/bitaboutbritain/
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/bitaboutbritain
Pinteresthttps://www.pinterest.co.uk/bit1032/

 My thanks to Mike for sharing the history of this ancient watering hole..

Join Mike again next week for another glimpse into the history, people and places in Britain.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – AWOL – Benny Goodman – Magnesium – The Magic Carpet – Television Interviews and all that Jazz…


Welcome to the round up of posts that you might have missed this week on Smorgasbord.

On the news front I will be offline from this Thursday to Monday 28th October and for a few days in the first week in November. I have however left some posts for you… the regular book promotions and also some surprises.

Delighted to share the news of the start of a series by guest writer Mike Biles, author of A Bit About Britain’s History who will be joining us every Saturday until Christmas. His first post next Saturday is about the visit he made to author Rudyard Kipling’s home.

As Just an Odd Job Girl has now finished, I am starting a new serialisation, this time of my first short story collection from 2009, which has just received a lovely review. The first two stories from Flights of Fancy air next weekend.

And I would be grateful if you could pop in on Sunday when Eloise De Sousa will be my guest on the Sunday author Interview

I will be online again by Monday and will respond to any comments then… I will also catch up with any retweets etc on social media.

On with this week’s posts.

As always my thanks to the contributors and guest writers for the time and work that goes into preparing the posts for the blog and to you for keep coming back to read them.

William Price King shared the life and music of the renowned King of Swing, Benny Goodman.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/15/smorgasbord-blog-magazine-the-music-column-with-william-price-king-the-king-of-swing-benny-goodman/

Magnesium – Calcium’s BFF and a deficiency alert One of the minerals that most people focus on is calcium (the last column) but it is in fact magnesium or the lack of this mineral in our diet that may be the contributory factor in many of the diseases that we suffer from, particularly as we get older.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/16/smorgasbord-health-column-cook-from-scratch-to-prevent-nutritional-deficiencies-with-sally-cronin-and-carol-taylor-minerals-magnesium/

If you are a regular visitor to the blog you will be familiar with Jessica Norrie and her Literary Column which ran in 2018 and has enjoyed a revival this year too. We also get to enjoy an extract from Jessica’s latest release – The Magic Carpet

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/20/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-sunday-interview-jessica-norrie-with-an-extract-from-the-magic-carpet/

 Last week I covered the basics of the preparation needed before a radio and podcast interview  This week preparing for an interview on camera.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/19/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-book-marketing-for-authors-preparing-for-an-interview-on-camera-sally-cronin/

This week in the Colleen’s Tuesday Poetry Challenge 145 we are being asked to write in response to the photo prompt selected by last month’s winner of the challenge, Diana Wallace Peach.. I have composed a double Etheree – The Moonlight Concerto

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/16/smorgasbord-poetry-colleen-chesebros-tuesday-tanka-challenge-photoprompt-the-moonlight-concerto-by-sally-cronin/

This weekend the last two chapters of my novel Just an Odd Job Girl. A surprise visitor changes Imogen’s future.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/19/just-an-odd-job-girl-serialisation-chapter-nineteen-full-circle-by-sally-cronin/

The final chapter…a new life

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/19/just-an-odd-job-girl-serialisation-final-chapter-a-new-life-by-sally-cronin/

In the UK according to overall cancer statistics from Cancer Research UK there were 363,484 new cases in 2016, and 164,900 deaths in 2017. There is now a 50% survival rate over 10 years but, 38% of cancers are preventable.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/15/smorgasbord-health-column-major-organs-and-systems-of-the-body-female-reproductive-system-breast-cancer-by-sally-cronin/

This week I am share the the impact on a child’s body of a high sugar diet and lack of nutrition in relation to their brain development and hormone production as they head into puberty.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/17/smorgasbord-health-column-the-obesity-epidemic-part-four-finding-a-point-to-intervene-in-the-life-cycle-7-14-healthy-diet-for-brain-function-and-hormon/

In her final post Linda Thompson shares the sadness of loss. In this case when a relationship dies and we have to leave elements of our previous life behind. Thankfully most of us find another safe haven.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/14/smorgasbord-posts-from-your-archives-new-bloggers-on-the-scene-dreamcatcher-on-loss-divorce-by-linda-thompson/

New Book on the Shelves

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/14/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-book-on-the-shelves-non-fiction-creative-solutions-for-the-modern-writer-by-harmony-kent/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/15/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-book-on-the-shelves-non-fiction-writing-on-water-self-awareness-by-jane-sturgeon/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/16/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-book-on-the-shelves-pre-order-the-last-will-of-sven-anderson-the-harry-spittle-saga-book-2-by-geoff-le-pard-and-free-book-offer/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/17/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-book-on-the-shelves-children-molly-finds-her-purr-by-pamela-s-wight/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/18/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-book-on-the-shelves-ya-fantasy-through-the-nethergate-by-roberta-eaton-cheadle/

Author Update #reviews

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/14/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-reviews-teagan-riordain-geneviene-balroop-singh-bette-a-stevens-and-julia-benally/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/18/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-reviews-jacqui-murray-vandana-bhasin-and-smitha-vishwanath-anne-goodwin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/14/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-monday-14th-october-nicholas-rossis-bookblurb-charles-f-french-with-robbie-cheadle-1984-and-susannah-leonard-hill-halloween-childrens-story-competition/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/15/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-tuesday-october-15th-d-g-kaye-astralplaning-alex-forshaw-click-training-babies-andrew-petcher-instagram-and-tourist-attractions/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/16/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-wednesday-october-16th-beetley-pete-bookreview-mary-smith-afghanistan-janet-gogerty-essentials/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/17/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-thursday-17th-october-c-s-boyack-with-roberta-eaton-cheadle-carol-taylor-pumpkins-and-jack-eason-politicians/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/18/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-friday-18th-october-annika-perry-bookreview-bienvenue-press-flash-with-sharon-marchisello-and-joelle-legendre-insomnia-humour/

 

 

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/15/smorgasbord-laughter-lines-comedian-in-residence-d-g-kaye-and-a-joke-from-sallys-archives-13/

 

 

 

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/10/17/smorgasbord-laughter-lines-comedian-in-residence-d-g-kaye-and-a-joke-or-two-from-sally/

 

Thank you very much for dropping in and all your support this week. I hope you will pop in next week thanks Sally.