EDITING 101: 30 – Ellipses…


Time for our weekly grammar tutorial from Susan Uttendorfsky of Adirondack Editing who shares her expertise on the Story Reading Ape. This week one of the more interesting grammar terms to pronounce after a couple of glasses of wine… Ellipses… and if you are seeing dots its because…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy of Adirondack Editing

Ellipses

Ahh, another point of grammar that’s frequently either overused or incorrectly used. And, in this case, it’s understandable! There are so many different ways to use ellipses.

First, we’ll start with the punctuation mark itself. Some authors use three dots in a row…which Microsoft Word will typically convert into an ellipsis character. An ellipsis character only takes up one character space, and can be deleted by backspacing one time. This ellipsis is scrunched together more than if there were simply three period/full stop marks.

Other authors like to use a space in between . . . like this. It’s spread out more and I think it looks nicer. The problem is when it comes at the end of a sentence…

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Notes from a small dog – The gloating mole


Here is a report from Ani the Dog… Sue Vincent has need of cooling treatments and Ani whilst being her usual attentive hand maiden has taken it upon herself to get rid of products passed their sell by date..namely the……find out what by heading over and reading the post.

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

Frankly, there is no doing anything with her today.  It doesn’t take much to make her happy… give her an ice-cream, a five minute break from tennis-ball-throwing or a whiff of heather and she’s content. Not that she is getting any of those…. and not that she should have anything much to be happy about at present. She’s wandering around looking like a sunburnt mole again…and she has all week.

Her eyes are all hidden in the pink, puffy stuff she calls skin. Well, when I say all, I mean both of them.  Even she is not weird enough to have more than two, though you would think she must have some in the back of her head sometimes…’specially when the fridge is open… You know, if she wanted that cheese, you’d think she’d have eaten it by now…

She keeps going in the fridge, though. Not for cheese…just…

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The Writer and The Rake. Chapter one.


Coming soon another Smexy Historical hot off the press release from Shehanne Moore.. guaranteed no hamstahs! Shssssh don’t tell them they bite! Well done Shey.. look forward to showcasing..

shehanne moore

NOW DUDES  THAT IS NOT SO. What’s this then……

The Writer and The Rake. Chapter one the illustrated preview version.  Time Mutants series.

Chapter 1

Present Day. Dundee, Scotland.

If life was what happened as she dreamed, then what a bloody nightmare hers was right now. Flashlights pinged. “Sign this, Ms. Carter,” “Ms. Carter, over here,” “Brit-tany, Brit-tany,” screeched legions of adoring fans.

Some were trampled underfoot as she sashayed up stairs that dripped in red velvet, her carefully coiffed, exotically scented, chestnut hair framing her face, pink lips pouting, figure, slim as an ice pick in the little lime-green number she’d ordered from Saskia’s online. A snip at a thousand quid.

At least, in her fantasies people asked her for her autographs, her fans were being trampled and the dress cost that.

The truth?

Not even a mouse at her book signing in some shitty Scout hall.

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Time for some Laffs – Angels explained by children and out of the mouths of Babes


Angels as explained by Children – Tina Friscohttps://www.amazon.com/Tina-Frisco/e/B009NMOFNY  Children have a richer understanding of certain things than we do!

I only know the names of two angels. Hark and Harold. -Gregory, Age 5

Everybody’s got it all wrong. Angels don’t wear halos anymore. I forget why, but scientists are working on it. -Olive, Age 9

It’s not easy to become an angel! First, you die. Then you go to Heaven. And then there’s still the flight training to go through. And then you got to agree to wear those angel clothes. -Matthew, Age 9

Angels work for God and watch over kids when God has to go do something else. -Mitchell, Age 7

My guardian angel helps me with math, but he’s not much good for science. -Henry, Age 8

Angels don’t eat, but they drink milk from Holy Cows. -Jack, Age 6

Angels talk all the way while they’re flying you up to heaven. The main subject is where you went wrong before you got dead. -Daniel, Age 9

When an angel gets mad, she takes a deep breath and counts to ten. And when she lets out her breath again, somewhere there’s a tornado. -Reagan, Age 10

Angels have a lot to do and they keep very busy. If you lose a tooth, an angel comes in through your window and leaves money under your pillow. Then when it gets cold, angels go south for the winter. -Sara, Age 6

Angels live in cloud houses made by God and his Son, who’s a very good carpenter. -Jared, Age 8

All angels are girls because they gotta wear dresses, and boys didn’t go for it. -Antonio, Age 9

My angel is my grandma who died last year. She got a big head start on helping me while she was still down here on earth. -Ashley, Age 9

Some of the angels are in charge of helping heal sick animals and pets. And if they don’t make the animals get better, they help the child get over it. – Vicki, Age 8

What I don’t get about angels is why, when someone is in love, they shoot arrows at them. -Sarah, Age 7

Out of the mouths of babes!

A mother was telling her little girl what her own childhood was like: “We used to skate outside on a pond. I had a swing made from a tire; it hung from a tree in our front yard. We rode our pony. We picked wild raspberries in the woods.” The little girl was wide-eyed, taking this in. At last she said, “I sure wish I’d gotten to know you sooner!”

A mother and her young son returned from the grocery store and began putting away the groceries. The boy opened the box of animal crackers and spread them all over the table. “What are you doing?” his mother asked. “The box says you can’t eat them if the seal is broken,” the boy explained. “I’m looking for the seal.”

A number of primary schools were doing a project on ‘The Sea.’ Children were asked to draw pictures or write about their experiences. Teachers got together to compare the results and put together some of the ‘better’ ones:

Some fish are dangerous. Jellyfish can sting. Electric eels can give you a shock. They have to live in caves under the sea because I think they have to plug themselves in to chargers. (Christopher age 7)

This is a picture of an octopus. It has eight testicles. (Kelly age 6)

Oysters’ balls are called pearls. (James age 6)

If you are surrounded by sea you are an Island. If you don’t have sea all around you, you are incontinent. (Wayne age 7)

I think sharks are ugly and mean, and have big teeth, just like Emily Richardson. She’s not my friend no more. (Kyle age 6)

A dolphin breathes through an asshole on the top of its head. (Billy age 8 )

When ships had sails, they used to use the trade winds to cross the ocean. Sometimes, when the wind didn’t blow the sailors would whistle to make the wind come. My brother said they would be better off eating beans. (William age 7)

I like mermaids. They are beautiful, and I like their shiny tails. How do mermaids get pregnant? (Helen age 6)

Hope you have enjoyed and please feel free to pass on the smiles… thanks Sally

Meet Guest Author Stacy Gleiss…


Stacy Gleiss, author of The Six-Foot Bonzai has a story to tell that few of us have experienced. It must have taken a great deal of courage to break free and to be able to tell the story.. Please head over and read the whole post.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

stacy-gleissI live fully planted in the fertile soil of my native state; enjoying outdoor activities such as fishing, hunting and watching sunsets over Lake Michigan.  But I wasn’t always here. For many years my soul was elsewhere.  

I was born and raised in nowhere special. A rural Michigander, a real bumpkin whose feet were always black and leathery in the summer.  Culture to me was playing in the woods and streams…that is until a mysterious flyer about an exchange program appeared in our rural route mailbox. This little piece of paper brought a girl named Yuki to our house. The year was 1979 and she became my best friend whether she wanted to be or not.

This is how it all started for me. I was still in high school when I first traveled to Japan and it was mesmerizing. I had only known Japan from old encyclopedias and post war history…

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