Smorgasbord Health Column – Project 101 Resilience – How much do you get for your 1500 calories and Music Therapy – Sally Cronin


Project 101 – Resilience a reminder of the aim of the series.

Let me say upfront, that I cannot promise that what you will read over the next few weeks will prevent you catching a viral or bacterial infection, but what I would like to do is to encourage as many people as possible to take themselves out of the identified high risk categories by making some small changes to their lifestyle and diet.

One of the highest risks is to those over 70, particularly those who have underlying health problems. However, those health problems are predominantly lifestyle related and do not have to be for life. For example, Obesity, Type II Diabetes, Inflammatory diseases, nutritional deficiencies such as Vitamin D and High Blood Pressure.

I see a window of opportunity for all of us to review our health, diet and lifestyle and see where we can make improvements to boost our immune systems, reduce our risk factors and feel more confident about going back out into the world again. A chance to get our bodies fighting fit.

Over the last 20 years or so of working with 100s of clients as a nutritional therapist, I have discovered that making sweeping changes does not work. There are three elements that require attention, physical, mental and emotional, and making small but key changes in these areas is much more effective.

One of the areas that seems to cause the most confusion is calories...and yes they can be a pain to count each day but it is still one of the best ways to lose weight. Energy in and energy out.. too much of one or the other and your body does not run efficiently.

The key to healthy weight loss is to make sure that the calories that you do consume may be reduced by are nutrient dense

Getting the most out of your 1500 calories

I established in an earlier post that a woman needs a minimum daily intake of 1,500 calories and a man needs a minimum daily intake of 1,800 calories to provide sufficient calories and nutrition to run the body’s operating systems.

If you weigh 200lbs your body will require more calories per day to function – approximately 10 calories per pound. If your body requires 2000 calories per day and you eat 1500 calories you will create a deficit of 500 calories x 7 = 3500 calories per week, which is 1lb weight of body fat.

As an example at 330lbs I needed 3300 calories per day just to carry all that extra weight around. My initial programme allowed me to eat 2000 calories per day which was quite a lot of food (of the right kind). I lost an average of 3lbs a week once the initial water loss was completed.

If you only need to lose 10lbs you will find that in a moderately active day you will still be using 2000+ calories.. so by eating 1500 calories you will still be able to create a 500 calorie deficit which will be 1lb loss per week.

Always remember that the most important aspect of those calories should be the nutritional content.

Let’s look at two sample menus of around 1,500 calories.

Menu 1 – Bad example

• You could eat three chocolate bars, which would be 1,500 calories or around 60 fat grams.

OR, you could have ALL of the following;

Menu 2 – Good example

Breakfast

• Bowl of sugar free cereal such as porridge (30 g) with skimmed milk with a handful of blueberries (150 calories)
• Slice of toast with scrape of butter and jam or marmalade (130 calories)
• Cup of black coffee or green tea and a small glass of cranberry juice (50 calories)
(Total: 330 calories)

Morning snack
• Two pieces of fruit such as a small apple, pear, mandarin or one banana (100 calories)

Light Lunch

• Whole grain bread salad sandwich with chicken or fish (350 calories)
• Fat-free yogurt and one piece of fruit (105 calories)
(Total: 555 calories)

Dinner

• 150 gm grilled cod or small chicken breast (140 calories)
• 100 g potato (85 calories)
• Generous helping Broccoli, cabbage and carrots (120 calories)
• Tomato and basil sauce (100 calories)
(Total: 445 calories)

Evening snack

Fresh fruit salad and low-fat yogurt (watch the sugar in the yogurt) (250 calories)

Total for the day: 1,580 calories or 28 fat grams.

What you should notice here is just how much food you can eat and still lose weight. You would not be hungry with a daily menu similar to this. But, if you had eaten only three chocolate bars, you would not just have been very hungry at the end of the day but you would also have filled your system with many times the amount of sugar you need, and your fat intake would have been far too high.

We need a balanced diet whatever weight we are, but it is particularly important if you are trying to lose weight.

Every individual requires a different balance in their diet, depending on age, sex and activity level. If you are pregnant, elderly or recovering from illness then you will require a different balance to the types of food you are eating on a daily basis. I discuss supplements in a later post, since it is very difficult to achieve optimum nutrition even on 2,000 calories per day. This is why eating lots of fresh (or frozen) vegetables and fresh fruit is so important.

Carbohydrates play a crucial role in our energy levels and it is important to include a healthy amount in your program. Usually it is what we serve with our carbohydrates that cause us problems. A healthy slice of whole-grain bread at about 75 calories suddenly becomes the snack from hell when you add butter, a slice of cheese and two slices of ham.

As a guideline, if I were on a regime of 1,500-1,600 calories a day, I would expect to eat the following amounts in the various food groups.

Carbohydrates:– 4 to 6 servings depending on your activity level. ( 1 slice of breads, small bowl of cereal and starchy vegetables such as carrots large tablespoon, potatoes 1 medium, turnip 1 large tablespoon, swede large tablespoon and beans tablespoon).
Green and salad Vegetables:- 4 servings – 1 quarter of a plateful per serving.
Fruit:- 2 – 3 servings – An orange, apple, pear, banana, handful of berries (variety)
Protein:- 2 servings, (1 egg, lean meats, 150 gm chicken or fish)
Fats:- In meats, chicken, oily fish, olive oil and small amounts of cheese in the week.
Milk:– You can use semi-skimmed milk or skimmed milk, but tea does not taste the same to me so I use full-fat milk and just have a small amount on cereal.

The important thing to remember here is that you may need to increase your intake of carbohydrate to fuel certain levels of activity. I have worked with a number of athletes among my clients and their programs were planned around their training sessions. They would eat more carbohydrates, in the form of pasta or beans, on the day before training. This increases their energy and stamina levels even just hours later.

Now time to work off some of those calories and get your blood flowing with some music therapy.

One of the perks of being a radio presenter was being asked to MC charity events and my job was to warm everyone up before the walk or race with some motivational music… over the course of these posts I will be sharing my playlist for those events and to help build your resilience and improve physical, mental and emotional well-being.

Give yourself a break after reading this post and get up and get moving. Ideally every two hours of inactivity should be followed by at least 15 minutes of activity.

If you are not particularly active at the moment then you can walk on the spot, but swing your arms in time to the music so that you activate your breathing. If you are a little bit more adventurous then take to the floor and have fun.  Another artist that I have always enjoyed working out with is Bruce Springsteen and here is Dancing in the Dark uploaded Bruce Springsteen

Buy the music by Bruce Springsteen Amazon US – And:Amazon UK

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you will join me Tuesday for some more Resilience training. Sally

Here are the links to the pages that support the posts in the series

©Sally Cronin Just Food for Health 1998 – 2020

I am a qualified nutritional therapist with twenty-two years experience working with clients in Ireland and the UK as well as being a health consultant on radio in Spain. Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 20 years ago, based on my own weight loss of 154lbs. My first clinic was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Since then I have written a men’s health manual, and anti-aging programme, articles for magazines and posts here on Smorgasbord.

If you would like to browse my health books and fiction you can find them here: My books and reviews 2020

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – March 29th – April 4th 2020 – Musique Mechanaique, Finger Limes, Letters from America and all that Jazz


Welcome to the weekly round up with posts that you might have missed during the week here on Smorgasbord.

I doubt that there are many of you who are not in some form of self-isolation at the moment and I hope that you have everything you need to keep your spirits up. It is saving our lives and I must admit that even going out once a week for my fresh vegetables and fruit does have me spooked as I try to avoid the invisible serial killer roaming the aisles. Thankfully, the majority of people here are very good about self-distancing and being respectful. Some are wearing masks or scarves as I do, and latex gloves.

The supermarkets are taped for distancing and the checkout staff are behind perspex. Everyone is doing their bit and again, they and the healthcare sector are heroes for turning up each day.

I thought you might like to share a special moment. For the last couple of years, my lucky black ceramic cat has sat next to the front door looking out on the world. One morning just after I placed it there, a black cat came to visit. He still does from time to time, but as you can see he is observing social distancing. I have no idea why he keeps coming back as he gets no response from our cat, but I guess he might be determined to do so one day.

Stay safe and as I have previously offered, if you are struggling and would like to chat online then please email me at sally.cronin@moyhill.com.

And in the spirit of getting together and having a little fun, despite the circumstances, there is a party going on over Easter weekend 11th and 12th April. There are still some spots available and I hope you will participate…

This Easter most of us will be in isolation from family and friends and I know how tough that can be. However, as planned the Easter Parade will go ahead and I hope that you will join me over the two days.

Apart from an opportunity to share your blog and books, it is also a chance to meet others who will be featured or who drop in.

There will be food provided as always and something to drink as well as a bit of music. Since the theme is ‘Flashback’ – the music will be from the 1960s – 1980s.  All I need from you is a photograph taken any time in that time period along with a favourite song of the era.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Easter Parade Blog Party April 11th/12th 2020 – #Flashback Photos, food and music

William Price King -Carla Bley – American jazz composer, pianist, organist and bandleader

Carol Taylor – A – Z of Food – ‘F’ for Figs, Finger limes, Flambe, Fenugreek, Fruit Pectin,Fugu

The two final stories of this collection.

Yves – Be careful what you wish for

Zoe – Looking into the future

FamilySaga – Under a Dark Cloud by Mary Crowley

I wrote this piece about the dreaded driving test that we had to take to enable us to buy a car and get insured. We both had full licences from the UK but had to give this up and obtain a Texas licence…

Letters from America 1985-1987 – Adventures in the USA – The Driving Test Texas Style

Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge – #ButterflyCinquain -The Air

Smorgasbord Health Column – Food Therapy – The Banana – Pre-Wrapped nutrient boost on the go

Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore Special -Pre-order for May 5th – Anthology – The Road to Liberation – Trials and Triumphs of World War II

Shortstory Jonah: The hardest demons to face are internal by Jan Sikes

Mystery James J. Cudney, Family Mary Crowley, Cyberpunk C.S. Boyack

Poetry M.J. Mallon, #Mystery Sharon Marchisello, #Paranormal Marcia Meara

#Dystopian Teri Polen, #Poetry Frank Prem, #Horror Vashti Quiroz Vega

medieval stabbur in norway

#Travel – Numedal Valley in #Norway – Amanda McLaughlin of Forestwood Folk Art

Image result for bizet's carmen

SoCS 2019.09.20 – Two Unwrapped Gifts by Miriam Hurdle

Melancholy – Confusion by Apple Gidley

Life 16 Things We Can Do in Our 50’s that We Couldn’t in Our 20’s by Cheryl Oreglia

Bookreview by Kevin Cooper – Fallout by Harmony Kent

More funnies from D. G. Kaye and some new material from Sally

More funnies from D. G. Kaye and some new material from Sally

More seclusion humour from the senior team

 

Thank you for taking the time to visit today and during the week. It means a great deal…stay safe and I hope you will join me again next week for more fun and games…Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Weekly Round Up – 22nd – 28th March 2020


How are you all doing? A tough week for every country as the virus takes its toll and family and friends around the world are being directly impacted.

We are officially on lock down here in Ireland from today until April 12th initially. No non-essential journeys unless to work, supermarket and medical appointments. All non-essential businesses such as hotels, cafes and restaurants, hair salons etc have been shut down for a couple of weeks now and I think that the current lock down has been timed over the Easter weekend to counteract any thoughts of heading off to the coast or other holiday destinations in the country. I went out early to stock up on fresh fruit and vegetables and everyone was being very respectful of safe distances and I was in and out in 20 minutes, including waiting for the shop to open.

The shelves were all stocked including toilet paper, and it was good to see the check out staff behind perspex, so important to keep them safe. As much as I admire the health care staff, who are amazing, it is the men and women who are turning up to work in our essential services every day and putting themselves at risk that also should be shown absolute courtesy and gratitude.

Here we have around 4,500 living in the area during the off season, but from Easter through to September this usually swells by many thousands more staying in mobile homes along the coast. Unfortunately many of the small businesses rely on this summer trade and will no longer be viable after this virus has passed. When you look at issues such as this on this level it is easy to see how our world on a global scale is going to be changed, possibly for many years.

I do think that on the upside, the majority of people are going to be a lot more self-aware with regard to health, personal space and the way they travel going forward. Perhaps for some it will mean a completely different perspective on priorities and what they can live without.

Anyway I do hope you are staying safe and staying indoors and have access to all the food you need and support. And with that in mind, I have created a new theme for Posts from Your Archives, focused on the family and friends who play such an important role in our lives. I hope you will read the post below and participate.

There is no doubt that during this current health crisis that is on a global scale, with many of us in long term lock down, it is our family and friends that we will be turning to for support. Even if, as in my case, my family are hundreds of miles away in the UK and we are only in touch by email and Skype. The online connection we have with family and friends around the world is very important, and I would personally be lost without it. Social media is also key at this time for helping to maintain connection during the isolation, particularly for those living on their own.

In this new series, I would love you to share your posts from the archives about your family and friends, and that can of course include the very important fur and feather family that provide so much comfort.

It might be historical posts about your family who I am sure in the past have had to show their own fortitude during hard times and conflict. It could be a tribute to parents or grandparents or children or grandchildren. How a pet has brought you joy and connection. Stories of your life over the years and your friendships that have supported and motivated you. In prose or poetry.

Find out more: New Series – Posts from Your Archives April 2020 – #Family and #Friends

Now on with the other posts from the week, and as always, my thanks to all the guests who have contributed and regular contributors who add so much to the blog.

Another two stories from the collection.

Walter – Lost and Alone

Xenia – Beloved

Letters from America A Texas Menace and Realtors.

Doglovers – My Name is Danny – #Doglovers – Tales from Danny the Dog assisted by Andrew Joyce.

Double Etheree – The Night Sky

Double Etheree – The Night Sky

Smorgasbord Health Column – Food Therapy – The pungent defenders Onions and Garlic

Shall We Dance from The King and I

Romance – Sunset Beach (Blue Haven Book 2) by Jacquie Biggar

Sir Chocolate and the icecream rainbow fairies square cover

Sir Chocolate and the Ice cream Rainbow Fairies story and cookbook by Robbie and Michael Cheadle

#Thriller Booms and Busts by Geoff Le Pard

Fantasy The Man Who Found Birds among the Stars, Part Seven: Fifth Island in the River: A Biographical Fiction by Lorinda J. Taylor

Mystery Eloise de Sousa, Afghanistan Patricia Furstenberg, Thriller Daniel Kemp

Memoir D.G. Kaye, Paranormal Roberta Eaton Cheadle, Romance Jeanine Lunsford

Mystery Stevie Turner, Fantasy Fiona Tarr, Memoir Pete Springer

short story Footprints by Jemima Pett

1.IMG_9631

50 Tree Stories by Miriam Hurdle

Oven Sheet Pan Crepes with Strawberry Rhubarb Compote

Recipe – Oven Sheet Pan Crepes by The Frugal Hausfrau

#Marriage – After You Say “I Do” by Cheryl Oreglia

Book Review by Kevin Cooper – Fawn by Nash Summers

More funnies from D. G. Kaye and some new material from Sally

More funnies from D. G. Kaye and some new material from Sally

Smorgasbord Laughter Lines Extra…Keep Dancing

Thank you very much for dropping in during the week and leaving your comments, they are much enjoyed. I hope you will join me and my guests again next week and that you stay safe and well… hugs Sally

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Music Column with William Price King – Sidney Bechet (1897 – 1959) – American jazz saxophonist, clarinetist, and composer


This week William Price King Introduces us to American jazz saxophonist, clarinetist, and composer Sidney Bechet.

The Fabulous Sidney Bechet

About Sidney Bechet

Who was the New Orleans jazz pioneer who did most to make this music a unique art form? When this question is asked, the name of Louis Armstrong invariably comes to mind, and rightly so. But there is another jazz musician whose name deserves to be coupled with Armstrong as the greatest of the New Orleans Jazz players. His name is Sidney Bechet.

Sidney BechetBechet was born in New Orleans in May 1897, just three years before his compatriot, Louis Armstrong. Although the two boys grew up in the same city, their home environments were worlds apart. Armstrong grew up in dire poverty, living alternately with his mother and a succession of “stepfathers” and his grandmother, and spending time in a reform school.

Sidney Bechet, who was of Creole ancestry, grew up in a middle class environment. His father, Omar, who was a shoemaker, played the flute as a hobby. Indeed, music had an important role in the Bechet household, as Sidney’s four brothers also played instruments.

His brother, Leonard, played the clarinet and trombone, and it was to the former instrument that eight-year-old Sidney was attracted. Leonard, whose main interest was the trombone, passed along his clarinet to his younger brother.

At first, Sidney played in the family musicales – waltzes, quadrilles, the polite music of the middle class. But as he grew into adolescence, Sidney was attracted to the syncopated music played in the dance halls and brothels in the Storyville District of New Orleans.

As a boy, he would watch the street parades in which jazz bands played. Young Sidney was so attracted to the music, that he often played hooky from school. And as he became more proficient on the clarinet, Sidney played in local jazz bands, such as the Young Olympians. His playing so impressed Bunk Johnson, the legendary cornet player, that Sidney was invited to join Johnson’s band, the Eagle Band. Sidney gained much experience, playing in dance halls, and for picnics, and parties.

Bechet left New Orleans for the first time when he was 19, traveling to Chicago with pianist, Clarence Williams and his variety show. Bechet’s big break came in 1919 when the composer-conductor Will Marion Cook asked him to join his Southern Syncopated Orchestra for an engagement in London.

Here Bechet came to the attention of the noted Swiss Conductor, Ernst Ansermet, who conducted the music of Stravinsky for the Ballets Russa. Ansermet wrote in a Swiss musical Journal, “The extraordinary clarinet virtuoso Bechet is an artist of genius!”

Follow the rest of this iconic musician’s career on The Sidney Bechet Society : Sidney Bechet.org

Here is a selection of Sidney Bechet’s music…

The romantic and endearing “Petite Fleur” was composed by Sidney Bechet in 1952 as an instrumental and lyrics were added in 1959 by Fernand Bonifay and Mario Bua. Bechet merges the beautiful virbrato and fluid melodic motion of his soprano saxophone with that of his clarinet in this piece which quickly became a jazz standard. Shortly afterwards Paddy Roberts, a British songwriter, added a new set of lyrics “Petite Fleur (Little Flower)” prompting a recording by Teddy Johnson and Pearl Carr. Monty Sunshine with Chris Barber’s Jazz Band recorded the song as a clarinet solo and it became an international hit peaking at #5 on the US Hot 100 and #4 on the UK charts. The British super star Petula Clark recorded “Petite Fleur” in French for her hit album “Hello Paris” in 1962. “Petite Fleur” remains a treasure in La Chanson Française.

“Perdido Street Blues “, composed by Juan Tirol, was originally recorded by the Duke Ellington Orchestra, of which he was a member, in 1941. In 1944 Ervin Drake and Hans Lengsfelder added lyrics. This New Orleans style jazz blues gets off with an amazing clarinet solo, exuberant and bursting with life and Louis Armstrong joins his friend Sidney Bechet to make this blues a work of art. Perdido in Spanish signifies ‘lost’ or ‘indecent’ and refers to Perdido Street in New Orleans.

“Moulin à Café ” is from the album of the same name and was released in 1950 on the Vogue label. This album is emblematic of all that is associated with Bechet, who is accompanied by the Claude Luter Orchestra. Claude Luter was a French clarinet player who worked with Bechet many times during his séjours in France. The recordings are a mixture of studio sessions and live concerts and highlights the mastery of his clarinet, reminiscent of the sorrowful vocals of Bessie Smith or Big Mama Thornton. What makes Bechet’s work so poignant is his ability to vocalise his instrument with great emotion. Moulin à Café is the result of of a seven year relationship with Claude Luter, out of which he created and recorded many of the hits that cemented his career.

“La Nuit est Sorcière (Night Is A Witch)” is a ballet composed by Sidney Bechet in 1953 based on the choregraphy of Pierre Lacotte. Bechet wrote this ballet fusing the New Orleans style of jazz with symphonic variations of classical music. The ballet takes place in an attic with the sleepwalker and his servant. The servant hypnotizes his master and takes him on an extraordinary adventure. One night his fiancée, guided by his brother and his sister, tries to awake him up, but fails. However, the young man eventually puts up a fight with his servant and comes back to his senses, finding happiness again. This recording was done under the baton of Jacques Bazire with l’Orchestre Symphonique de Paris. The Ballet was directed by Marcel Martin and features Pierre Lacotte, Josette Clavier, and Gene Robinson. The recording was released on Vogue.

©William Price King 2020

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Buy William’s music ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Connect with William

FacebookWilliam Price King
Twitter @wpkofficial
Regular Venue Cave Wilson

You can find all of the Music Column series in this directory: William Price King Music Column

My thanks to William for sharing this incredible music with us and thank you for dropping in today.  As always your feedback is very welcome.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Music Column with William Price King – Jazz Pianist and Composer Thelonious Sphere Monk


This week William Price King shares the music of jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Sphere Monk.

Thelonious Monk was an American jazz pianist and composer. He had a unique improvisational style and made numerous contributions to the standard jazz repertoire. Monk is the second-most-recorded jazz composer after Duke Ellington, which is particularly remarkable as Ellington composed more than a thousand pieces, whereas Monk wrote about 70.

Monk was renowned for a distinct look which included suits, hats, and sunglasses. He was also noted for an idiosyncratic habit during performances: while other musicians continued playing, Monk would stop, stand up, and dance for a few moments before returning to the piano.

Now time to listen to some of the innovative music of Thelonious Monk.

“Brilliant Corners”, recorded in three sessions in1956 with two different quintets, was Monk’s third album for Riverside Records. The title track, with its unconventional song structure that deviated from the standard song and blues form as well as from Monk’s African-American music roots, was quite complex and required over a dozen takes in the studio to get it right, with changing tempos and accents that only Monk could think of. Monk was the master of the single note, perfectly selected, timed, and struck so that it would have a symphonic amplitude. For Down Beat Magazine, “Brilliant Corners” was the most critically acclaimed album of 1975. In 1999 this album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame, it was also included in the reference book ‘1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die,’ and in 2003 was added to the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress because of its historical significance.

“Thelonious Monk Plays Duke Ellington” is Monk’s tribute to the Duke released on Riverside Records in 1955. Monk and the Duke were totally different in terms of personality and style. The Duke was known for his delicate and elegant melodies and Monk for his harmonic dissonance and percussive style playing with complicated twists and turns. On this album Monk took creative liberties, turning familiar melodies and harmonies into subtle but complicated inversions, playing in the spirit of the Duke while at the same time demonstrating mastery over both tradition and innovation. Monk recorded this album with bassist Oscar Pettiford and drummer Kenny Clarke. This is an outstanding album highlighting the beginnings and golden years of Monk’s career.

“Round Midnight” was penned as an instrumental by Thelonious Monk when he was 18 years old and it was first recorded by Cootie Williams and His Orchestra in 1944 at the suggestion of jazz pianist Bud Powell. Following its success, Dizzzy Gillespie asked lyricist Bernie Hanighen to put words to the melody. This beautiful and haunting ballad was then recorded by Ella Fitzgerald, Mel Tormé, Sarah Vaughan and many more making this the most recorded jazz standard composed by a jazz musician. In 1986, the song was used as the title for the film “Round Midnight “starring saxophonist Dexter Gordon with jazzmen Wayne Shorter, Tony Williams, and Ron Carter. The film won both the British and Academy Awards for Best Score by Herbie Hancock. In 1993 a version of this piece recorded by Monk’s quintet was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

“Criss-Cross”, released on Columbia Records in 1963, is one of Monk’s best albums and features his unique style of stride* piano, harmonic sophistication, rhythmic displacement, and orchestral swing. This album demonstrates how jazz of the 60s was played and at what point many trends were changed. It’s important to note that the musicians who recorded this album had been playing together with Monk for four years at the time of the recording, consequently these tracks are like polished works of art. The title song « Criss-Cross, » is one of Monk’s most critically acclaimed compositions and the success of this song and album led to Monk’s appearance on the cover of Time Magazine in February 1964.

* Stride piano is a style that was developed on the East Coast of the US during the 1920s and 1930s, mainly in New York. This consists of the left hand playing a four-beat pulse with a single bass note, octave, major seventh or major tenth interval on the first and third beats, and a chord on the second and fourth beats.

Additional Sources: Wikipedia

Buy the Music: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Buy William’s music ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Connect with William

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/wpkofficial
Regular Venuehttp://cave-wilson.com/ 

You can find all of the Music Column series in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-music-column/

My thanks to William for sharing the music of Thelonious Monk with us this week and as always your feedback is very welcome.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Music Column with William Price King with John McLaughlin, English guitarist, bandleader, and composer.


This week William Price King shares selected music from John McLaughlin, guitarist, bandleader and composer.

John McLaughlin is an English guitarist, bandleader, and composer. His music includes many genres of jazz combined with elements of rock, Indian classical music, Western classical music, flamenco, and blues. He is a pioneer of jazz fusion.

After contributing to several key British groups of the early 1960s, McLaughlin made Extrapolation, his first album as a bandleader, in 1969. He then moved to the U.S., where he played with Tony Williams’s group Lifetime and then with Miles Davis on his electric jazz-fusion albums In a Silent Way, Bitches Brew, Jack Johnson, and On the Corner. His 1970s electric band, the Mahavishnu Orchestra, performed a technically virtuosic and complex style of music that fused electric jazz and rock with Indian influences. Read more at : Wikipedia

Now time for some tracks from some of John McLoughlin’s albums.

“My Goal’s Beyond”, released on Douglas Records in 1971, is greatly influenced by Indian music and dedicated to Sri Chinmoy, McLaughlin’s spiritual guru. The first half of the album spotlights McLaughlin’s energetic acoustic guitar. There are three jazz standards and five original songs including the classic ‘Follow Your Heart.’ The second part of the album explores the intricate fusion of Indian rhythms, notably ‘Peace One’ and ‘Peace Two.’ The album features heavyweights Dave Liebman on flute and soprano saxophone; Billy Cobham on drums; and Jerry Goodman on violin. On Billboard’s Top 200 “My Goal’s Beyond” peaked at #194 and at #34 on their Jazz Albums Chart. Here is ‘Peace One‘ from the second part of the album.

To listen to the full album: Youtube

“The Inner Mounting Flame” was recorded by the jazz-rock fusion band Mahavishnu Orchestra and released on Columbia Records in 1971. All of the original material was written by McLaughlin. Though this album was influenced by jazz improvisation, it is the rock element that predominates, reminiscent of the electronic innovations of Jimi Hendrix.
McLaughlin’s post-Hendrix edgy guitar riffs on the double-necked electric guitar and Jerry Goodman’s virtuosity on the violin are outstanding, not to mention Billy Cobham’s hard-charging drums, whose jazz-trained technique became the standard for all rock drummers. This album was designed for young rock fans and was very popular in its day. On Billboard’s Jazz Album chart it reached #11 and on their Pop Albums Chart it peaked at #89. The Mahavishnu Orchestra consisted of John McLaughlin on guitar, Rick Laird on bass, Billy Cobham on drums, and Jan Hammer on keyboards and organ. Here is Meeting of the Spirits from the album.

To listen to the full album: Youtube

“Shakti”, released on Sony International in 1976, was recorded live at South Hampton College in New York State. This record presented a hybrid of jazz and far Eastern modes that helped set in motion the commercialization of ‘World Music’ by opening up the ears of many jazz-rock fans to sounds they had never heard before. « Shakti » created an amazing fusion with virtuosic guitar runs; unison playing among all the musicians; mesmerizing percussion duels between Hussain and Raghavan; and Shankar’s Far Eastern violin which matched McLaughlin’s guitar in call and response. All of this made « Shakti » one of the most exciting live albums around. “Shakti” peaked at #37 on Billboard’s Jazz Albums chart in 1976, and at #194 on Billboard’s Top 200.

“Friday Night in San Francisco” was recorded live by John McLaughlin, Al Di Meola, and Paco de Lucía at the Warfield Theatre on December 5, 1980, a musical event compared to that of Benny Goodman at Carnegie Hall in 1938 by critics. This album brings together three of the greatest guitarists at that time in a very relaxed and spontaneous performance, and has been considered one the most influential of all live acoustic guitar albums. This album is divided into three duo and two trio performances, filled with the fire and virtuoso that one expects from guitarists of this caliber at the peaks of their careers. The quality of the compositions and the sensitivity and dynamic variation coming from their performances stand out on this album and exemplifies the and artistry of these three great musicians. “Friday Night in San Francisco” peaked at #6 on Billboard’s Top Jazz Albums chart and #97 on Billboard’s Top 200 in 1981. Here is Mediterranean Sundance from the album.

You can listen to the full album here: Youtube

Buy the albums by John McLaughlin: Amazon US

And: Amazon UK

To find out more and check for tour dates: John McLaughlin Official Site

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Buy William’s music ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Connect with William

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/wpkofficial
Regular Venue http://cave-wilson.com/ 

You can find all of the Music Column series in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-music-column/

Thanks for dropping in today and as always William looks forward to your feedback. Thanks Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Weekly Round Up – 9th to 15th February 2020 – Food, Music, Guest, New book releases, Book Reviews and Laughter.


Welcome to the round up with some posts you might have missed here on Smorgasbord during the week.

I hope that those of you who celebrated Valentine’s Day had a wonderful time… we always enjoy even after 40 years, but this year we managed to both buy the same card for each other which we had a good laugh about… luckily there were a few others that were anonymous to make up for it!!

It was my 67th birthday on Thursday and rather than go out for a meal we decided to indulge in pizzas and ice cream. We don’t give birthday gifts anymore since I have more clothes, handbags and shoes than a department store, don’t have occasion to wear bling very much, and don’t need something else to dust. The most precious gift to me is that we are still going strong and able to eat pizza and laugh.  But I did have a few friends over for tea… virtually.

A wild and windy couple of weeks with the odd day of sunshine as one storm front drives through after another. We are not as badly off as many, especially those who live on the wild Atlantic coastline in the west of Ireland. Nor do we get the snowfalls that those in Britain can expect. And there are a number of storms brewing of a different kind around the world from more floods in Australia to the increasing momentum of the coronavirus.

Whilst naturally are very concerned about catching the virus there is already a fallout that is impacting millions. The travel industry is going to be badly affected as will the tourist industries of many countries around the world as airlines stop services in and out of China and people decide not to fly unless absolutely necessary.

I was looking at the images of the normally very busy Chinatown in the heart of London where we have spent many a lovely evening sampling crispy duck and dim sum. Completely deserted with businesses seriously threatened and the jobs of thousands at risk. Unfortunately it is not just businesses that are threatened but also individuals who are being targeted for the ethnicity.

We have little option but to wait it out and hope that the measures being put in place will turn the tide. Personally I will not be flying in the next few months, especially into major airports. I normally avoid crowded events and places anyway with shopping done early in the morning.

For the elderly, the young and those with a compromised immune system the dangers are very real and it is important to make sure that they are isolated as much as possible from infection. Tough to do but frequent hand washing does help and when my mother was alive she was disappointed that hugging and kissing were banned!

Even though I am a strong advocate for natural therapies, there is no magic potion that can protect you completely. I do use tea tree lotion with a touch of silver on my hands and I am making sure I am getting plenty of vitamin C and D in my diet. Getting out in the fresh air on a daily basis is also a good idea as our centrally heated homes are very attractive to both bacteria and virus opportunists.

I hope by the time I share next week’s round up there will be better news…

Now time for the posts from the week and as always my thanks to contributors and guests for their amazing posts.

The Letter C – Calabash, Cajun, Curry, Cloud Eggs, Chilli and Calamari

Editor Sarah Calfee with a step by step guide to creating the perfect romance plot

Guest Writer Editor Sarah Calfee – The Romance Plot Sequence

The Wind Beneath My Wings from Beaches

Another two stories from the collection

Jane – The Surprise

Kenneth – A Love of Life

This week on  Colleen Chesebro Tanka Tuesday Poetry No 164 the prompts were very appropriate,’Love and Harmony’….. I have selected the synonyms ‘Passion and Rapport’

Etheree – Two Hearts

Shopping List by Nutrient – Part Six – Essential Fatty Acids

Trouble at Clenchers Mill by Diana J. Febry

Trillium by Margaret Lindsay Holton

Scifi Richard Dee, Romance Ritu Bhathal, Thriller Stevie Turner

Short Stories Karen Ingalls, Thriller Terry Tyler, Fantasy C.S. Boyack, Memoir D.G. Kaye

Afghanistan Patricia Furstenberg, Fantasy Kevin Cooper, Midlife Romance Sally Cronin

seaturtle4

Reality informs Fiction – Trails in the Sand by P.C. Zick

FDR Barbara Ann Mojica meets Author Bret Baier

Haiku Dogs Released by Denis Young

19

Mystery Wish You Were Here by Janet Gogerty

Poetry – Who’s Worse by Stevie Turner

Interview Jill Weatherholt and John Howell, Delta Pearl Teagan Genviene, Roti Kool Kosher Kitchen

Valentine’s Day Amanda Cade, Valentine’s Dinner Carol Taylor, Mistaken Identity Anne R. Allen

Reading Robbie Cheadle, Books Teri Polen, Children’s books Jennie Fitzkee

Afghanistan Mary Smith, New Book Teagan Geneviene, Author Promotion Susan M. Toy

D. G. Kaye and her Guest Ann Patras

D.G. Kaye and her guest Ann Patras

Thank you for dropping in during the week and your support is very much appreciated.. thanks Sally.

Smorgasbord Music Column with William Price King – Charles Mingus 1922 – 1979 #Jazz


This week William Price King shares a selection of music from Charles Mingus and here is an extract from his official website where you can find out more about this versatile musician.

One of the most important figures in twentieth century American music, Charles Mingus was a virtuoso bass player, accomplished pianist, bandleader and composer. Born on a military base in Nogales, Arizona in 1922 and raised in Watts, California, his earliest musical influences came from the church– choir and group singing– and from “hearing Duke Ellington over the radio when [he] was eight years old.” He studied double bass and composition in a formal way (five years with H. Rheinshagen, principal bassist of the New York Philharmonic, and compositional techniques with the legendary Lloyd Reese) while absorbing vernacular music from the great jazz masters, first-hand. His early professional experience, in the 40’s, found him touring with bands like Louis Armstrong, Kid Ory and Lionel Hampton.

Eventually he settled in New York where he played and recorded with the leading musicians of the 1950’s– Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Bud Powell, Art Tatum and Duke Ellington himself. One of the few bassists to do so, Mingus quickly developed as a leader of musicians. He was also an accomplished pianist who could have made a career playing that instrument. By the mid-50’s he had formed his own publishing and recording companies to protect and document his growing repertoire of original music. He also founded the “Jazz Workshop,” a group which enabled young composers to have their new works performed in concert and on recordings.

Mingus soon found himself at the forefront of the avant-garde. His recordings bear witness to the extraordinarily creative body of work that followed. They include: Pithecanthropus Erectus, The Clown, Tijuana Moods, Mingus Dynasty, Mingus Ah Um, The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady, Cumbia and Jazz Fusion, Let My Children Hear Music. He recorded over a hundred albums and wrote over three hundred scores.

Although he wrote his first concert piece, “Half-Mast Inhibition,” when he was seventeen years old, it was not recorded until twenty years later by a 22-piece orchestra with Gunther Schuller conducting. It was the presentation of “Revelations” which combined jazz and classical idioms, at the 1955 Brandeis Festival of the Creative Arts, that established him as one of the foremost jazz composers of his day.

You can read more about Charles Mingus and find out more about the Mingus Bands preserving his legacy for a new legion of fans: Official site Charles Mingus

“Pithecanthropus Erectus” is a four-movement tone poem* written by Charles Mingus portraying the first upright human being who, being proud of standing up, saw himself as the ruler of the world, going from pride and accomplishment to hubris and slavery, all of which finally led to his extinction. This composition is haunting, with a repeated theme, sound effects, and interludes that grow darker as man’s spirit sinks lower.

This avant- garde piece (unlike any other in jazz at the time) was a turning point for Mingus’ career. It presaged free jazz and even liberated jazz quite a bit. The symmetrical chord progressions that once dominated jazz were replaced by what Mingus referred to as the ‘extended form’- a long sequence of pedal points, scales and be-bop harmonies which he taught by ear, tailoring the arrangements to the personalities of his musicians. “ Pitchecanthropus Erectus” is a composition full of sumptuous tone colors, and rich in sonic details.

• Tone poem – A piece of orchestral music, usually in a single continuous movement, which illustrates or evokes the content of a poem, short story, novel, painting, landscape, or other source.

“Fables of Faubus” is from the album “Mingus Ah Um”, the first album Mingus recorded on the Columbia Records label and was released in 1959 featuring a painting by S. Neil Fujita, an American graphic designer known for his innovative book cover and record album designs. Mingus is joined on the album by heavyweights John Handy, Shafi Hadi, and Booker Ervin on saxophone; Jimmy Knepper and Willie Dennis on trombone; Horace Parlan on piano; and Dannie Richmond on drums. “Mingus Ah Um” is a tribute to Mingus’ musical forbears, most noteworthy are ‘Goodbye Pork Pie Hat’ which references saxophonist Lester Young who died shortly before the recording; ‘Open Letter to Duke’ a homage to Duke Ellington which draws on three of Mingus’s earlier pieces (‘Nouroog’, ‘Duke’s Choice’, and ‘Slippers’); pianist Jelly Roll Morton;’ and Sonny Rollins.

Another important piece on the album is the controversial ‘Fables of Faubus,’ a mockery of segregationist Orval Faubus (the Governor of Arkansas infamous for his 1957 stand against integration of Little Rock, Arkansas schools) portrayed musically as a bumbling vaudeville clown. “Mingus Ah Um” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2013.

“Passion of a Man” is the from the 1962 album “Oh Yeah”, on the Atlantic label. Mingus was replaced on bass by Doug Watkins as he accompanies the band on piano while at the same time adding bluesy vocals. Mingus chants, scats, shouts, and wails, pushing the band toward an ecstatic fervor while taking them into the depth of the blues. Mingus doesn’t really sing but makes exuberant bluesy punctuations that serve as a non-stop commentary on the music as well as delivering lyrical content. This is just another element for Mingus to play with, and against the rest of the band. There is an infectious enthusiasm that weaves itself throughout where the blues meets jazz, resulting in a steamy concoction that Charles Mingus created with expertise. The Penguin Guide to Jazz awarded “Passion of a Man” a ‘Crown’ token, the publication’s highest accolade, as well as a four-star rating. Q Magazine said the album was ‘a mixture of haunting bluesiness, dancing vivacity, and moments of Andalusian heat…’ and also awarded it four stars. “Passion of a Man” was included in Robert Dimery’s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

“The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady” is a six-part suite, partially written as a ballet by Charles Mingus and recorded with an 11 piece band in 1963. Mingus referred to its orchestral style (which he perfected using studio overdubbing techniques, a first for a jazz album) as ‘ethnic folk-dance music.’ He also gave each song a subtitle. This suite is a masterpiece of rich, multi-layered texture and swirling tonal colors and spotlights many virtuoso performances.

The Penguin Guide to Jazz awarded “The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady” a ‘Crown’ token, the publication’s highest accolade, as well as a four-star rating. Steve Huey of ‘AllMusic’ gave it five stars out of five and said the album was ‘one of the greatest achievements in orchestration by any composer in jazz history.’ Q Magazine said the album was ‘a mixture of haunting bluesiness, dancing vivacity, and moments of Andalusian heat…’ and also awarded it four stars. And finally, “The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady” was included in Robert Dimery’s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.  You can listen to the complete album: The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady

Buy the music of Charles MingusAmazon US – and:  Amazon UK

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Buy William’s music ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Connect with William

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/wpkofficial
Regular Venuehttp://cave-wilson.com/ 

You can find all of the Music Column series in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-music-column/

My thanks to William for selecting this great example of the music of Charles Mingus and as always your feedback is much appreciated.. thanks Sally

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – January 12th- 18th 2020


Welcome to this week’s posts on Smorgasbord that you might have missed.

I hope you have had a good week… I am in housekeeping mode both on and offline. At the moment the Cafe and Bookstore is in the middle of a facelift with the addition of both UK and US Amazon selling pages, Goodreads where the author has a page, and their website or blog. It is a work in progress so don’t worry if your entry does not reflect this change yet, it will soon.

You can help me out if you are an author on the shelves by letting me know in advance that you have a new book being released. That helps me keep your entry up to date but also ensures that you receive a new book promotion when your book is available or is on pre-order offer.

I do go through every week to check for recent reviews but with 150 authors it is easy to miss one. To keep the cafe at a manageable size, authors listed have reviews within the last six months.

A few statistics about the Cafe and Bookstore.

  • In 2019 there were 130 Cafe Updates including the summer features and Christmas book fair and 125 New book Promotions
  • The top viewed (220) New Book on the Shelves was A Bit About Britain’s History by Mike Biles
  • The average new book on the shelves promotion has over 100 views on the blog, multi-retweets on Twitter and shares on Facebook.
  • It is a free book promotion and all it costs is a little bit of your time, letting me know and responding to comments. Judging from comments, I am confident that the posts do result, in not only effective exposure for your books but also sales and more reviews.

If you are not already an author in the Cafe and Bookstore you can find all the details at this link: Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore FREE Author promotion

As to my offline decluttering… with the likelihood of a move and alleged downsizing this year, I am working through my depleted but still over subscribed clothes stash. Despite my continued weight loss, I doubt that the silver lame 1970s disco trousers that I have clung on to will see the light of day (or glitter ball) again… despite the pain it will cost me it is time to send to the charity shop and hope that some other young person might enjoy taking them for a twirl… along with the last of my stilettos….(I need a hoist to keep me upright).  Still I have my glory days to remember… and I still take to the kitchen floor when the mood takes me….

Anyway.. keep dancing

And as always my thanks to the wonderful team who keep coming up with amazing posts and to you for dropping in to read them.

A wonderful introduction to the new column from D.G. Kaye, Debby Gies who explores the Realms of Relationships. She will be on her winter retreat for February but will be back in March. In this column Debby explores our communication skills both verbal and behavioural and strategies for resolving conflict.

D. G. Kaye – Exploring the Realms of Relationships

Welcome to a new series from Carol Taylor, the wonderful A – Z of Food and I am looking forward to expanding my knowledge of wonderful ingredients across the food groups, spices and herbs.

Caroly Taylor’s A – Z of Food – Almonds, Arrowroot, Aubergines and Avocado

This week on the Carrot Ranch Flash Fiction Challenge by Charli Mills   the prompt was a husband carrying his wife…

Carrot Ranch – A Dream Home by Sally Cronin

Two more stories from this collection…

Francis – Forging New Bonds by Sally Cronin

George – Playing Away from Home

This week the prompt for Colleen’s Tuesday Poetry Challenge 160 the prompt is ‘Calm and Present’… I have chosen the synonyms ‘Serene and Deliver’ for my Etheree.

Etheree – On the Wind by Sally Cronin

Movie Hits – Mrs Robinson – The Graduate by Simon & Garfunkel

My review for The Hat by C.S. Boyack

My thanks to Mark Bierman for nominating me for the Sunshine Blogger Award

To start the new series, author Jacqui Murray who shares the wonderfully descriptive simile…very useful for all writers.

51 Great Similes to Spark Imagination from Jacqui Murray

#Canada, #Pottery and #Eagles by Darlene Foster

#Memoir Byte – Reminiscences of the 70s and 80s Fun and Fearless by D.G. Kaye

Scifi – The Magisters Book One by Jack Eason

Acts of Convenience by Alex Craigie

Vandana Bhasin, Smitha Vishwanath, Mae Clair, Miriam Hurdle

#Poetry Bette A. Stevens, #Fantasy Fiona Tarr, #Fantasy D.Wallace Peach

#SunshineBlogger Mark Bierman, #ReadingAloud Jennie Fitzkee, #IndieShowcase Richard Dee

#Karma D.G. Kaye, #Interview Patricia Furstenberg, #Afghanistan Mary Smith

#Guest Marcia Meara with Joan Hall, #Bookclub Amy Reade, #Q&A D.G. Kaye, #Review by Michelle Clements James

#Children’sfears Becky Ross Michael, #Nonverbal Communication Jim Borden, #Familyhistory Liz Gauffreau

#Publishing 2020 Nicholas Rossis, #Freebook Olga Nunez Miret, #Flash Charli Mills Carrot Ranch

In part two I share the best sources for vitamins C to K2 to ensure your shopping list reflects what your body needs to be healthy.

Shopping List by Nutrient part two Vitamin C to K2

More funnies from Debby and a joke from Sally’s Archives

Even more funnies from Debby Gies and Sally

Thank you for dropping in today and during the week. Your support is very much appreciated. I hope you have enjoyed the posts you might have missed and look forward to your feedback. See you next week.. thanks Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up 8th -14th December – Make a Wish, Choirs, Cranberries, A-Z Christmas and Cheesy funnies!


Before we get into the posts you might have missed this week on the blog, a reminder about the Christmas Party on the 21st of December…

The theme for this year’s party is Just One Wish. We are all familiar with the story of Cinderella and her Fairy Godmother, who was pretty liberal with that magic wand of hers and managed to turn a pumpkin into a golden carriage.

Unfortunately, she has long since retired and hung up her wand, but because I asked nicely (and she would like me to promote her memoir – The Prince Charmings I have Known!) she has agreed to allow you all one wish.

  • Your wish can be for anything you like, for you, for someone close to you, real, imaginary, massive such as world peace (that might be a bit of a stretch for her) or something you wish you had done or said in the past.
  • Humour is very welcome as it is tough for anyone to deny you anything if you make them laugh, and this particular Fairy Godmother has a very active funny bone.
  • Her memory is not as sharp as it used to be, and her attention tends to wander, so I suggest you keep your wish to 100 words or less. I cannot guarantee that your wish will be fulfilled, however, putting it out there could produce magical results.
  • My part of this is to fit in as many of your requests in as possible and so I suggest you get your wish in as quickly as you can.
  • I will also do the usual addition of links to your Amazon Page if you are an author, blog as well as one of your main social media.
  • There will be younger family members at the party, so please bear that in mind when submitting your wish, and the Fairy Godmother is not very worldly!

If you are a regular visitor to the blog I will have all your details and just need your ‘one wish’ in an email to sally.cronin@moyhill.com

If a new visitor then please include your blog or website, Amazon link if you have one and your main social media link to sally.cronin@moyhilll.com.

Now time for this week’s posts and as always my thanks to the regular contributors who share such wonderful articles.  And to you for keep showing up with your amazing support.

I am so pleased that William Price King will be a sharing a selection of Christmas music to get us into the festive spirit up to Christmas Day.. enjoy.

Here is another of our posts where I share the nutritional benefits of an ingredient and Carol Taylor incorporates it in a delicious recipe. Next week Carol will be back to share some of her creations from her Thai kitchen offering you some alternative delicacies to eat over the festive season. This week… ..Cranberries – a bitter berry which has a long history in medicinal terms and is still used today in certain over the counter preparations.

Christmas Cook From Scratch – Cranberries Bittersweet

The A-Z of Christmas in Britain – Part Three – Holly and Ivy to Sprouts by Mike Biles

Mince Pies, Christmas, Britain

Mike Biles A – Z of Christmas – Holly & Ivy to Sprouts

Delighted to share a story by Victoria Zigler from the book Ulrike’s Christmas and you can find details of how to buy this book and Victoria’s many other children’s books after her story.

The Tinsel Story by Victoria Zigler

As a special treat, Linda Bethea is sharing another wonderfully entertaining story from her archives, and today we experience a Christmas from the depression that was still filled with homemade gifts, love, laughter and some retribution for past misdemeanours.

Kathleen’s Cuthand Christmas (from Kathleen’s memoirs of the depression) by Linda Bethea

Most of you will know Carol Taylor from her Food and Cookery Column here on Smorgasbord as well as her own eclectic blog located in Thailand, where she shares the wonderful food on her doorstep and recipes that turn them into delicious meals. Carol has shared a very poignant short story.

The Snow Storm by Carol Taylor

This week the prompt words are ‘Give and Shake’ for Colleen’s Tuesday Poetry Challenge 157 And I have chosen the synonyms ‘Grant and Tremble’ in a Butterfly Cinquain.

I Grant you Permission by Sally Cronin

I grant
you permission
to abandon restraint
and tremble with ecstatic bursts
of joy.
It is the time of chocolate
and freedom to consume
as many bars
you wish.

©Sally Cronin 2019

This week on the Carrot Ranch Flash Fiction Challenge by Charli Mills we were tasked on writing a story about a garden gnome or gnomes…mine is loosely based on an alleged true event…

Carrot Ranch – Missing by Sally Cronin

I was given a gift of this lovely anthology and over the last few days I have enjoyed the stories, imagining myself on a front porch swing enjoying balmy breezes somewhere in the southern states of America.. having lived in Texas and visited Tennessee and Mississippi frequently, it did not take much imagination.

My review for Southern Season Stories from a Front Porch Swing

New books on the Shelves for Christmas

#Children 3 – 6 Oskar’s Quest by Annika Perry

Author updates with recent reviews

#Romance Karen Demers Dowdall, #Thriller Toni Pike, #Design Valentina Cirasola, #Memoir J.E. Pinto

#Romance P.C. Zick, #Fantasy Jim Webster, #Thriller Stevie Turner, #Poetry Balroop Singh

YA A.J. Alexander, Romance Christine Campbell, Family Claire Fullerton, PostApocalyptic Sandra J. Jackson

Fantasy Deborah Jay, Memoir Abbie Taylor Johnson, History adventure Andrew Joyce, thriller Daniel Kemp

#Poetry Lynda McKinney Lambert, #Memoir Marian Beaman, #Thriller JP McLean, #Romance Shehanne Moore

Wendy Janes shares the differences in proofreading fiction and non-fiction and it is very interesting.

Musings on Proofreading Fiction and Non-Fiction

Robbie Cheadle who is an experienced book reviewer shares her easy to follow methodology on writing a review.

Robbie Cheadle on how to write a book review

Review D.G. Kaye, Contest Kaye Lynne Booth, Christmas Cake Robbie Cheadle

Story Contest Stevie Turner, Flash Fiction Charli Mills, Book Review Angie Quantrell

#Q&A D.G. Kaye with Lisa Thomson, #Jacksparrow Dolly Aizenman, #Redwine Christy Birmingham

It is that time of year when we tend to throw caution out of the window along with any slimming books and fitness apps we might have (well some of us anyway).

Unfortunately, our pets are also treated to our sense of liberation and they end up eating many things they are not used to. Also their eating patterns might be thrown out the window, and in my experience their inner body clock is more accurate than a Rolex. This does not make for happy pets. Some treats are toxic to pets and can lead to not just stomach upsets but death.

Safe Christmas Treats and Homecooked dinners for Dogs and Cats.

More funnies from D.G. Kaye and a festive recipe from. Sally!

More funnies from D.G. Kaye and a joke for Sally.

Thank you so much for dropping in today and every time you pop by. Your support is very much appreciated and I always love to hear from you… even if it is to say Hi… thanks Sally