Smorgasbord Writer in Residence – The Gospel Truth by Paul Andruss


Welcome to the latest in the exclusive posts written by Paul Andruss for the blog. We are accustomed to Paul’s skill in deconstructing the myths and legends of real and other worldly beings and today he covers one of the most controversial legends of them all!

Portrait of Christ from the Book of Kells
(Paleographically dated to 600-800 AD)

Now this is trickier than getting your keys out of a bag of rattlesnakes.

And before you get on the blower to the Pope in Rome demanding the first fatwa in Catholic history, this ain’t about who He was or even if He was. I’m only examining the evidence. Even if I wanted, I couldn’t change your mind; not by one scintilla, jot or iota. What you believe is down to you.

The New Testament consists of:

4 Gospels – considered, by the faithful, eye witness accounts of Jesus’ life. And Acts of the Apostles, a companion volume to Luke’s Gospel, recording the history of the early church after the crucifixion of 30 AD. It is believed they were written 65-120 AD. But not by the people whose names they bear. Because it has a different viewpoint, John was thought written much later, until a fragment of it, uncovered in Egypt, forced scholars to rethink John’s date to around 100 AD.

Because many Church Fathers disputed St John wrote Revelation, it was almost not included in the New Testament. It is dated to 60-100 AD.

There are letters (epistles) by St Paul, some more genuine than others; by Jesus’s brothers, ‘according to the flesh’, James and Jude; St Peter and St John. Church historians believe Paul’s letters, written between 50 and 60 AD, are the earliest church documents.

So far so good…

Except, we don’t have any original documents, only copies of copies of copies removed by hundreds of years, and with centuries of errors.

Passages from the New Testament were quoted around 100-150 AD, but those documents are now lost. All we have are quotes from writers living a couple of hundred years after the original authors. This is a problem. Without source documents we don’t know if the quotes were ‘corrected’. For some quotes sound similar but are not as they appear in the Gospels. And there are different versions of Gospels around today.

We don’t know how old the oldest extant documents are. None are radiocarbon dated. Radiocarbon-dating of small samples could give dates within 50 years. Yet dates are still assigned through the traditional method of palaeography: the study of ancient handwriting. This technique, around since Erasmus in the 1510s examined Vaticanus, dates the time of writing by how the handwriting looks.

When the Dead Sea Scrolls were radiocarbon dated they were found to be older than estimates based on palaeography. This did not suit Church historians who argued for a date later than Christianity because the Dead Sea Scrolls uncomfortably contained unique Christian ideas.

Dating documents through palaeography seems odd, especially in light of the Turin Shroud. For centuries people argued it was Christ’s burial cloth until it was radiocarbon dated to the Middle-Ages. Even then many ‘experts’ swore the radiocarbon dates were wrong.

Churches have always sponsored biblical scholarship. So while scholars disagreed with each other, they were not prepared to jeopardise their careers by trashing hundreds of years of established ‘evidence’. In a way it is a bit like arguing how many angels can dance on the head of a pin without ever asking if angels exist.

In the 20th century, secular historians argued Jesus never lived at all; pointing out:

  • Many pagan gods had virgin births.
  • The Greek word translated as ‘virgin’ only means ‘young woman’.
  • The word for Joseph’s profession ‘carpenter’ means ‘scholar’.
  • Herod was dead when Jesus was born.
  • There is no evidence the slaughter of the innocents ever happened.
  • Nazareth is not in an ancient list of towns.
  • Nazoreans were Jewish mystics who took vows of celibacy and denial.
  • The Sermon on the Mount (blessed are the meek etc.) belongs to Jesus ben Sira who lived 50 years before Christ.
  • The crucifixion narrative can be constructed from Old Testament quotes concerning the messiah.
  • St Paul and the early Church Fathers talk about Christ the Son of God but never Jesus the man.
  • The gospels have a shaky grasp of verifiable historical events and do not know the geography of Israel.

The English word Gospel comes from the Greek ‘Evangelion’ meaning ‘Good News’. It first appeared on a peace proclamation when Augustus became Emperor at the end of the Roman Civil Wars 30 years before the birth of Jesus.

Early Church Fathers do not mention Gospels. Some speak of ‘Memoirs of the Apostles’ but do not give names or details. St Clement’s letter, thought to be written 40 years after Clement died, says Peter’s disciple Mark wrote down the saint’s favourite quotes from Jesus; after Peter’s martyrdom around 50 AD. The word Clement uses means pithy sayings. He makes no reference to a Gospel.

It is believed the synoptic (one-vision) Gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke) were written 65-120 AD. While largely similar they do not exactly correspond with each other. John differs widely from the others, even down to the day of the crucifixion and who witnessed it. Because of this, John was considered the last one written; until that pesky fragment turned up. Now it’s the earliest document we have. Arguments still rage over the fragment’s palaeographic date.

Mark, deemed the first (and shortest) gospel, influenced Matthew and Luke. Early fragments are paleographically dated to 250 AD. Earliest fragments of Matthew are paleographically dated to 175-250. Fragments of Luke and Acts are paleographically dated 150 -200.

In 1958 a document was found dating to 1646. It quotes a passage from an early Church Father about a Secret Gospel of Mark, presenting Christianity as a mystery cult focusing on resurrection and initiation. Mark in both Sinaiticus and Vaticanus ends abruptly without mentioning the resurrection. In Vaticanus the rest of the page is left blank. In modern versions we have a various longer endings for Mark.

Many believe the original Matthew was the lost Ebonite or Hebrew Gospel. Quotes from the Church Father Papias show his version of Matthew is not the one we have today.

There is evidence the Gospel used by the heretic Marcion influenced Luke. Acts divides into the early history of the church in Jerusalem, Paul’s conversion and mission to the Gentiles; then abruptly shifts to a first person plural (we) narrative for long passages. This suggests different documents were collated.

15 other books detailing the acts of individual apostles never made it into the New Testament.

The earliest copies of the New Testament are the Codices Sinaiticus and Vaticanus. (A codex is a book, not the usual Greek and Roman scroll.) Some think they belong to the 50 copies of the Bible the Emperor Constantine ordered, around 350 AD, for his new churches in his new city of Constantinople, when he legalised Christianity. If so they were written some 320 years after the crucifixion.

No one knows anything about the Codex Vaticanus until it turns up in the Vatican Library in 1475. It is a myth the Vatican Library hides all sorts of ancient documents. Rome was looted and burned so many times it is doubtful anything survived. It was due to a lack of books Pope Nicholas V spent a fortune founding the Vatican Library in 1448.

Sinaiticus was found in St Catherine’s monastery in the Sinai desert in the 1850s.

Although large parts are missing, it is the most complete early text in existence. It contains books excluded from the New Testament by the council of Bishops in 350. These include some of the oldest Christian writings such as the Letter of Clement, the Didache and the Shepherd of Hermes: early books of church lore.

When it was found churchmen denounced Sinaiticus because it varied so much from Vaticanus. There are 3036 differences between the two gospel texts, not counting scribal errors. Experts say it is easier to find 2 consecutive verses that differ than agree. Perhaps this means there was not one version of the Gospels even then.

Christianity was fragmented right from the start. Something the church was reluctant to admit. 200 years after Christianity became the official religion of Rome, Christians were still killing each other over whether Jesus was God or similar to God!

A century after the crucifixion an early Church Father insisted there were only 4 gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, because there were 4 winds and 4 pillars of the earth. Yet he knew more gospels existed: Gospels of the Hebrews, Ebonites and Nazarenes – Jewish Christian sects believing Jesus was the Jewish Messiah; the anti-Jewish Gospel of Marcion; the Gospel of Peter that said Christ felt no pain when crucified and did not die, but was ‘taken-up’. Shocking as it sounds this may be the earliest account of the crucifixion.

These biographical gospels vanished when Christianity became the religion of the Roman Empire; probably because they did not toe the official line. Today they are mainly known from later writers quoting early Church Fathers condemning them as heresy and giving scraps as examples. Recent finds of papyrus fragments in the Middle East show there were other gospels telling Jesus’ story. They are similar to known gospels, but not from them.

There were Gospels of Thomas, Wisdom of Christ, Mary Magdalen and Philip, which only listed Jesus’ sayings. These were lost until a cache was discovered buried in the Egyptian sands at Nag Hamadi. The Gospel of Philip is famous because Dan Brown seized on a line in the Da Vinci Code: Jesus often kissed Mary on the… and here there is a hole in the parchment.

The Letters, or Epistles, of the New Testament throw little light on Christian history. James ignores the fact it is written by Jesus’ brother and gives a sermon on why Christians should be Jews. Jude claims he is James’ brother but not Jesus’ and is another sermon.

Peter comforts a persecuted group. Two of John letters are sermons and the third a short note warning against a heretic. All are believed written after the authors died.

Paul letters are mainly exhortations not to slip into heresy. 7 of them are considered genuine because they confirm incidents in his life quoted in the Acts of the Apostles and bear his name, 2 are undecided and 4 false. There is no supporting evidence for the 7 genuine letters other than writers quoting earlier authors.

Many books about the early Christian period (including Roman historians like Tacitus) went missing after Christianity became the official religion. Some went missing in the last few centuries. This led some historians to claim the Church was rewriting its past. After all, history is written by the winners.

Until something changes, like better dates, more discoveries or even a new way of thinking about early Christianity, we might never know the Gospel Truth.

©PaulAndruss 2017

 

About Paul Andruss

Paul Andruss is a writer whose primary focus is to take a subject, research every element thoroughly and then bring the pieces back together in a unique and thought provoking way. His desire to understand the origins of man, history, religion, politics and the minds of legends who rocked the world is inspiring. He does not hesitate to question, refute or make you rethink your own belief system and his work is always interesting and entertaining. Whilst is reluctant to talk about his own achievements he offers a warm and generous support and friendship to those he comes into contact with.

Paul Andruss is the author of 2 contrasting fantasy novels

Thomas the Rhymer – a magical fantasy for ages 11 to adult about a boy attempting to save fairy Thomas the Rhymer, while trying to rescue his brother from a selfish fairy queen.

Thomas the Rhymer

Finn Mac Cool – rude, crude and funny, explicitly sexual and disturbingly violent, Finn Mac Cool is strictly for adults only.

Finn Mac Cool

Connect to Paul on social media.

Blog: http://www.paul-andruss.com/
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.andruss.9
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Paul_JHBooks
Google+  https://plus.google.com/s/+jackhughesbooks

You can find all of Paul’s posts in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/writer-in-residence-writer-paul-andruss/

Thank you for dropping by today and please feel free to share the post on your own blog and networks. Thanks Sally

 

 

Writer in Residence Extra – ‘Well, I’ll be a Monkey’s Uncle!’ by Paul Andruss


Another dip into the archives on Paul’s blog for this final post in the Evolution series that we have been featuring. You only have to watch nature programmes featuring Chimpanzees for us to recognise certain characteristics and mannerisms that we associate with our upstanding human species.

However, we have not treated our distant relative with respect or kindness and for many it has been with downright cruelty. I was privileged to film a documentary at Monkey World in Dorset some years ago and seeing those who had been rescued from a life in a laboratory was life-changing.

As always Paul approaches the subject with thought provoking honesty.

Oliver- the Humanzee?

‘Well, I’ll be a Monkey’s Uncle!’ by Paul Andruss

There are repeated reports of a human – chimpanzee hybrid, called a humanzee.
The first is from the year 1,000 AD when the Benedictine monk, Peter Damien, claimed he saw the monstrous offspring of a woman and an ape. More recently, a circus chimpanzee called Oliver (1958-2012) was touted as such.

Oliver was bald with a flat almost human face and freckles. Rather than knuckle walk, like chimps, he preferred to walk upright. It was also claimed Oliver preferred women to female chimpanzees. In 1996 a geneticist examined Oliver’s chromosomes and found he had the normal amount for a chimpanzee, which is 24 pairs. Humans have only 23.

Chimpanzees and humans last shared a common ancestor between 9 – 5 million years ago. In the human branch, 2 chromosomal pairs fused reducing the number from 24 to 23. Scientists believe this resulted in neoteny. It means characteristics in young animals survive into adulthood. In the case of our early ancestors this produced a flatter face and longer legs, perhaps encouraging walking upright.

One argument against chimps and human interbreeding was the different number of chromosomes prevented fertilisation.

However, mules are  horses (31 chromosomal pairs) crossbred with donkeys (64 pairs). Zebras, with 16 to 23 pairs – depending on species – can breed with horses (31 pairs) as can the original wild Przewalski’s Horse, with 33 pairs. So, it is certainly possible for humans and chimpanzees to interbreed.

In addition, about 98% of genes are common to both our species. In rare cases, humans are born with regressive traits such as tails and grasping hand-like feet.

In 1977 a researcher discovered human sperm could penetrate the simian egg’s protective membrane – designed to keep out foreign bodies.

In 1920, a Russian scientist fell out of favour with the Soviet government before he successfully fertilised female chimpanzees with human sperm. In 1967 a similar experiment was abandoned in China after successful fertilisation. In 1980 it was rumoured the experiments would resume.

Now we know it is possible, all that remains is to ask… Why?

Why would we want to do it?

Humanzees, as genetic products, would have no human or animal rights. Forget advanced robotics with billion dollar budgets and artificial intelligence. If hybrids were created, they would be the true robots – from the Slavic word Robotnik meaning slave.

In slave-owning societies throughout history, slaves were worked to death, or abandoned when no longer useful, physically and sexually abused, and even murdered with impunity by their owners.

Oliver, the human-like chimp was owned all his life. Owned & sold on. From 1989 to 1998, he was kept in a tiny cage by a laboratory leasing animals for scientific testing. He ended up crippled with arthritis from his confinement and almost blind. There was evidence of neglect and physical abuse. He died at half his expected lifespan.

Don’t you feel proud to be human?

©Paul Andruss 2017

About Paul Andruss

Paul Andruss is a writer whose primary focus is to take a subject, research every element thoroughly and then bring the pieces back together in a unique and thought provoking way. His desire to understand the origins of man, history, religion, politics and the minds of legends who rocked the world is inspiring. He does not hesitate to question, refute or make you rethink your own belief system and his work is always interesting and entertaining. Whilst is reluctant to talk about his own achievements he offers a warm and generous support and friendship to those he comes into contact with.

Paul Andruss is the author of 2 contrasting fantasy novels

Thomas the Rhymer – a magical fantasy for ages 11 to adult about a boy attempting to save fairy Thomas the Rhymer, while trying to rescue his brother from a selfish fairy queen.

Thomas the Rhymer

Finn Mac Cool – rude, crude and funny, explicitly sexual and disturbingly violent, Finn Mac Cool is strictly for adults only.

Finn Mac Cool

Connect to Paul on social media.

Blog: http://www.paul-andruss.com/
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.andruss.9
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Paul_JHBooks
Google+  https://plus.google.com/s/+jackhughesbooks

You can find all of Paul’s posts in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/writer-in-residence-writer-paul-andruss/

Thank you for dropping by today and please feel free to share the post on your own blog and networks. Thanks Sally

Writer in Residence – Frankenstein by Paul Andruss


Last week Paul Andruss introduced us to the darker side of the rock star of the day Lord Byron.. https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/writer-in-residence-lord-byron-mad-bad-and-dangerous-to-know-by-paul-andruss/

This week we follow on with a post on the real background to the mad scientist Frankenstein who created a monster that has become part of the fabric of modern horror stories.

Charles Ogle as the Creature in Thomas Edison’s 1910 Frankenstein movie

Johann Conrad Dipple was born at Castle Frankenstein in 1673. After University, he returned to Castle Frankenstein to practice alchemy, anatomy, and possibly much worse. He claimed to have developed a technique to transfer the soul from one corpse to another. He also claimed to have produced an Elixir of Life from the boiled flesh and bones of dead animals, which he modestly called Dipple’s Oil. At one point Dipple offered to buy Castle Frankenstein in exchange for the formula. He was turned down.

In his old age it was said he had sold his soul to the Devil in return for occult knowledge. It is likely Dipple himself perpetuated the rumour to attract students and those willing to pay for his elixir of life. A year before his death, at the age of 61, he published a pamphlet claiming the elixir would keep him alive for 135 years.

It is likely Mary Wollstonecroft called her scientist Victor Frankenstein after hearing about Dipple during a visit to the Castle Frankenstein region in 1814 with her future husband, the poet Shelley. They record meeting students from Dipple’s old university and it is more than likely the notorious old boy’s experimental attempts to create life in cadavers, lost nothing in the telling. Soon afterwards, Mary speaks of “gods making new men” in her journal.

Mary and Percy Shelley at her mother’s graveside

Mary Shelley wrote ‘Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus’ at the age of 18 and published it anonymously when she was 20. She added the subtitle “the Modern Prometheus because in Greek mythology Prometheus created mankind on behalf of Zeus. When he later stole fire from heaven to give to man, Zeus was so furious he consigned Prometheus to hideous eternal punishment. Bound to a rock, an eagle came each day to tear out Prometheus’ liver which grew back during the night as he was immortal.

The story goes that during 1816 Mary and Percy Shelley stayed with fellow poet Lord Byron, and his personal physician John Polidori, in the Villa Diodati by Lake Geneva in Switzerland. 1816 was called ‘the year without a summer’ due to the huge volcanic explosion of Mount Tambora the year before. Sheltering from the cold dreary weather, bored, drunk and probably on opium, they amused themselves by reading ghost and horror stories from the Fantasmagoriana.

Mary, Percy, Bryon and Polidori

Byron proposed they each write a ghost story. Byron managed a few fragments on vampire legends he learned while travelling around Greece. John Polidori later embellished these into a novella which gave rise to the vampire genre; resulting in Stoker’s Dracula via the immensely popular penny-dreadful serial ‘Varney the Vampyre’.

Polidori’s ‘The Vampyre’ was about a suave aristocratic, amoral, Englishman; a thinly disguised portrait of his boss, Byron… famously called mad, bad and dangerous to know.

With the encouragement of Shelly, Mary developed her short story into a novel.
Unlike Karloff’s monosyllabic, broody film version of the monster, in the James Whale 1931 movie, Mary’s creature can barely keep his mouth shut for five minutes. Articulate and eloquent he constantly muses on the world of mankind and his place in it. He seeks only acceptance and love. Unable to find it in humanity he asks Frankenstein to create another like him: a female companion. Frankenstein refuses; terrified of compounding his mistake by creating a race of monsters. The creature takes revenge on his creator murdering everyone he loves.

N.B. The creature is not called Frankenstein in the book. That is his creator’s name.

A blue plaque commemorates Polidori’s residence in Great Poultney Street in Soho in London.

For a modern twist try Peter Ackroyd’s highly recommended disturbing Gothic homage ‘The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein.’

©Paul Andruss 2017

About Paul Andruss

Paul Andruss is a writer whose primary focus is to take a subject, research every element thoroughly and then bring the pieces back together in a unique and thought provoking way. His desire to understand the origins of man, history, religion, politics and the minds of legends who rocked the world is inspiring. He does not hesitate to question, refute or make you rethink your own belief system and his work is always interesting and entertaining. Whilst is reluctant to talk about his own achievements he offers a warm and generous support and friendship to those he comes into contact with.

Paul Andruss is the author of 2 contrasting fantasy novels

Thomas the Rhymer – a magical fantasy for ages 11 to adult about a boy attempting to save fairy Thomas the Rhymer, while trying to rescue his brother from a selfish fairy queen.

Thomas the Rhymer

Finn Mac Cool – rude, crude and funny, explicitly sexual and disturbingly violent, Finn Mac Cool is strictly for adults only.

 

Finn Mac Cool

Connect to Paul on social media.

Blog: http://www.paul-andruss.com/
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.andruss.9
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Paul_JHBooks
Google+  https://plus.google.com/s/+jackhughesbooks

You can find all of Paul’s posts in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/writer-in-residence-writer-paul-andruss/

Thank you for dropping by today and please feel free to share the post on your own blog and networks. Thanks Sally

Smorgasbord Reblog – The Pool of Salmacis by Paul Andruss


Our writer in residence Paul Andruss has an amazing blog of his own where he dives behind and beneath myths and legends as well as some oddities to entertain, inform and fascinate. This week he turns his spotlight on Mount Olympus and some of the shenanigans that the Gods got up to… As mere mortals we can only read and marvel….

Salmacis & Hermaphroditus become one flesh (Andruss)

Hephaestus, the club-footed blacksmith god was thrown down from Olympus after his mother, Hera, rejected him because he was deformed. Needless to say Hephaestus’ skill with forging weapons was so great, the Olympian gods needed him long before he needed them. To soften his heart Zeus, gave Hephaestus Aphrodite as his bride.

The beautiful goddess of love was not pleased and never lost an opportunity for taking her revenge by having affairs; often with other gods. The result of one such tryst with fellow god Hermes was her son Hermaphroditus.

As you would expect of any child whose mother was the goddess of love, Hermaphroditus was a bit of a stunner, but being brought up in secret, away from people and hidden from the gods for fear of reprisal, he was also naive.

Our story begins when Hermaphroditus, hot and tired from the day’s hunting chanced on a pool, deep within a shady glade, and thought to quench his thirst.

©Paul Andruss 2017

Read the rest of this myth and find out what happens to Hermaphroditus: http://www.paul-andruss.com/the-pool-of-salmacis/

Thomas the Rhymer Paul Andruss

You can find articles that Paul has written for Smorgasbord in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/writer-in-residence-writer-paul-andruss/

Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – Short Story Fest, Stevie Wonder, Lord Byron and a cast of thousands


Because I am going to be in London next weekend for the #BloggersBash I will be leaving some entertainment behind in the form of short stories… some of my own but also those contributed by you. Still some slots to fill if you have the time to send one of yours in.

Details in the post.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/01/smorgasbord-short-stories-lit-fest-june-9th-12th-storytellers-wanted-sally-at-the-bloggersbash/

Now onto the week’s post in case you have missed one or two.

My thanks as always to my weekly contributors William Price King and Paul Andruss for their amazing support and creativity.. and of course to all of you who have visited, liked, commented and shared. Very appreciative.

William Price King Meets some Legends – Stevie Wonder

Next week is the finale of the Stevie Wonder series and we will be sharing some of his most popular singles from the last two decades.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/31/william-price-meets-some-legends-stevie-wonder-part-three-the-1980s/

Writer in Residence – Paul Andruss.

Paul takes another of our literary legends and puts a different spin on the story behind this rock star of his era. Meet the real Lord Byron…. Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/writer-in-residence-lord-byron-mad-bad-and-dangerous-to-know-by-paul-andruss/

The Colour of Life by Geoff Cronin

This weekend is the last of the Colour of Life but next week I will begin sharing Geoff’s second book The Black Bitch and other Stories.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/03/the-colour-of-life-salad-and-omelets-in-kritsa-1975-by-geoff-cronin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/04/the-colour-of-life/ – Sangria

Smorgasbord Book and Blog Promotions.

Just a reminder of the ways you can promote your books and blog. Details are in the post.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/smorgasbord-free-author-and-blogger-promotion-2017/

The Book Reading and Interview at the Cafe

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/31/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-book-reading-and-interview-with-dan-alatorre/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/03/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-book-reading-and-interview-with-judith-barrow/

New on the Shelves

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/01/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-on-the-shelves-the-brede-chronicles-book-one-by-p-i-barrington/

The Updates

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-d-g-kaye-and-kim-cox/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-update-karen-ingalls-janice-spina-and-fiona-tarr/

Book Promotion Air Your Reviews

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-allison-d-reid-and-nicholas-c-rossis/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/01/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-deanie-humphrys-dunne-and-sacha-black/

Smorgasbord Blogger Daily

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-29th-may-2017-noelle-granger-jenny-fitzkee-sue-vincent-and-robbie-cheadle/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-30th-may-2017-shehanne-moore-with-p-j-lazos-linda-hill-with-sacha-black-and-don-massenzio-with-darlene-foster/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/31/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-31st-may-2017-lauren-taylor-charla-puccino-patricia-salamone-a-chaos-fairy/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/01/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-june-1st-2017-kevin-morris-vashti-quiroz-vega-with-d-g-kaye-andrew-joyce-and-the-librarian-talks/

Smorgasbord Short stories

I shared one of the stories from my next volume of What’s in a Name being released later in the summer. Sorry about the need for tissues…

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/smorgasbord-short-stories-whats-in-a-name-volume-two-xenia/

And one from my first collection of short stories – Flights of Fancy.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/smorgasbord-short-stories-flights-of-fancy-manana-manana-by-sally-cronin/

Smorgasbord Health 2017

Smorgasbord Health 2017

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/smorgasbord-health-2017-top-to-toe-the-blood-oxygen-distritution-waste-disposal-and-anaemia/

A fascinating article about a new book that debunks much of the current thinking of salt in our diet and its effect on our blood pressure and obesity.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/smorgasbord-health-nutrition-in-the-news-salt-we-may-have-been-getting-it-all-wrong/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/01/blood-health-and-anaemia-foods-and-menu-to-give-you-a-boost/

Humour

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/the-afternoon-video-perhaps-i-might-get-a-goat-after-all/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/smorgasbord-time-for-some-laffs-some-home-truths-courtesy-of-tina-frisco/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/02/smorgasbord-time-for-some-laffs-something-to-start-the-weekend-with-a-smile/

Well that is it for another week.. As I am away until Monday next week you will find the next round up on Tuesday 13th…

Thank you again for all your support and have a good week. Sally

 

 

Writer in Residence – Lord Byron – Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know by Paul Andruss


Welcome to another article by Paul Andruss that explores the truth behind some of our literary legends. Lord Byron was had a short life but one that left its mark on the world…

Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know… by Paul Andruss

Byron in Greek National Dress

No, not me… but I’m flattered you considered it, even for a moment.

‘Mad, bad and dangerous to know’ was how Lady Caroline Lamb described her lover Lord Byron after he dumped her. Caroline Lamb was as mad as a box of frogs. Even Byron couldn’t handle her, which, God knows, given his track-record should be proof enough.

Caro Lamb (Wikipedia)

During one vitriolic public spat with Byron, ‘Caro’ attempted suicide in the middle of a ball by slashing her wrists with a wineglass. Talk about hell has no fury; she then took it on herself to blacken his name with a public eager for any breath of scandal from this rock-star.

Hang on, rock star? Well famously, sex, drugs and rock-n-roll makes you a rock-star. All you gotta do is substitute poetry for rock-n-roll and….

What d’ya think the big appeal was for people like Keats? Consumption?

Considering we have a song for every occasion from weddings to funerals, with lyrics so personal they are meant only for us, is it really so hard to image getting the same chills from a poem?

In the days before I-pods, Discmans, Walkmans, transistor radios, dancettes, radiograms and even wind up gramophones (not though I’m implying any of you are that old) music was not personal, but public. After all, you can’t take a piano on a picnic. But you could a poetry book; to be read aloud or even in dreamy silence.

Ken Russell brought home the idea of poets as rock-stars, as only he could, in his film Gothic: about the summer Byron spent with fellow poet Shelley in the villa Diodati on the shores of Lake Geneva. A holiday that saw the creation of Frankenstein and the first inklings of vampire fiction based on Byron’s remembered folktales from his travels in Greece. In the opening scene two prim young women sneak into the villa gardens, spot the poets, start screaming hysterically and throw their bloomers at them.

Mary and Percy Shelley; Byron and John Polidori (National Portrait Gallery)

Due to the huge volcanic explosion of Mount Tambora the year before, 1816 was called ‘the year without a summer’. Byron and Shelley, along with the Wollenscroft sisters, stayed in the Villa Diodati. Imprisoned in the house by the appalling weather they did what any self-respecting rock-stars would do: got drunk and off their heads on opium, and no doubt hashish from Ottoman Turkey.

George Byron was born in 1788 with a club foot, something that caused him acute embarrassment and violent fights at school. It also added to his allure an adult: sure proof he was the Devil. His deformity possibly gave him the idea of controlling his image when famous. He personally approved all portraits, only allowing himself to be presented in certain studied poses that gave rise to an ideal of a Byronic hero: mean, moody and magnificent.

Byron Portrait (From Britannica)

So, we know Byron was a poet, even though we can’t quote any lines of poetry (*see footnote); that he was devilishly handsome (remember he approved his portraits); and a thoroughly bad lot. But who was Byron and why did the very mention of his name make men, as well as women, want to lie down and reach for the smelling salts?

One of the first things you come across is Byron’s bisexuality. Although, I think that term is a bit post-Freudian. People are sexual, and of course opportunistic. In an all-boys school with hormones raging, then…

Byron confessed to ‘violent passions’ with school friends and had a protégé at university. In later life, he admitted believing ‘consciousness of sexual difference made England untenable’. In those days, homosexuality and sodomy was not just social ruin, but also hanging offences.

Byron also had women: lots of women. One was a distant cousin, Mary Chatsworth; another was his half-sister, Augusta Leigh. Rumours of incest abound. It was claimed he fathered a child on Augusta. His introduction to sex started at the age of 9, when a serving girl visited his bedroom to ‘play tricks on his person’: her way of ensuring he did not tell his mother of her drunken binges.

Underpainting sketch for portrait of Byron’s half-sister Augusta Leigh

During this time his widowed mother’s suitor Lord Grey De Ruthyn also made sexual advances on him. The first vampire story, and possible origination of the genre, was written by Byron’s physician John Polidori during that fateful summer at the Villa Diodati. The vampire, a suave nobleman based on his employer Lord Byron, is called Lord Ruthven, making one wonder what Bryon confided to his handsome, young doctor and under what circumstances.

At the age of 21, Byron headed off on a European Grand Tour as did most young noblemen. An influencing factor may have been a friend downing himself rather than risking public exposure of his sexuality. Byron later admitted sexual freedom was also a lure.

In 1809, with Napoleon rampaging through Europe and Wellington fighting the Peninsula War in Portugal, Byron headed to Italy and through the Ottoman Empire to Turkish Greece. (Greeks and Turks still hate each other.) Here he took up with a 14 year old boy and a 12 year old girl in Athens.

(Even writing this leaves me feeling contaminated – child abuse: one of the many unpalatable facets of history. The past is not just a foreign country; it’s your worst nightmare.)

On a brighter note the Pasha of Greece allegedly wanted to make Byron his catamite. Byron only managed to evade his advances because of his title.

Returning to England, Byron wrote of his travels in the first cantos of his ‘Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage’ and became instantly famous. Of course despite mounting debts, Byron, being a gentleman, refused payment for his work, which must have made his publishers very happy indeed.

Annabella Milbanke

During this time came his scandalous affairs, mounting debts and unhappy marriage. His wife’s wealthy family were ‘trade’. They had the cash: he the title. Annabella Milbanke, a ‘blue-stocking’ (i.e. educated), their heiress was their pride and joy.

She was also Caro Lamb’s cousin, which couldn’t have gone down well with her deranged relative once she realised Byron had no intention of revisiting that pasture. Fervent, pure-minded and madly in love with Byron’s poetry, Annabella believed she could cure her husband’s excesses and thereby save his soul.

Hmmm… guess what!

Eventually Byron was forced to flee rather than face prosecution for sodomy with his wife. Society gasped to learn Annabella was prepared to face such public humiliation merely to punish her husband. They suspected Caro was behind it. A trifle hypocritical considering Byron had also indulged himself in that way with Caro before marriage and Caro rather enjoyed it, even dressing up as a young manservant to facilitate the illusion.

However, exile did allow Byron to escape his ruinous debts – so it wasn’t all bad.

While living in Venice in 1816, he learned Armenian, co-authoring an English-Armenian Grammar, and eloped with the young wife of an old count with whom he resided until he left for Greece 7 years later. During this time he wrote many important works including Don Juan. His friend Shelley died in a boating accident as did his illegitimate daughter to Mary Wollenscroft Shelley’s sister. Dead of fever at the age of 5, while under her father’s loving but negligent care.

Memorial to the drowned poet Shelley in Oxford

In 1823 Byron joined the Greek fight for Independence from the Ottoman Empire. While sailing to the Greek mainland from the island of Kefalonia, Byron’s ship, fleeing the Turkish navy, landed to Messalongi where Byron joined the rebels. The following spring he caught a chill which may have resulted in pneumonia. With unsterilized instruments the usual medical practice of bloodletting left him with blood poisoning. He died on the 23 April 1824 aged 36.

He left instructions in his will for all his personal papers to be destroyed. His executors carried out his last request: making him even more of an enigma and ensuring the myth of the Byronic hero influenced generations of poets, writers and bohemians. Although lauded by the Greeks and an object of endless fascination to the British public, the establishment never really forgave him.

Byron Memorial Messalongi Greece

Byron had a daughter with his wife Annabella: the famous ‘blue stocking’. No surprise Ada turned out to be a brilliant mathematician, developing computer programmes for Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine (1837): the first general purpose programmable digital mechanical computer of the modern age. The size of a small palace it was worked by gears and handles. Due to its size and complexity Babbage only completed a small part of the Analytical Engine, before his death. But all this of course is another story.

Ada Lovelace (nee Byron)

*Footnote: Opening lines of ‘She Walks in Beauty’ by Byron
She walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies,
And all that’s best of dark and bright
Meets in her aspect and her eyes;

©Paul Andruss 2017

About Paul Andruss

Paul Andruss is a writer whose primary focus is to take a subject, research every element thoroughly and then bring the pieces back together in a unique and thought provoking way. His desire to understand the origins of man, history, religion, politics and the minds of legends who rocked the world is inspiring. He does not hesitate to question, refute or make you rethink your own belief system and his work is always interesting and entertaining. Whilst is reluctant to talk about his own achievements he offers a warm and generous support and friendship to those he comes into contact with.

Paul Andruss is the author of 2 contrasting fantasy novels

Thomas the Rhymer – a magical fantasy for ages 11 to adult about a boy attempting to save fairy Thomas the Rhymer, while trying to rescue his brother from a selfish fairy queen

Thomas the RhymerFinn Mac Cool – rude, crude and funny, explicitly sexual and disturbingly violent, Finn Mac Cool is strictly for adults only

Finn Mac Cool

Connect to Paul on social media.

Blog: http://www.paul-andruss.com/
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.andruss.9
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Paul_JHBooks
Google+  https://plus.google.com/s/+jackhughesbooks

You can find all of Paul’s posts in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/writer-in-residence-writer-paul-andruss/

Thank you for dropping by today and please feel free to share the post on your own blog and networks.

Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – Stevie Wonder, The Neanderthals and other legends


Thanks for dropping in and a quick review of the guests and posts this week in case you missed.

The Blogger Daily returns next week and to help me out it would be great if you would email me the link to your most recent post in the last week so that I can share from tomorrow. sally.cronin@moyhill.com

My thanks as always to contributing guests for their hard work. William Price King shares the 1970s and Stevie Wonder’s amazing music with us and Paul Andruss delights with news of our distant relatives – The Neanderthals and a doyen of the kitchen.. Mary the woman behind the Marie-Bain.

A poem that touched everyone’s hearts from Carmen Stefanescu and some cook from scratch Eggs and a bit of a disaster.

If you are in the bookstore and have a new release, review or offer then get in touch so that they can be included in the two Cafe and Bookstore updates on Monday and Friday..

Even if you are not in the bookstore you can join the 200 other authors with your books by emailing me sally.cronin@moyhill.com.

The new Air your Reviews post is doing well and this is open to any author even if you are not in the bookstore to share your latest great review.

I do check as many authors and blogs but I do not use a crystal ball so please help me out and let me know sally.cronin@moyhill.com  Thanks

Hope you enjoy the post and thanks again for all your tremendoous support.. It keeps me motivated.

William Price King meets some Legends.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/24/william-price-king-meets-some-legends-stevie-wonder-part-two-the-1970s/

Writer in Residence Paul Andruss

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/26/writer-in-residence-extra-meet-the-in-laws-our-neanderthal-relatives-by-paul-andruss/

Thomas the Rhymer

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/27/smorgasbord-reblog-mary-the-jew-by-paul-andruss-one-for-the-cooks-amongst-us/

The Colour of Life by Geoff Cronin

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/27/the-colour-of-life-the-tanglers-hat-1965-geoff-cronin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/28/the-colour-of-life-the-turkey-run-1968-by-geoff-cronin/

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore

The Updates

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/22/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-marcia-meara-and-shehanne-moore/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/26/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-bette-a-stevens-and-stevie-turner/

New on the Shelves

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/23/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-on-the-shelves-1066-by-jack-eason/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/26/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-on-the-shelves-rarity-from-the-hollow-by-robert-eggleton/

Book Reading and Interview

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/24/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-book-reading-and-interview-sandra-j-jackson/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/27/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-book-reading-and-interview-c-s-boyack/

Air Your Reviews

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/23/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-amy-m-reade-and-natalie-ducey/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-karen-ingalls-and-paul-cude/

Smorgasbord Health 2017

Cook from Scratch

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/23/smorgasbord-health-cook-from-scratch-magical-cloud-eggs-jena-c-henry/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/smorgasbord-health-cook-from-scratch-is-it-wrong-to-swear-when-baking-for-the-church-pie-sale-by-molly-stevens/

Nutrition in the news

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/22/smorgasbord-health-2017-food-in-the-news-high-fructose-corn-syrup-90-hfcs-now-in-a-product-near-you/

Top to Toe

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/22/smorgasbord-health-2017-top-to-toe-the-skin-eczema-genetics-or-lifestyle/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/smorgasbrod-health-2017-top-to-toe-the-cardiovascular-system-and-the-components-of-blood/

Humour

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/22/the-afternoon-video-a-little-massage-between-friends/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/24/smorgasbord-time-for-some-laffs-whats-in-a-name-cafes-getting-creative-and-an-odd-town-or-two/

Smorgasbord Poetry

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/24/smorgasbord-poetry-self-portrait-by-carmen-stefanescu/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/26/weekly-image-and-haiku-desperate-for-water-by-sally-cronin/

Smorgasbord Short Stories

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/23/flights-of-fancy-anthology-curtains-by-sally-cronin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/smorgasbord-short-stories-flights-of-fancy-anthology-trust-by-sally-cronin/

Tales from the garden volume two

I have just finished writing the stories for the second volume.. You have not read them all and I am giving you the choice to read one of the stories beginning with the following letters. Q  V W X Y Z… put your choice in the comments section and the story will be posted on Tuesday.. The selection ends at midnight tonight.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/smorgasbord-short-stories-whats-in-a-name-volume-two-you-get-to-pick-the-story/

Thank you so much for keeping me company.. Enjoy the rest of the weekend.. Sally

Smorgasbord Reblog – Mary the Jew – by Paul Andruss – One for the cooks amongst us.


Another look behind the legends from Paul Andruss on his blog. This time a woman who those of us who cook have reason to bless… the woman who invented the Bain-Marie and ensures the success of custard and other delicate recipes that require some gentle finesse in the preparation. And you will not believe the story…….

Female Alchemist

Cooks know a Bain-Marie is a ‘double boiler’, a water-bath used for delicate cooking such as making custard. The ingredients are placed in a bowl and gently heated over a pan of boiling water, or individual dishes are stood in a tray of water that is put in the oven.

Bain Marie is French for ‘Mary’s Bath’ and you won’t be surprised to know that it was invented by a woman called Mary, or Mary the Jew to be exact. In bygone days, folks were punctilious in their racism. What may surprise you was Mary was not a celebrity kosher chef but an alchemist.

None of her works survive. She is only known from quotes in a compendium of writings called the Book of Hermetic Lore. These were fragments from different alchemy treatise put together in the 7th or 8th century in Constantinople.

Find out more about this mysterious woman who introduced this very useful piece of kitchen equipment into our lives: http://www.paul-andruss.com/mary-the-jew/

You can find Paul’s amazing posts that have featured here in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/writer-in-residence-writer-paul-andruss/

Writer in Residence Extra – Meet the In-Laws – Our Neanderthal relatives – by Paul Andruss


We dip into the archives on Paul’s blog to discover more about our ancestory. Are Neanderthals extinct or do they live on in some of us?

Paul Andruss has a great new look about page.. head over and share around please… Paul’s blog is a treasure trove of ancient history and modern legends that he deconstructs and delivers brilliantly.. Definitely a blog to follow.. Nominated in this year’s #BloggersBash Awards….Most informative blog and well deserved.

Meet the In-Laws – Our Neanderthal Relatives by Paul Andruss

Neanderthal family: not too different from us

Not only is the human genome project completed – the mapping of all 24,000 human genes, but scientists have also completely mapped the Neanderthal Genome; from DNA recovered from bones dating back some 38,000 years. The results were surprising and have caused a total re-assessment of one of our closest cousins.

Like the rest of our relatives – the great apes and early hominid species – Neanderthals always got a bit of a bum deal. Scientists said they were….

Stupid
On average Neanderthal brains were a fifth bigger than ours

Dumb… literally – they couldn’t speak

Neanderthals had the same speech related Gene FOXP2 with the same mutations as modern humans.

Brutish and violent, scavengers and cannibals 

Neanderthal Mother

They were sophisticated big game hunters, who cooked vegetables and wild grains.  There is evidence of cannibalism, but from necessity – eating the dead when facing starvation in a world much harsher than ours. How is that any different to what we have done in similar circumstances – such as the Andean plane crash or the Donner party when trapped by winter snows in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in 1846.

That is not to say they were better than us. Neanderthals could be just as violent with each other as we are.

No culture and a rudimentary tool kit that never evolved

Recreation of Mammoth bone house

Neanderthals built canoes to sail to Mediterranean islands. They constructed complex shelters using mammoth tusks and bones. There is evidence men stayed in the tribe, while women came from outside – implying marriage rituals. They buried their dead. They created art such as ring structures made from shaped and coloured stalagmites.

Neanderthal Burial

Neanderthals were different from us

Kith n Kin: Neanderthal & Modern Human

Scientists were also wrong about humans and Neanderthal cross-breeding. They dismissed skeletons of children from Mount Carmel in Israel and Lagar Velho in Portugal that had features from both species. But recent gene analysis shows modern humans and Neanderthals shared between 99.5% and 99.9% of their genes. At least 4% of the genes in modern Europeans, and their descendants across the globe, are unique to Neanderthals.

Scientists also maintain Neanderthals went extinct almost 40,000 years ago. Although there is evidence to suggest they existed around 24,000 years ago. Given they were wrong about everything else could they be wrong about this too?

It may be possible small groups of Neanderthals survived in Europe into historical times and are responsible for European legends of trolls and dwarves.

There are legends of the Alma, a humanoid who ranges from the edge of Siberia to as far south as Kazakhstan and the Caucasus Mountains that lie between the Black and Caspian Seas.

A 19th century report of a captured female Alma described her as having a short stocky build and being immensely strong; with red hair, sloping forehead and robust receding chin. Genetic evidence shows Neanderthals to have red or sandy hair. The last reliable sighting of one such creature was made by the Russian scientist Alexander Pronin in 1948.

According to the historian Boris Porshney, the female Alma, named Zanya, mothered four surviving children by different men. He reported all the children were said to look similar to normal humans except they were much stronger.

Porshney investigated Zanya’s living descendants and remarked on their unique features, including a robust receding jaw. Although he failed to find her grave, he dug up the remains of her direct offspring and concluded their skeletal structure was more similar to Neanderthals than modern humans.

The legend of the Alma supports the idea the Neanderthal race is not extinct, but still lives in the isolated and inhospitable parts of Eurasia that formed their traditional home territory.

©Paul Andruss 2017

About Paul Andruss

Paul Andruss is a writer whose primary focus is to take a subject, research every element thoroughly and then bring the pieces back together in a unique and thought provoking way. His desire to understand the origins of man, history, religion, politics and the minds of legends who rocked the world is inspiring. He does not hesitate to question, refute or make you rethink your own belief system and his work is always interesting and entertaining. Whilst is reluctant to talk about his own achievements he offers a warm and generous support and friendship to those he comes into contact with.

Paul Andruss is the author of 2 contrasting fantasy novels

Thomas the Rhymer – a magical fantasy for ages 11 to adult about a boy attempting to save fairy Thomas the Rhymer, while trying to rescue his brother from a selfish fairy queen

Thomas the Rhymer

Finn Mac Cool – rude, crude and funny, explicitly sexual and disturbingly violent, Finn Mac Cool is strictly for adults only

Finn Mac Cool

Connect to Paul on social media.

Blog: http://www.paul-andruss.com/
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/paul.andruss.9
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Paul_JHBooks
Google+  https://plus.google.com/s/+jackhughesbooks

You can find all of Paul’s posts in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/writer-in-residence-writer-paul-andruss/

Thank you for dropping by today and please feel free to share the post on your own blog and networks.

Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – Stevie Wonder, Justice ‘East End’ Style, Skin and Bones


Welcome to the round up for the posts this week just in case you missed any. I feel a little guilty since I spent quite a bit of time off line and not spending time with your blogs but I promise that just another week to go and I will be more attentive.

The plan was to get the next volume of What’s in a Name finished.. I have two more stories to go Y and Z… already in my head and then I have some surprises to add that will be revealed when it is published.  A slightely different appoach to the names from K to Z with just ordinary people doing something they will be remembered for.. Even if it is only by those they love.

Some of you may remember that I wrote a story using an illustration by the very talented Donata Zawadzka.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/smorgasbord-short-story-tales-from-the-irish-garden-after-the-festival-illustrated-by-donata-zawadzka/

This story along with 24 more make up the sequel to Tales from the Garden but this time set in Ireland. Queen Filigree is forced to escape from the palace beneath the magnolia tree in Spain and to seek refuge with her Irish cousin.

I am working with Donata who is producing four central illustrations that head up the four seasons in the book and I am very excited by the project. And I have to thank Paul Andruss for introducing us. It will be in print as well as Ebook and is the first book of mine to be written in Ireland since 1999.

You can find out more about Donata at her website and her sales site:  http://dezawadzka.wix.com/donatasgallery
Buy her work on Redbubble: http://www.redbubble.com/people/donattien/works/7004053-the-birch-maiden?c=32080-ink-illustrations

I have managed to get some gardening done this week which has a duel purpose.. I pot plants and plot stories!  I am going to do the same this week whilst I finish the current projects but I will be in each day to check up on things and have a chat.

Thank you for all your wonderful support and wonderful comments… I am hugely grateful.

Now for a look at the posts from the week… with additional thanks to my two collaborators.. William Price King and Paul Andruss.

William Price meets the Legends

A brand new series and this time the artist is the amazingly talented Mr. Stevie Wonder who has entertained us for over 50 years. His first performances at age 11 propelled him to early stardom and some of his most iconic hits were written when he was a teenager.  To get you in the mood is one of my all time favourites.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/william-price-king-meets-some-legends-stevie-wonder-the-early-years/

Writer in Residence – Paul Andruss

Paul explores the origins of music and you might look at chimpanzees in a different light.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/19/writer-in-residence-extra-song-and-dance-man-by-paul-andruss/

The Colour of Life – by Geoff Cronin

Just a few more chapters to go in my father-in-law’s memoir but since so many of you have enjoyed I will also be serialising his second book of tall tales.. This week too I pay tribute to my mother-in-law Joan who would have been 97 yesterday. A lovely woman with the most infectious laugh you will ever hear.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/20/the-colour-of-life-serialisation-the-rosary-1955-by-geoff-cronin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/20/the-colour-of-life-extra-behind-every-great-man-joan-cronin-1920-1994/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/21/the-colour-of-life-tommy-and-the-fish-and-the-power-of-prayer/

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore Book Reading and Interview

Just  a reminder that if you are in the bookstore you are welcome to do a book reading and interview. The details of how to do that are in this post.  My guest this week was Richard Ankers and next week Sandra J. Jackson and C.S. Boyack.

Sally's Cafe and Bookstore

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/new-series-sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-book-reading-and-interview/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/20/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-book-reading-and-interview-richard-ankers/

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore New on the Shelves

If you are not already on the shelves of the bookstore then please pop in and take a look at this post which has a link to what you need to send me.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-on-the-shelves-13-steps-to-evil-by-sacha-black/

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – Author Update

If you are in the bookstore you can enjoy regular updates of new releases, great reviews or offers.. Just send me an email to sally.cronin@moyhill.com

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/15/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-dan-alatorre-and-angie-dokos/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/19/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-deanie-humphrys-dunne-and-lesley-fletcher/

Smorgasbord Book Promotion – Air your Reviews

This is open to all authors on the bookstore shelves or not… just send the link to your latest great review to sally.cronin@moyhill.com

Jessica Norrie

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-jessica-norrie-and-sue-coletta/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-annette-rochelle-aben-and-hugh-w-roberts/

Smorgasbord Poetry

My thanks to Robbie Cheadle for her contribution to this post this week.. In a dilemma about which cake to bake for her husband’s birthday she took to verse…

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/17/smorgasbord-poetry-which-cake-by-robbie-cheadle/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/19/smorgasbord-poetry-dark-waters-by-sally-cronin/

Smorgasbord Short Stories

The Sewing Circle is about a group of elderly residents of an East London estate whose lives are devastated by the actions of a family of thugs.  Here are all three episodes. More stories from this collection next week.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/11/smorgasbord-short-stories-the-sewing-club-part-one-by-sally-cronin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/15/flights-of-fancy-short-story-anthology-novella-the-sewing-circle-part-two-by-sally-cronin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/flights-of-fancy-short-story-anthology-the-sewing-circle-part-three-by-sally-cronin/

Some personal stuff

I was delighted to be interviewed by two writers this week. The first was with Amy M. Reade.

https://amreade.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/sally-cronin-is-back/

And the second was with Lisa Burton.... courtesy of Craig Boyack.

https://coldhandboyack.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/odd-job-girl-on-lisa-burton-radio/

I was also very honoured to be nominated in the Most Informative Category for the #BloggersBash this year and voting is now open. There are ten categories and some wonderful nominees.. Please head over and vote for your favourites.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/19/smorgasbord-reblog-bloggerbash-2017-voting-is-now-open/

Smorgasbord Health – Let’s Walk a Marathon Challenge

This week.. how to burn extra fat…

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/15/lets-walk-a-marathon-update-and-methods-to-burn-extra-fat/

Smorgasbord Health – Top to Toe.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/smorgasbord-health-2017-top-to-toe-the-skeleton-the-progresson-of-osteoporosis-over-50-2/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/smorgasbord-health-2017-top-to-toe-the-skin-the-largest-organ-of-the-human-body/

Smorgasbord Health – Cook from Scratch

I would love to hear from you if you have a recipe made from fresh ingredients that is a favourite.. sally.cronin@moyhill.com

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/cook-from-scratch-the-sandwich-that-packs-a-punch-with-link-to-140-fillings/

Humour

Put your troubles away for a little while and enjoy the outlook of a pug who has a neural problem but does not let it get him down..

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/15/the-afternoon-video-when-adverts-are-better-than-the-television/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/16/smorgasbord-time-for-some-laffs-joys-of-old-age-and-a-slice-of-scotland/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/19/lets-walk-a-marathon-the-agility-circuit-try-and-keep-up-with-this-jack-russell/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/05/20/smorgasbord-time-for-some-laffs-things-are-not-always-what-they-seem/

Thanks for showing up, commenting, sharing and being so supportive.. hugs Sally

Keep smiling