Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Podcast – Tales from the Garden – The Sanctuary by Sally Cronin


Over the coming weeks I will be sharing the stories from Tales from the Garden which I hope you will enjoy in audio

Thanks for tuning into the new series of stories from Tales from The Garden in audio. A collection I wrote in tribute to our home in the mountains to the north of Madrid where we lived from 1999 to 2016. We inherited a number of statues from the previous owners that were too big to take with them, and I also found some discarded around the garden. Perfect characters for stories, some of whom moved on with us to Ireland and appeared in Tales from the Irish Garden.

About Tales from the Garden

Tales from the Garden reveals the secrets that are hidden beneath hedges and trees. You will discover what really happens at night as you sleep unaware in your bed. Stone statues and those hidden worlds within the earth are about to share their stories. The guardians who have kept the sanctuary safe for over fifty years will allow you to peek behind the scenes of this magical place. They will take you on a journey through time and expand your horizons as they transport you to the land of fairies, butterflies and lost souls who have found a home here.

In this second story a deer about to give birth is in mortal danger out on the wildness of the mountainside… can she find a save haven in time?

 

Images ©Sally Cronin

I hope you have enjoyed the story and will join me again next week for another.

You can find out more about my books and reviews: Sally’s Books and Reviews

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Podcast – Tales from the Garden – The Guardians of the Magic Garden by Sally Cronin


Over the coming weeks I will be sharing the stories from Tales from the Garden which I hope you will enjoy in audio

Thanks for tuning into the new series of stories from Tales from The Garden in audio. A collection I wrote in tribute to our home in the mountains to the north of Madrid where we lived from 1999 to 2016. We inherited a number of statues from the previous owners that were too big to take with them, and I also found some discarded around the garden. Perfect characters for stories, some of whom moved on with us to Ireland and appeared in Tales from the Irish Garden.

About Tales from the Garden

Tales from the Garden reveals the secrets that are hidden beneath hedges and trees. You will discover what really happens at night as you sleep unaware in your bed. Stone statues and those hidden worlds within the earth are about to share their stories. The guardians who have kept the sanctuary safe for over fifty years will allow you to peek behind the scenes of this magical place. They will take you on a journey through time and expand your horizons as they transport you to the land of fairies, butterflies and lost souls who have found a home here.

Fairy Stories for children of all ages from five to ninety-five that will change the way you look at your garden forever.

This first story is about two very large lion statues that had pride of place in front of the house.. definitely in charge of all those who lived there.

 

 

Images ©Sally Cronin

I hope you have enjoyed the first story in the series and will join me again next week for another.

You can find out more about my books and reviews: Sally’s Books and Reviews

Smorgasbord Podcast – Short Stories – Grace by Sally Cronin


Welcome to the podcast and the first of the short stories I have recorded for over Christmas. I hope you will enjoy.

Grace

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you have enjoyed… Sally.

 

Smorgasbord Podcast – Short Stories – Father Christmas by Sally Cronin


Welcome to the podcast and the first of the short stories I have recorded for over Christmas. I hope you will enjoy.

Father Christmas

 

Thanks for dropping in today.. as always your feedback is very welcome.. Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – 7th- 13th November – Remembrance, Anniversary, 1982 Hits, Book reviews, Guest Bloggers, Health and Laughter


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed on Smorgasbord this week.

Hope that you are all staying safe as cases seem to be spiralling upwards in most of our countries. Whispers of a Christmas lockdown here in Ireland seems to be gathering momentum and it might be necessary but certainly sad for those who were looking forward to finally seeing their loved ones around the Christmas dinner table at last.

On the homefront nothing much to report.. but it is our Wedding Anniversary on Monday.. 41 years… and rather than socially distance in a restaurant sipping Champagne through our masks.. we are going to have a rather Smorgasbord inspired meal of our favourite things….

We don’t drink much these days but a bottle of Cava will be chilled and accompanied by Tempura Prawns, Spring Rolls, Crispy Duck and Spare Ribs and followed by mini-eclairs. So if you don’t see much of me around the usual haunts on Monday afternoon, you will know why!

This week as always William Price King selected some great music for the Breakfast Show… we hope you enjoyed the selection.. Debby Gies and Daniel Kemp kept us laughing.. And thank you too for joining us and sharing the posts… it is much appreciated.

Chart Hits 1982 Part One – The Alan Parsons Project, Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder, Survivor, Steve Miller Band

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In Remembrance – The War Poets – In Sawnlees Once and Can You Remember Edmund Blunden

The War Poets Rupert Brooke – The Soldier

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Vera Brittain The Superflouous Woman

Siegfried Loraine Sassoon CBE, MC The Working Party

Shoes, Makeup, Drama, A Wedding Carly Simon and The Sting

XH558 (G-VLCN) Avro Vulcan - Last Flight over Farnborough (cropped).jpg

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1974/1975 – Married Quarters, Barry White, The Towering Inferno

Weekly Grocery Shopping List by Nutrient – Part Six – #Essential Fatty Acids

#Poetry – Grief Songs: Poems of Love and Remembrance by Elizabeth Gauffreau

Brody Cody and the Stepmother from Outer Space by Toni Pike

Past Book Reviews #Thriller – Our Justice (John Cannon Book 3) by John W. Howell

#UniversalLinks – One Link to Rule Them All by Sarah Brentyn

#Art – Painting in Defiance by M.L. Holton

Patty and her guide dog Blue. Patty has her hair tied back in a low ponytail and rests her right hand on Blue's head. She wears a white shirt with a pink and purple butterfly on the front and light blue shorts. Blue is a handsome black lab. He wears a brown leather harness with a handle attached to the back and is smiling at the camera as he sits in front of Patty. In the background is a brick building with white, windowed doors and a flowerpot overflowing with pink and yellow blooms.

Who Is She? Claire Plaisted: an Interview with Anita Kovacevic shared by Patty Fletcher

#WATWB – Meet the Young Woman Helping Others Smile, One Bouquet at a Time! – D.G. Kaye

#Music #Facebookads Nice Work If You Can Get It…by Will McMillan

#PreOrder #Poetry A Beechworth Bakery Bears e-Book: Waiting For Frank Bear by Frank Prem

New Book on the Shelves – #NewAdult #Romance – Our Summer by Angie Dokos

New Book on the Shelves #Christmas – Mountain Laurel Christmas by Jan Sikes

#Romance Lisette Brodey, #History #NorthernIreland Jane Buckley, #psychologicalthriller Lucinda E. Clarke

#CrimeThriller Sue Coletta, #Paranormal John W. Howell, #Shortstories J. E. Spina

– #Fantasy Richard Dee, #History Patricia Furstenberg, #Fantasy Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene

10th November 2021 – #Reviews Jan Sikes, #Writing Marcia Meara, #Poetry D.G. Kaye, #Round Up Carol Taylor

#Remembrance Roberta Eaton Cheadle, #Afghanistan Mary Smith, #Ceramics Rebecca Budd, #Review Olga Nunez Miret

November 16th 2021 – Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Hibernation and Doctors.

 

November 11th 2021 – Another Open Mic Night with author Daniel Kemp – Blonde Men and Holiday Offer

 

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week… thanks Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry Rewind– In Remembrance – The War Poets – Vera Brittain by Sally Cronin


This time of year, I re-post the series The War Poets. Just some of the men and women who served on the front line on all sides of the conflict who fought, died or returned scarred by their experiences.

They are going out at 4.a.m each morning my time, which is the coldest before the dawn, and as they would have woken in the trenches to prepare for another day of horror, bravery and sacrifice.

We often dismiss the words of the young due to their lack of life experience. However there was no such lack in the lives of the youthful poets who experienced the dreadful events of the First and Second World War. Today a woman who lived through both of these conflicts and lost ones that she loved.

You can listen to this post on my podcast along with the poem THE SUPERFLOUOUS WOMAN

 

 

51ctwSjImuL._UY250_Vera Brittain

The next poet in the series on the War Poets is a woman, Vera Brittain, feminist, poet and novelist, who was born in Newcastle under Lyme on 29 December 1893, and was raised in Macclesfield and Buxton. Educated at St. Monica’s School and Somerville College, Oxford. She left to serve as a Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse (VAD) during the First World war, being posted to France and Malta. Vera became engaged during the war, in 1915, to Roland Leighton but sadly he was killed by a sniper in December of that year. Tragically she was also to lose her brother Edward in 1918 and two other very close friends.

Following the end of the war, Vera returned to Oxford to read history, and worked briefly as a teacher before devoting her time to writing. By now a committed pacifist, she was involved with the Peace Pledge Union until her death, and served as vice-president of the national Peace Council, campaigning for peace during the Second World War.

Her first poetry was published in August 1919, Verses of a V.A.D, containing a poem dedicated to Edward, To My Brother. Her first novel, The Dark Tide, was published in 1923.

In 1925 Vera married George C.G. Catlin a political scientist and they moved to New York for a year to live. Her famous memoir Testament of Youth was published in 1933, a story of ‘the lost generation’. The book also recounted her wartime experiences and her marriage to George C.G. Catlin.

Vera Brittain died in Wimbledon on 29 March 1970. Her ashes were sprinkled over her brother Edward’s grave in Italy, where he died. I have chosen her poem The Superflouous Woman because I think it reflects the enormity of the loss of nearly a whole generation of young men who died in the First World War and the millions of young women at the end of the conflict, who lost not only their boyfriends and husbands, but in many cases the chance of every finding love again.

THE SUPERFLOUOUS WOMAN

Ghosts crying down the vistas of the years,
Recalling words
Whose echoes long have died,
And kind moss grown
Over the sharp and blood-bespattered stones
Which cut our feet upon the ancient ways.
But who will look for my coming?

Long busy days where many meet and part;
Crowded aside
Remembered hours of hope;
And city streets
Grown dark and hot with eager multitudes
Hurrying homeward whither respite waits.
But who will seek me at nightfall?

Light fading where the chimneys cut the sky;
Footsteps that pass,
Nor tarry at my door.
And far away,
Behind the row of crosses, shadows black
Stretch out long arms before the smouldering sun.
But who will give me my children?

A small selection of Vera Brittain’s work.

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Buy Vera Brittain’s books: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK

 

Sources and for more information and the work of Vera Brittain: First World War Poets and Prose

 

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you will join me tomorrow for the last in this short series…Sally

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Poetry Rewind – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Rupert Brooke – The Soldier


This time of year, I re-post the series The War Poets. Just some of the men and women who served on the front line on all sides of the conflict who fought, died or returned scarred by their experiences.

They are going out at 4.a.m each morning my time, which is the coldest before the dawn, and as they would have woken in the trenches to prepare for another day of horror, bravery and sacrifice.

We often dismiss the words of the young due to their lack of life experience. However there was no such lack in the lives of the youthful poets who experienced the dreadful events of the First and Second World War. Today a poet whose work I first read as a teenager in an old poetry book I found on the shelves in our home. It had a profound effect on me and the way I viewed conflict.

Here is the podcast for the post.

 

Rupert Brooke

Poetry has played an enormous role in our history particularly when telling the stories of heroes and heroines through the ages. Very popular during Victorian times, verse was used prolifically to proclaim love, poke fun at politicians and big wigs as well as to honour bravery in service to Queen and Country. Poetry was as widely read as novels and in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, a number of our most well-known poets were born producing some of our most loved verses.

I am by no means a poetry expert but I have found that verse is very individual and that you enjoy those pieces which reflect events and emotions in your own life.

For example; as a teenager I found a book of Rupert Brooke’s poems on a bookshelf at home and there were one or two at that age that I understood and enjoyed. However, as I have got older and revisited his work and other poets, I realise that my own life’s experience enables me to appreciate their work in a more profound way. Although Rupert Brooks is best known for his war poems such as The Soldier, there are others that also reflect his experiences of love and life beautifully, despite his own youth.

Like many of the poets of the first part of the 20th century Rupert Brooke was caught between the Victorian strait laced puritanism and the liberal 20’s. He was a bit of a jack the lad, considered an Adonis by both men and women. In his short life he loved both; mainly those within the growing social and intellectual societies such as the Fabians.

Anyway a little biography of this talented young poet.

Rupert Chawner Brooke was born on 3rd August 1887 second son to William Parker Brooke a housemaster at Rugby school and his wife Ruth Cotterill. Rupert attended both the preparatory and main schools before going up to King’s College, Cambridge where he studied the classics, somewhat badly, as he was more interested in literature and acting. At the end of his third year he turned his attention to literature and moved out of Cambridge to Grantchester. Here he and his circle of friends embraced the country life whilst developing interest politics and in the growing socialist reforms as members of the “Fabian Society”.

In 1911 Rupert spent time in Munich learning German before returning to Grantchester to work on his fellowship at King’s. At the same time he completed his first volume of Poems which in the next 20 years was reprinted 37 times at around 100,000 copies.

In 1913 Rupert was finally awarded his Fellowship at King’s but did not take it up immediately choosing to travel to New York, Canada, San Francisco and New Zealand before settling on Tahiti; living with a Tahitian beauty Taatamata.

However, running out of money and suffering from a bad infection from coral poisoning, Rupert returned to England in mid-1914. He took up his fellowship at King’s but his idealism gained new focus with the onset of War. On September 15th he applied and was accepted for a commission in the Royal Naval Division and embarked with his battalion to defend Antwerp from the German Advance.

The War Years

Antwerp fell to the Germans and the battalion returned to England and over the next three months Brooke’s company re-equipped and despite a period of illness Rupert embarked on a ship to the Dardanelles on February 27th 1915. Over the next two months the battalion spent time in Malta, Lemnos and Eygpt as they attempted to reach the front.

Rupert suffered another bout of ill health including sunstroke and dysentery. Senior officers, aware of his growing fame as both a poet and potential influential politician, decided he should be kept away from the front lines, offering him a staff job that he refused.

On Saturday 10th April 1915, Brooke’s troopship left Port Said for Lemnos via the Island of Skyros. They arrived there on Saturday 17th April, The officers and men landed on Skyros and conducted exercises but on 20th April Rupert Brooke fell seriously ill with blood poisoning. His system already weakened by several bouts of infection he could not overcome this latest illness, and on April 23rd he died aboard ship aged 27.

He had commented on the beauty and peace of a particular olive grove on the island and was buried there by his fellow officers amongst the scent of flowering sage.

220px-P8170206Image Sherrill Schell

The poem The Soldier has stood the test of time and is as evocative today as it was nearly 100 years ago. Especially as we prepare to honour the young men and women who have served and died. Not only for our own countries, but all those in any conflict around the world.

1914 V: The Soldier

If I should die, think only this of me:
That there’s some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England’s, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.

And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven.

Buy Rupert Brooke complete works : Amazon UK – And: Amazon US

Find out more about Rupert Brooke: Wikipedia

 

Thank you for dropping in today… Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Round Up – 17th – 23rd October 2021 – Pink Floyd, Movies, Short Stories, Books, Reviews, Anti-Aging, Health and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed this week on Smorgasbord.

Another week flown by and well and truly into autumn.. This week a major job in the garden with the side and back of the house now fully lawned. Not that I can claim any credit except for buying the biscuits to go with cups of tea, but the team who were doing the work barely stopped for a break. Very impressed with the result and they did an amazing job.

That is the last of the major jobs before tackling the internal decoration and waiting for the guy to come and repair the wood stove.. we now have all the spare parts and it will be great to get them off the dining room table…

I have finished my clothes, bags and shoes declutter and next week I shall be starting on the kitchen cupboards…that will be interesting…

The Blog

I am also working on the blog format and plans for 2022.. I shall be entering my 70th year and I have an urge to complete some online and offline projects  to celebrate. I also would like to revamp the blog in some areas, particularly if they are going to drop the classic editor completely so need to get that done before 31st December.

If you do visit the Cafe and Bookstore, you will see that for the rest of the year I won’t be accepting any new authors. My focus will be on the existing authors, their new books and reviews, and I am planning to feature everyone in the annual Christmas Book Fair.

Next year I want to up my own reviews for authors to hopefully help get their books noticed, and I will be doing some new features throughout the year to promote those in the Cafe.

I will do more on my podcast as well and also I plan on turning some of my own books into audio versions.

I began the blog in 2012.. so a ten year anniversary and in whatever the format it might take,  I am looking forward to sharing it with you.

As always my thanks to William Price King, Debby Gies and Malcolm Allen for their contributions this week.. and to you for visiting, sharing and commenting.

On with the show

– Chart Hits 1980 Part Two- Pink Floyd, Billy Preston and Syreeta Wright, Irene Cara, The Detroit Spinners

Yves – Be careful what you wish for! by Sally Cronin

Zoe Looking to the Future

#Choka – Dress Rehearsal by Sally Cronin

1967 – Portsmouth – Englebert Humperdinck – the Graduate

Turning Back the Clock – Part Five – The Hormone Factor Part Three – by Sally Cronin

Women’s Health – The Heart and Stress – Foods and nutrients needed to support you

Weekly Grocery Shopping List by #Nutrient – Part Three – #Calcium to #Manganese

Over the counter eye drops and possible side-effects by Sally Cronin

#Branding – Psychology and Business by Claire Plaisted.

Emotional Challenges of Being a Writer by Jan Sikes

#Pot Luck – #Short Story – Just My Luck by Abbie Johnson Taylor

Making Annual Plans 2020- Darlene Foster

#Poetry – Behind Closed Doors: A Collection of Unusual Poems by Robbie Cheadle

Book Reviews – Rewind 2017 – #Thriller – His Revenge (John Cannon Book 2) – John W. Howell

Tuesday 19th October 2021 – #StudentAchievements Robbie Cheadle, #RoundUp Carol Taylor, #Editing Paula Readman, #Vancouver #Art Rebecca Budd

#Shortstories #Fairies D.L. Finn, #NewBooks Norah Colvin

New Book on the Shelves – Pre-Order – #Romance -Love, Me: A Christmas Wish Novel by Jacquie Biggar

– #Fantasy Richard Dee, #Horror #Suspence Audrey Driscoll, #Paranormal Romance Marcia Meara

#Poetry Annette Rochelle Aben, #Memoir #Flash Pamela S. Wight, #Western #Folklore Staci Troilo

#Transylvania #History Patricia Furstenberg, #Thriller #Haiti Mark Bierman, #poetry #Shortstories Sally Cronin

October 19th 2021 -Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Security blankets and Dog Days

October 21st 2021 – Malcolm Allen – Typos and Exposure

 

Thanks very much for dropping in and I hope you will join me again next week… Sally

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Podcast – Turning Back the Clock – Part Five – The Hormone Factor Part Three – by Sally Cronin


This health series based on my book Turning Back the Clock which was also a series on radio in 2005 in Spain on The Main Ingredient with Kelli Brett.

Unfortunately the original recording of this post from 2005 was not great audio so I am recording a new version for this post and the next two

Previous podcasts in the series

The Hormone Factor Part Two by Sally Cronin

The Hormone Factor Part One by Sally Cronin

The pH Balance – by Sally Cronin and Kelli Brett

Turning Back the Clock – The Guidelines by Sally Cronin and Kelli Brett

About Turning Back the Clock

Living forever is not an option!

However, feeling younger and looking younger is an option available to all!

The maximum lifespan a human being can currently expect today is around 120 years. However, not many of us really want to be even 90 or 100 years old, if it means that we are going to end up filled with medication and tucked away in a corner in some nursing home, unaware of our surroundings.

Making healthy diet and lifestyle choices as early as possible will help you get as near as possible to your maximum age whilst enjoying good physical and mental vitality. In my latest book I not only take a look at the physical aspects of aging but also the mental and emotional issues that we should address earlier rather than later.

Last time I looked at the health of the brain which is where our hormone health begins and this time a look at the health of the other hormone producing glands
Most of what I talked about when referring to hormone and brain health applies throughout the body. A diet rich in antioxidants such as Vitamin A, C and E and essential fatty acids and amino acids will promote health everywhere. Having created a near perfect working environment for the bosses (the Hypothalamus and the Pituitary), we can turn our attention to the health of the Thyroid (metabolism, energy and growth) Adrenal Gland (sex drive, stress response and metabolism) and Pancreas (Blood sugar levels). If these organs are producing the hormones they are supposed to in the right quantities many of the problems we associate with old age would be much more manageable. Including energy and the ability to process our nutrients efficiently keeping us away from degenerative disease such as arthritis.
Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you have enjoyed the podcast.The immune system keeping you healthy as you age.. As always your feedback is very welcome.. Sally.

You can listen to more podcasts on Sally Cronin on Soundcloud

Amazon: Amazon US – Amazon UK: Amazon UK – More reviews : Goodreads

My latest book is a collection of poetry and was published in July 2021

More details on my books and reviews: Sally’s books and reviews 2021

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Weekly Round Up – 10th – 16th October 2021 – Crows, Robins, Diana Ross, Relationships, Stories, Reviews, Health and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts that you might have missed on Smorgasbord this week.

I hope all is well with you. Quite a bit going on around here with spare parts for the wood burner, tiles to replace cracked ones and other bits and pieces arriving daily. We are still waiting on those who will be installing topsoil, lawn, fixing said wood burner and chimney sweeping but early days yet… no fixed day or week was mentioned in negotiations! When we can ‘fit you in’ seems to be the common phrase you wait patiently.  David will be fixing the tiles himself during the redecoration process so no mystery there.

An earlier photo of Charlie

We believe that Charlie has been back in the garden. We noticed a crow, slightly bigger which is to be expected, but with the same mottled grey markings foraging under the bird feeder, accompanied by a friend. He still has trouble flying but managed to clear the hedge and perch on a telephone line. What made us think it was Charlie was that he wiped his beak from side to side on the line. Because his beak was damaged he did that after eating so we are hoping it was him.

Other than that I am making progress on the writing front and you can read an example in the post that Jane Risdon kindly shared this week…with an excerpt from the next collection.

I was the guest of author Jane Risdon who shared my short story, Miss Lloyd’s Robin, from the new collection due out at the end of the year… I hope you will head over to read.. Thanks to Jane for also showcasing Life is Like a Mosaic…

Guest of author Jane Risdon with a short story

This week William Price King, D.G. Kaye and Daniel Kemp contributed their expertise in the form of music, relationships and humour… they are amazing. Thanks to you for dropping in and the support during the week.. it keeps me motivated.

On with the show

Chart Hits 1980 Part One – Christopher Cross, Dionne Warwick, Diana Ross, Queen

D. G. Kaye Explores the Realms of Relationships – October 2021 – No Contact – The Breaking Point

Walter – Lost and Alone by Sally Cronin

What’s in a Name? – Xenia – Beloved by Sally Cronin

#TankaProse – The Hunter’s Moon by Sally Cronin Posted

New Review #Fantasy #Adventure – The Ferryman and the Sea Witch by D.Wallace Peach

Memories, Music and Movies – 1966 – Manfred Mann, kittens and Georgy Girl

Podcast – Turning Back the Clock – The Hormone Factor Part Two – by Sally Cronin

Women’s Health – The Heart and Stress by Sally Cronin

Weekly Grocery Shopping List by Nutrient – Part Two – Vitamin C to K2 by Sally Cronin

#Finance – Absolutely Necessary Expenses by Sharon Marchisello

#FlashFiction The Last Ride of the Night by D.L. Finn

Do You Know What To Do When One Of Your Blog Posts Gets Reblogged? Hugh W. Roberts

#Offer Marcia Meara, #Teaching Pete Springer, #Writers D.G. Kaye, #RoundUp Carol Taylor, #Halloween John Howell.

Thursday October 14th 2021 – #Humour Joy Lennick, #Interview Terry Tyler, #Booklaunch Mae Clair with Joan Hall.

Smorgasbord Children’s Reading Room – Book Review – Drystan the Dragon and Friends Series, Book 6: Dragana Helps a Fairy by Janice Spina

New Author on the Shelves – #Portugal – #Memoir – Another Day in Paradise by Karen Telling

New Book on the Shelves – #Paranormal, #UrbanFantasy, #Shortstories -Things Old and Forgotten by Mae Clair

#Reviews – #Menopause D.G. Kaye, #Mennonite Marian Longenecker Beaman, #Comingofage Bette A. Stevens

#History #NorthernIreland Jane Buckley, #Mystery James J. Cudney, #SouthernCulture Claire Fullerton

#History #JewishFiction Eva Hnizdo, #Fantasy Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene, #Poetry Balroop Singh

October 12th 2021 -Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Funny Bone and Famous Last Words

October 14th 2021 – Another Open Mic Night with author Daniel Kemp – Recovery Time and Lost in Translation

 

Thanks for dropping in and I hope you have enjoyed the week… thanks Sally.