Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – 26th September – October 2nd 2022 – Hits 2004, Bocelli, Culinary ‘H’ foods, Basking Sharks, Podcast, Reviews, Health and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed during the week here on Smorgasbord.

I know this week has been very difficult for many of you living in the US and in the path of the hurricane weather. I do hope that you are safe and that you didn’t suffer any damage to your homes. You have been in our thoughts.

Nothing much to report on the home front as we carry on getting the small jobs in the house completed and get the garden ready for the autumn. We are keeping an eye on the house selling market and if necessary we may hold off until the spring. Once you get into November and Christmas (sorry to use that word so early) house sales do tail off. We are not in a rush and may well wait until spring when it picks up again. However, at least we will be ready should the opportunity present itself and we will keep an open mind.

Contributor News this week.

William Price King joined me for The Breakfast Show for the second part of chart hits from 2004 and the second post in the series on Andrea Bocelli You can also find William Blog– IMPROVISATIONWilliam Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies​ will be here tomorrow morning with her first post in her Spiritual Awareness series on Angels… and over on her own blog you will find her less than successful attempt to switch internet providers with some lessons we can all learn from. Also links to two visits she made to Resa and Judith Barrow with a nostalgic look at a famous landmark in Toronto and photographic memories. Follow the link to Debby’s posts D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor was here on Wednesday with her  A-Z of food with the letter ‘H’… on her own blog a welcome to October and what is coming up in the month…Monday Musings, a lovely recipe for Mushroom Lasagne, a post on the frightening and appalling statistics on food waste, more of the lovely fragrant leaves we can use in our cooking and Saturday Snippets where the prompt word was ‘Rain‘ -Head over to enjoy CarolCooks2 weekly roundup… 25th September -1st October 2022

Thank you too for all your visits, comments and shares during the week. As always very much appreciated…♥

 

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 2004 Part Two – Dido, No Doubt, Kylie Minogue, Britney Spears

William Price King meets the Music Legends – #Classical – Andrea Bocelli – Pavarotti, Celine Dion, Awards 1990s

‘H’ is for Honey, Hamburgers, Hummus, Herbs, Haggis and Hoisin Sauce

#Ireland #Waterford 1950s – The Sea Angler’s Club by Geoff Cronin

#Ireland #Waterford 1950s – Achill Island and Keem Bay Shark by Geoff Cronin

Podcast – #Poetry and #Flash – Cats at Play and My Mouse by Sally Cronin

Ancient Healing Therapies – #Tai Chi – Non-Combative Chinese Martial Art by Sally Cronin

Size Matters: The Sequel – #Morbid Obesity – Putting your Healthy Eating Plan together Part One #Measurements #Motivation by Sally Cronin

#Malaya #1950s – The Girl Who Taught Herself to Fly by Kwan Kew Lai

Book Reviews – September 2022 – #Poetry #Prose Lauren Scott, #Fantasy D.Wallace Peach, #Biography #Humour John Cornelius Rogers and Sue Bavey

New Book on the Shelves – #Contemporary #Romance – Falling by Stevie Turner

How To Prevent Leishmaniasis In Your Dog When Travelling In Europe by Jacqueline Lambert

#Pethealth – Pets Eat Grass – Why? by Nikki Frie

A Valentine Gift by Gwen Plano

#Children #Reading by Sue Wickstead

#History – Pump Organs by Joy Neal Kidney

Best Medicine 2022 – Host Malcolm Allen – WFH and Bagpipes

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Family Photos and Ramblings

 

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week… Sally.

 

Smorgasbord Health Column – Size Matters: The Sequel – #Morbid Obesity – Putting your Healthy Eating Plan together Part One #Measurements #Motivation by Sally Cronin


This is the updated and fifth edition of Size Matters and I had intended to release in 2021 for the 25th anniversary of my initial weight loss. However, with everything else going on in the world it did not seem appropriate to celebrate when people’s minds were fixed on survival in lockdown. Although this serialisation ontains much of the original material in relation to my own personal story, the programme has evolved over the last 25 years.

Although I studied nutritional therapy back in the mid-1990s, I have continued my studies and developed new programmes for healthy eating that are tailor made for the individual rather than a one size fits all. I still believe that the key elements of this basic weight loss programme I will share with you in this updated version works. Even when I work with clients who have arthritis or diabetes, I still approach their programmes from the three dimensions that I outline in this book.

Last week I shared how you can determine how much weight you should lose to be healthy

You can read the previous post: HERE

Our physical approach, our mental attitude and our emotions are all factors in how we overcome disease and obesity, and should all be addressed when looking for the right programme that will work for each individual.

Putting your Eating Plan together Part One #Measurements #Motivation

So far in this series I have covered the basics of how you might have become overweight, and some strategies to put in place to make sure you are successful, however much you weight you need to shed. This included making sure you deal with any underlying health issues such as Candida Albicans and getting your willpower in shape. Last week I shared the abundance of food that you can eat as get to a healthy weight and now it is time to put those foods together in an eating plan.

Because this is a longer than usual chapter… I am posting over two segments this week and next.

Creating Your Own Plan

So now it is your turn.

Weigh yourself.

I hate bathroom scales with a vengeance. They can sabotage a healthy eating programme as quick as anything. They are not always reliable, if old, the measurements are off and if you do not lose weight one week you can get demoralised and give up.

I suggest that you find a chemist or other outlet that has accurate scales and visit every two weeks – same day and time if you can – on the way to work perhaps.

I try to find one that does not shout the results across the shop floor!

Some of these also have a blood pressure cuff so another measurement to check on a regular basis. Do still have your BP taken officially along with your LDL cholesterol levels and Blood Sugar with your doctor or the pharmacy after 6–8 weeks.

To be honest, I find using a different method to measure progress can be more motivating.

  • One is to take a photograph, full length of you today and stick it somewhere you see it every day.
  • In 6 weeks time having been following your new regimen of natural unprocessed foods and got into an increased activity programme, take another and compare them.
  • I think you will be pleasantly surprised, especially if you wear the same clothes you did in the first photograph.. They should feel a lot looser and it will show.

Another option is to find an item of clothing that is a size too small and every week on the same day try it on.

  • Keep going until you fit into it. Be realistic.
  • If you are a size 20, don’t think that you are going to be in a size 10 in six weeks.
  • Start with a size 18 and then a size smaller every four to six weeks should be about the right time scale.

A note here, unfortunately, we women lose weight from the top down usually. One of the reasons being is that we have different hips and thighs to men. We bear children and the fat in those regions would be used to nourish the baby when we are pregnant. So perhaps an idea would be to find a top of some kind or jacket to compare sizing for the first few weeks.

Determine your frame size and decide what weight you need to be by using the BMR calculator and the addition of normal activity and exercise per day. If you missed that post here is the link How much should you weigh?

Remember: It is not healthy to lose masses of body weight too quickly.

  • You start to lose muscle instead of fat and that is not good in the long term.
  • When you lose muscle and then come off your diet, you don’t have the necessary muscle to burn fat, any excess beyond what your body uses up each day will be popped into the fat cells for safe-keeping.
  • That is why when you eat too few calories on a ‘crash’ diet, you put on even more weight than you started with.

Having said that, if you are steadily increasing your activity level, you can sustain a healthy loss of 2–3 lbs (1–1.5 kg) a week, because you are building muscle as you lose the fat.

Most one-dimensional diets work on the assumption that you walk three times a week for 20 minutes. This is hardly enough time to get out of breath! If you are walking for an hour every day, you will be achieving seven times that amount of exercise and will soon see the benefit in additional weight loss and toning.

The weight loss will always be quicker at first, but, if you average it out over a 20–week period, it usually works out to 2.5 lbs (1 kg) per week. You do not need to do the entire hour at once. Intensive and brisk walking for 20 minutes, three times a day can actually be more effective. Also, you are more likely to sustain the level of exercise in smaller segments. For me, I find that if I listen to rock music it keeps me at a good pace although does solicit some odd looks from passers by.

As always, especially if you are very overweight, you should not launch into an aggressive exercise program without first talking to your medical adviser.

Without the use of technical equipment, and complex calculations, it is generally difficult to calculate an individual’s calorific usage during an hour of exercise. To keep it simple, I have listed only a few exercises and divided them into two main groups: Moderate and Heavy (I will cover excercise in more detail in a later post).

Moderate exercise:

Walking, cycling and swimming. These use approximately 300 calories an hour. You should then add 10 calories for every 14 lbs (6.5 kg) you are overweight.

Heavy exercise:

Aerobics, mountain biking, running, and football. These use approximately 500 calories an hour. Here you need to add 20 calories for every 14 lbs (6.5 kg) you are overweight.

Basic Summary:

• Weigh yourself.
• Determine your frame size.
• Decide on your ideal weight.
• Calculate the weight loss required to achieve this weight.
• Determine the amount of calories you need each day to provide basic nutrition – BMR – then add in basic daily activity and exercise.
• Without going below your BMR – around the 1500 calories for a woman and 1800 for a man – design your healthy eating programme to provide a 500 to 750 calorie deficit per day to achieve 1–2 lbs weight loss per week.

Toning muscle can result in less weightloss.

It is worth noting that some weeks you may lose less than in others. As you increase your activity level, you will be toning up and this will create more muscle. Muscle weighs more than fat and so you may find that you have lost inches instead of pounds. However, in my experience, it usually seems to average out to about 2–2.5 lbs (0.9–1.1 kg) per week. Think long term, and do not become too obsessed with the day-to-day loss of weight.

I suggest that you keep a journal as I did.. I would list my food intake for the day in detail, plus fluids and the exercise. I weighed myself every Monday morning and made a record of weight lost, gained or stayed the same. If there was gain or I had stayed the same weight, I would take a look at the food and see is anything had slipped in or if I had been doing less exercise.


How much fat should I eat each day?

At this point I think it is important to remember that our bodies have been evolving for a very long time – in a hundred thousand years our DNA will only have altered about ten times – I have said before that the body does not react to sudden changes very well! However, in the last 300 years and particularly the last 150 years since the industrial revolution we have thrown some curve balls at our bodies.

Processed foods with manufactured artificial ingredients is just one area where our nutritional needs are not being met – one of the others, which is the real demon in our diet, is refined sugars – addictive – available from birth to grave, within hand’s reach in shops, in our own fridges and store cupboards – and laboratory constructed fats to extend the sell-by-date on ready meals and other processed foods in our daily diet. No wonder our bodies are in melt-down with increased health issues that lead to Heart disease, Cancers and Dementia.

But back to fats …

We must not cut fats out of our diet – they have an essential role to play in our health and without fats and cholesterol our bodies will be open to infections, poor function in areas such as the brain, heart, reproductive system and our eyesight. I use the 80/20 rule with my diet because I have to be watch my weight – 20% of my diet comprises healthy fats – sometimes I will have more because I am out for a meal etc. but basically my everyday diet comprises mainly seasonal vegetables and fruit, whole grain rice, fish, chicken, red meat once a week, eggs, moderate dairy.

No one person’s diet is the same and you have to find the perfect balance for you and this includes your fat intake – as long as it is not harmful fats.

Briefly, a quick look at the fats you are likely to encounter in your daily diet:

• One fat to avoid all together is not naturally occurring at all and that is manufactured ‘Trans Fats” Liquid oil is hydrogenated to extend its shelf life but in the process Trans fatty acids are formed – found in most processed foods including margarines and snacks such as microwave popcorn, biscuits, cakes, packaged puddings etc.

• The other fat type, which in large quantities is not helpful in maintaining cholesterol levels, is saturated fat – if there is too much in your diet it will raise your total Cholesterol as well as the LDL (low density lipoprotein which is smaller and clumps in arteries, and I call it Lousy Cholesterol). Mainly found in animal products but also some seafood. However, provided you are not eating the rich fat around a steak or roast every day, or eating a block of cheese three times a week, or a pound of butter on your spuds, you can enjoy what is very tasty component of your diet in moderation.

Personally I would rather have a small amount of real grass fed dairy butter with all its nutritional value, than a large dollop of low fat chemically processed glop……

Cholesterol is an essential element of many of the chemical reactions in the body including our brain health and our hormones. Dropping it too low can have an impact on our long-term health.

• The fats classified as healthy fats are Monounsaturated fats – which lower total cholesterol and at the same time lower LDL and increase HDL (High Density Lipoprotein and which I call Healthy Cholesterol) – this is contained in nuts, like walnuts and olive oil.

• Polyunsaturated fats also lower total cholesterol and LDL and these are found in salmon, soya, sunflower oils etc and have a very important component Omega-3 fatty acids. These can not only reduce your LDL and support HDL but are also very helpful in reducing blood pressure and the risk of developing blood clots. Even with people who have already suffered a heart attack including Omega-3 fatty acids in their diet reduces their risk of a fatal attack.

We love fish and it is very easy to include oily fish at least three times a week. Some of the best for Omega-3 fatty acids are salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines and Albacore Tuna.

At this point a word about cooking your healthy meals – Olive oil is great but not so good when heated to a really high temperature to cook your steak or fish. It should be Extra Virgin Olive oil so that it has not been over processed – do not be tempted to use the light versions!

Use to drizzle over your meat, fish, vegetables, jacket potato etc after cooking – steam bake your food – if you are eating steak put in the oven in a pan with a grid so that the excess fat drains off – if you fancy a little butter on your vegetables, why not – great taste.

A little more info on Olive Oil – great stuff – potent mix of anti-oxidants that can lower the LDL but leave the HDL untouched – obviously if you are overweight it does have a high fat and calorie count but much better to use the Extra Virgin version and get the health benefits than use the diet alternatives.

I also use coconut oil for cooking and I have the liquid oil as a dressing, it is organic and has no additives and mixed with a little balsamic vinegar makes a delicious addition to salads.

The greatest gift you can give you body and its cholesterol is to avoid eating processed store bought cakes, biscuits, crackers some cheap breads, pasta dishes etc. If you make your own from scratch using butter and eat occasionally you will get a better tasting and healthier alternative.

To summarise – do not take fats out of your diet – use unprocessed, natural ingredients in your cooking, use fats and oils in moderation, eat plenty of vegetables, seasonal fruits, whole grains, dairy and eggs. 

©sally cronin Just Food for Health 1998 – 2022

Next time part two of this stage of your weight loss with a check on portion sizes.

A little bit about me nutritionally. .

About Sally Cronin

I am a qualified nutritional therapist with twenty-four years experience working with clients in Ireland and the UK as well as being a health consultant on radio in Spain.

Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 21 years ago, based on my own weight loss of 154lbs. My first clinic was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Since then I have written a men’s health manual, and anti-aging programme, articles for magazines, radio programmes and posts here on Smorgasbord.

You can buy my books from: Amazon US – and: Amazon UK – Follow me :Goodreads – Twitter: @sgc58 – Facebook: Sally Cronin – LinkedIn: Sally Cronin

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘H’ is for Honey, Hamburgers, Hummus, Herbs, Haggis and Hoisin Sauce


Welcome to a repeat of the series from Carol Taylor, the wonderful Culinary A – Z and a reminder, not only of the amazing variety of food we have available to us today from around the world, but delicious recipes to showcase them. Carol also introduces to cooking methods and kitchen equipment that assist in creating meals for all occasions.

Welcome once again to Carols Cooking Column and today in my culinary trawl we have the letter H.

The choices on what to showcase were many and I had quite a hard time deciding which ones to feature. Otherwise, you could be looking at something akin to War and Peace and we all want peace in our kitchens don’t we?

Honey: Also known as the… Nectar of the Gods.

Where do I get my honey? Well, my first bottle, I was sitting on the beach with my sundowner, fending off the ever-present sellers of touristy bits and bobs, when a man appeared carrying a very heavy-looking bucket. What did he have? Well, I had to look and what a surprise, it was fresh, very fresh honeycomb, and he strained the most glorious bottle of fresh honey. I just had to purchase it, the taste was so fresh and very slightly scented, amazing and a beautiful golden colour.And enjoy!

Now I have moved to the North of Thailand I get my honey straight from the comb, I am so lucky and I know that and it is beautiful.

I always take a little apple cider vinegar with a spoonful of honey in hot water first thing in the morning, on an empty tummy. I have been taking it for a couple of years. It is said to fight off joint inflammation and I don’t suffer from joint pain or anything.

Honey mixed with Dijon mustard makes a lovely glaze for BBQ meats.

Or one of my favourites is honey and chilli glaze

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup of honey
  • 1 tbsp. of Red chillies finely chopped,
  • 1 tbsp. of Green chillies finely chopped,
  • 1 tbsp. of fresh Lime juice,

Mix all together and leave for 1 hour in the fridge it is then ready to use.

Another wonderful dip for a cold meat platter on a lovely spring/summers day…has cloves and soy sauce.

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp. oil,
  • 3 garlic cloves chopped,
  • 1/2-1 tsp. red pepper flakes,
  • 1/3 cup honey,
  • 2 tsp. soy sauce,
  • 2 tsp. rice vinegar,
  • ¼ to ½ cup water
  • and 2 tsp. cornstarch.

Let’s cook

  1. In a small bowl stir together the honey, soy sauce, rice vinegar, ¼ cup of water and the cornstarch.
  2. Put the oil in a medium saucepan over a medium heat and let the mix warm up for about 30 seconds,
  3. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant and just starting to color, 15-20 seconds max.
  4. Add the red pepper flakes and cook for another 15-30 seconds until garlic is very lightly browned.
  5. Restir the honey mixture and pour into the saucepan, bring to a simmer stirring, reduce the heat and simmer for 5 mins stirring frequently.
  6. Add more water if desired.

You now have a lovely dip for your cold platter.

What I also love is chilli infused honey.

  1. Place honey in a saucepan and warm until it reaches 180 degrees on a sugar thermometer.
  2. Watch it carefully so it doesn’t burn.
  3. Then pour your honey over a jar of chillies.
  4. Cool to room temperature.

Beautiful with meat or fish.

Enjoy!

Hamburger:

The hamburger or burger as most commonly called first appeared around the 19th century or early 20th century and the evidence suggest that it originated in the U.S.A and consisted of two pieces of bread and a ground beefsteak. How far has it evolved since then??

There are great burgers and there are the worst burgers you could ever eat. Me I am not a fan of the burger and on the odd occasion when we do have them I make my own. There are the schools of thought of which the late Anthony Bourdain was one that a burger should be just that and not have so much in it that you couldn’t get your mouth around it. I have seen pictures of some huge ones so I do tend to agree with him that less is more.

My favourite burger is a beef, red, onion and parmesan burger.

Ingredients:

  • 350 gm. best beef mince or mince your own
  • 1 med red onion very finely chopped reserving a few whole rings of onion to go in the burger.
  • 2 med eggs yolks beaten
  • 25 gm. breadcrumbs
  • 1/4 tsp. chilli powder
  • 1/4 tsp. ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 tsp. oregano
  • 35 gm. parmesan cheese
  • Olive Oil
  • Sea Salt
  • Freshly ground pepper.

Let’s Cook!

  1. If you are cooking your burgers on the BBQ then the first job is to get the BBQ going as you want it nice and hot.
  2. Chop the onion finely and blitz in the food processor…add the egg yolks with the breadcrumbs, spices and Dijon mustard mix to combine.
  3. Finely grate the parmesan and mix in well.
  4. Add the mince and season well…I always cook a tiny little patty as a tester that way it is easier to adjust the seasoning.
  5. I find mixing with your hands is a good way to combine the ingredients properly once mixed then form into the sized burgers you require.
  6. Cover with cling film and leave in the fridge for 10 minutes or so to firm up before putting onto the BBQ or grill.
  7. Drizzle with olive oil and season when you put them on the griddle and cook for 4 mins each side more if you like your burgers well done.
  8. Once the burgers are done then let them rest for a few minutes before putting them in the burger bun.
  9. Serve in a toasted bun with sliced red onion and relish of your choice. Plain and simple but really tasty.

Herbs:

Fresh Herbs are something that I always have in my fridge and my garden, Don’t you?

Also, I want to show you that it is not time-consuming to give your food that little extra pizzaz…Food should be tempting, it should be fun and enjoyable as well as being good for you…and the occasional treat…Have it! Enjoy it! Safe in the knowledge that most of the time what you and your family are eating is good, healthy food… but never boring!

Some herbs you can grow at home and pick them fresh knowing that they are pesticide free. How satisfying is that???

They are also something that I sometimes forget that I have or keep meaning to use and end up throwing them away. Does the same thing happen in your house?

It is always those tender herbs like coriander, basil, mint, parsley or chives…The hardy herbs are the ones I always keep in the freezer.

Well, no more will I be throwing away my herbs I decided that I would use my herbs more or less immediately or do something with them.

I think herbs always lift an ordinary dish and make it a little bit more special for example, if you are having a salad just snip a few herbs and toss them in with your normal salad vegetables or if you fancy a salad and have no salad in the fridge then a salad made of freshly picked herbs from the garden or the hedgerow makes a refreshing change.
Freeze some chopped herbs in ice-cube trays and then all have to do is drop one or two into your cooking when herbs are needed.

Or make some lovely herb butter ideal for melting over your fish or dropping in a sauce.

Add mint leaves to that bowl of ice cream see how much more refreshing it is.

Half and Half:

Half and half known as single cream in the UK is a blend of whole milk and light cream it also cannot be whipped. It does, of course, have a higher fat content than ordinary milk but adds that touch of creaminess to sauces, coffee, ice cream bases, rice pudding, mashed potatoes it has many uses in the kitchen. It is, however, better to add at the end of your cooking as if you overheat it then it will curdle.

Hangtown Fry:

What an intriguing name? It is a type of omelette with the original and most common version being made of Oysters, bacon, and eggs which sounds like a wonderful combo to me. It was originally made famous in the Californian Gold Rush in the 1850’s there are also many tales surrounding this dish from prisoners on death row ordering one as there last meal knowing that the Oysters have to be shipped in; so many tales I am sure there is a book somewhere.

Hull:

Quite simply to hull means to remove the stems of fruit like strawberries without just slicing the top of which not only wastes some of the lovely fruit it spoils the look of the fruit.

Hotpot:

Originating from Lancashire in North West England it is made of lamb or mutton and onions topped with sliced potatoes and cooked slowly in the oven…

I have happy memories of my mums hotpot she used to use scrag of lamb and top the dish with potatoes which would soak up some of the lovely meat juices and be deliciously golden brown on top…

Hummus:homemade

Combine ingredients

  • 3 tbsp Tahini Paste with
  • 2 tbsp fresh Lemon Juice and blitz in food processor.
  • Add 2tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 clove Garlic,
  • ½ tsp ground Cumin and a
  • ½-1 tsp salt and blitz

To prepare

  1. Then add half of drained, rinsed can of chickpeas and again blitz 1-2 mins.
  2. Add the other half of Chick Peas and blitz again 1-2 mins.
  3. Put in a suitable container or serving bowl drizzle with tbsp Olive Oil and sprinkle with Paprika.

Voila, it’s now ready to eat with Sliced pitta bread or cut up vegetables of your choice.
This will keep up to 1 week in the fridge.

Haggis:

Haggis is traditionally served on Burns Night which is a Scottish Celebration of the famous Rabbie Burns a Scots poet. Made from sheep’s pluck ( heart, liver and lungs) which is minced and mixed with oatmeal, suet, onions, spice, salt and moistened with a rich stock it is then cooked in an animals stomach and served with neeps( swede/turnip) and tatties( potatoes) and of course a dram of Scotch Whisky to wash it down.

Hoisin Sauce:

Hoisin sauce is a thick, fragrant sauce commonly used in Chinese cuisine as a glaze for meat, an addition to stir fries, or as dipping sauce. It is darkly-colored in appearance and sweet and salty in taste. Although regional variants exist, hoisin sauce usually includes soybeans, fennel, red chili peppers, and garlic.

Harvard Beets:

What are Harvard beets and how do they differ from normal pickled beets…? Harvard beets are coated in a warm sauce. The beets are pre-cooked for both preparations. Pickled beets are made with sugar, vinegar and pickling spices, and are served chilled. …

Harvard beets use sugar plus vinegar or lemon juice, but cornstarch or butter is then added to create a thick sauce.

Thank you for reading I hope you have enjoyed this little trip through the Culinary alphabet…Until next time when it will be the letter I.

About Carol Taylor

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetables ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use have to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: Amazon US

Connect to Carol – Blog: Carol Cooks 2 – Twitter: @CarolCooksTwo – Facebook: Carol Taylor

 

My thanks to Carol for creating this wonderful series and we hope that you have enjoyed. As always we are delighted to receive your feedback and if you could share that would be great.. thanks Sally.

 

Smorgasbord Health Column – Ancient Healing Therapies – #Tai Chi – Non-Combative Chinese Martial Art by Sally Cronin


A short series on some of the ancient healing therapies that you can still benefit from today.

I went to Tai Chi for a few classes when I was looking after my mother, but it became difficult to leave her on a regular schedule, but I did practice the moves at home to stay flexible and to help my breathing.

Ancient Healing Therapies – #Tai Chi – Non-Combative Chinese Martial Art

What is Tai Chi?

This is a non-combative martial art that combines breathing techniques with a series of slow movements often replicating the actions of birds and animals. It promotes the flow of vital energy (chi) throughout the body promoting health and calm.

It is also used to aid meditation and there is one technique that I found really demonstrates the gentle power of the art and is a great place to start to focus your mind and body.

Health Benefits of Tai Chi

There is some research into the various benefits of the technique, and certainly for those of us over 65 it has been found to reduce stress, improve posture as well as increasing muscle strength in the muscles in the legs. This may have an impact on balance, flexibility and mobility. This might also help prevent the elderly from falls and improve arthritic conditions. It is a gentle but weight bearing exercise to might also improve bone density.

Although most of the exercises are in the standing position there is also no reason why you cannot complete the arm movements and strengthen your core and shoulder muscles whilst sitting.

Suitable for all ages.   If you were to drive through a Chinese city you would find the parks and empty spaces filled with groups of men, women and children attending a Tai Chi class. Perfect for the family to enjoy together. Great for children and in China the day often start with a 30 minute class.

Here are just two of the many exercises that are part of this technique and I hope you will explore this amazing form of exercise for yourselves.

Kong Jing to relax and focus your mind.

  1. If you can sit on a mat on the floor with your legs crossed that is the most effective position. But if like me you have knee problems, sit on a straight- backed chair and cross you legs at the ankles.
  2. Rub your palms together rapidly to the count of 10 seconds ( there are a number of ways to time that… one one thousand, two one thousand, three one thousand or one Mississippi two Mississippi etc)
  3. Place one palm slightly cupped above the other 15cm apart.
  4. Keeping your eyes closed, imagine that you have a spongy ball between your palms and gently press them together until you feel some resistance (it is weird at first as you know there is no actual ball between your palms) Do not let your hands touch.
  5. The feeling is best described as magnetic. If you have ever held a magnet in each hand and moved them together you will begin to feel a slight repelling sensation the closer you get. You might also experience a feeling of warmth or tingling in your fingers.
  6. Hold that feeling of resistance for five minutes and in subsequent sessions increase until you are holding that position for 15 minutes.

You should find that after a few sessions that you are less stressed and also that you breathing has slowed and your heartbeat dropped slightly as the body relaxes.

I would like to share one more exercise with you which you can use as a warm up before a Tai Chi class or on its own to unwind at the end of the day and boost your energy. If you do have a dry, level spot in the garden on grass, where you can stand barefoot, then that is fantastic.

N.B. It is advisable not to do Tai Chi if you are suffering from any joint injuries especially shoulder and knee.. always check with your doctor or physiotherapist first. However, once you are healed this gentle exercise might prevent further injuries.

  1. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, with your knees slightly bent.
  2. Relax your shoulders and upper body and hold your head balanced as if someone had tied a ribbon to the hair on the crown of your head and was pulling it upwards.
  3. Your hands should be down by your sides, palms facing backwards and slightly apart from your body.
  4. Breathe naturally and allow you mind to empty.
  5. Shift all your weight onto your right foot and gently lift your arms up in front of you to shoulder height.
  6. Keep your palms facing downwards and your fingers pointing to the floor.
  7. Transfer all your weight to the left foot and in one easy flowing motion, lower your arms down to your sides.
  8. Bend your wrists to that your hands are parallel to the floor facing forwards.
  9. Transfer your weight to your right foot, raising your arms again to shoulder height and then transfer all your weight to the left and lower the arms again.
  10. Repeat this flowing motion in a rhythmic sequence until if becomes effortless and without you thinking about the process.
  11. Build up the repetitions until you are practicing this every day for 15 minutes.

You should find that after a week or two your muscles, particularly in the shoulders and legs are more toned and that breathing and your circulation are improved.

Here is a video with instructions in English from a Hong Kong teacher to show you the beginning moves.

Here is a directory for classes in the UK and wherever you live you should be able to find a similar directory: Taoist.org class locations

And to show you that you are never too young to feel the benefits of the discipline…..so cute. Leeds Taekwondo

Thanks for dropping in today and hope you have found the post interesting.. Sally

©Sally Cronin Just Food for Health 1998- 2022

A little bit about me nutritionally. .

About Sally Cronin

I am a qualified nutritional therapist with twenty-four years experience working with clients in Ireland and the UK as well as being a health consultant on radio in Spain.

Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 21 years ago, based on my own weight loss of 154lbs. My first clinic was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Since then I have written a men’s health manual, and anti-aging programme, articles for magazines, radio programmes and posts here on Smorgasbord.

You can buy my books from: Amazon US – and: Amazon UK – Follow me :Goodreads – Twitter: @sgc58 – Facebook: Sally Cronin – LinkedIn: Sally Cronin

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – 19th – 25th September 2022 – Hits 2004, Andrea Bocelli, Spiritual Awareness, Waterford Stories, Book reviews, Podcast, Health and Humour


Welcome to the posts from the week here on Smorgasbord that you might have missed.

Not a great deal to report this week on the home front. We have some areas that we think would benefit from some more work and that is okay. To be honest if we slip to the end of October we might consider waiting until the spring as a more appropriate time to sell. We are in no rush and the garden would look better then too. We shall see what happens. In the meantime plenty to be getting on with.

The weather is definitely on the turn but still some nice days and I have quite a bit of online work to catch up on anyway.

I am going to be working on my own WIP or two over the next few weeks as well as things around the house, so I have scheduled ahead. I will be in and out obviously to catch up with comments and your blogs.

Contributor News this week.

William Price King joined me for The Breakfast Show for the first part of chart hits from 2004 and the first in the new series on Andrea Bocelli You can also find William Blog– IMPROVISATIONWilliam Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies​ was here on Monday with her next post in her Spiritual Awareness series… and over on her own blog you will find her introduction to her new podcast Grief Talk, a wonderful Q&A with Alex Craigie and her Sunday Book Review for Falling by Stevie Turner. Follow the link to Debby’s posts D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor will be here on Wednesday with her  A-Z of food with the letter ‘H’… on her own blog Monday Musings, Homemade Chicken Curry with Bamboo, the Cuisine of Estonia, more aromatic leaves with the Maple and Saturday Snippets where the prompt was Curve. Head over to enjoy Carol’s Weekly Round Up

Thank you too for all your visits, comments and shares during the week. As always very much appreciated…♥

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 2004 Part One – Hoobastank, Maroon 5, Keith Urban. Alicia Keys

 

William Price King meets the Music Legends – #Classical – Andrea Bocelli – The Early Years

Spiritual Awareness – How Do You Know If You Are An Empath – The Signs by D.G. Kaye

Podcast – #Poetry and #Flash – A Dog’s Life and Runaway by Sally Cronin

Milestones Along the Way – #Ireland – Shakespeare and Traditional Fencing Methods by Geoff Cronin

Milestones Along the Way – #Ireland #Waterford 1950s The Saga of Selby by Geoff Cronin

Size Matters: The Sequel – #Morbid Obesity – Delicious foods you can eat on a healthy #weightloss programme by Sally Cronin

Ancient Healing Therapies – Reflexology by Sally Cronin

#Biography – #Poetry – #Life – Daydreams and Narcoleptic Nightmares: Memoirs and Poems by John Cornelius Rogers

#WednesdayWonders – Lapis Lazuli by Jan Sikes

#Family – Memories in Photographs by Darlene Foster

#Nostalgia #Writing by Elizabeth Gauffreau

#Children’s – #New – #Playtime – David’s Bathtime Adventure by Sue Wickstead

#Comingofage #Fantasy – The Evil You Choose: Dreamer’s Alliance – Book 2 by Dan Antion

#Occult #Ghosts The Haunting of Chatham Hollow by Mae Clair and Staci Troilo

– Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – #Court and #Caught

Another Open Mic Night with author Daniel Kemp – Energy and Candle Power

 

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week.. Sally

Smorgasbord Health Column – Size Matters: The Sequel – #Morbid Obesity – Delicious foods you can eat on a healthy #weightloss programme by Sally Cronin


This is the updated and fifth edition of Size Matters and I had intended to release in 2021 for the 25th anniversary of my initial weight loss. However, with everything else going on in the world it did not seem appropriate to celebrate when people’s minds were fixed on survival in lockdown. Although this serialisation ontains much of the original material in relation to my own personal story, the programme has evolved over the last 25 years.

Although I studied nutritional therapy back in the mid-1990s, I have continued my studies and developed new programmes for healthy eating that are tailor made for the individual rather than a one size fits all. I still believe that the key elements of this basic weight loss programme I will share with you in this updated version works. Even when I work with clients who have arthritis or diabetes, I still approach their programmes from the three dimensions that I outline in this book.

Last week I shared how you can determine how much weight you should lose to be healthy

You can read the previous post: HERE

Our physical approach, our mental attitude and our emotions are all factors in how we overcome disease and obesity, and should all be addressed when looking for the right programme that will work for each individual.

Delicious foods you can eat on a healthy #weightloss programme

Most eating programmes to lose weight will emphasise all the foods that you cannot eat.

This to me is crazy as in fact they are far outweighed by the number of foods that you can eat. This is why we head into a weight loss programme already feeling deprived.

As a rule of thumb when preparing your menu for the week and a shopping list; select anything that has been taken from the ground, picked from a tree, allowed to roam free and graze naturally and comes from a cold sea environment rather than a fish farm.

Anything that is wrapped in plastic or cardboard should be treated with suspicion as should the really cheap options. Also whilst it is convenient to buy your vegetables ready chopped they will have lost up to 50% of their nutritional value in the first week after being chopped and more as the days go by. Think about what an apple looks like after only a few minutes being exposed to the air. Usually good quality frozen food is chopped and prepared immediately so you can use that as an alternative.

I know what it is like to work on a budget but I do believe that a little of the good stuff goes a long way in flavour, nutritional content and your health. The few pounds that you might save on your weekly shopping is a great deal less significant than the impact on your health by eating industrialised foods.

Tailor making your own eating programme to suit your tastes and requirements.

This chapter shows how to go about designing your own program. It will be more effective if you make the choices for your meals based on the foods you most enjoy. In this way, you are more likely to stick to the program and learn what foods make you feel, and look, healthier and fitter.

Before you even look at the food side of the program, you must sit down and think out your strategy for losing weight. You already have some tools. For instance, you now know how to establish the ideal weight for your height, frame, age and activity level. You should have completed your ‘compelling reasons for losing weight’ sheet and you should also have set yourself realistic goals for the weeks ahead. Having established your targets, you now need to design a food program to achieve that result.

There is no one dietary program that suits everyone. We are all different and our likes and dislikes have been shaped by childhood experiences and habits we have acquired over the years. I could suggest a balanced and nutritious program to follow seven days a week. However, if half the foods on the program are ones you dislike or have never tried, then you will be bored within a few days and fed up with trying to find something to eat. You will be likely to give up.

The purpose of this program is to find a dietary regime that you can live with for life. This is not just a means of getting into that outfit for a wedding or birthday, it is about fitting your diet to your lifestyle and personal preferences so that you can live with it forever.
Before you begin designing your program, you need to establish the tools you need to put the program together. Later in the book you will find some detailed lists from which you can choose.

There are three main food groups: fruit and vegetables, carbohydrates and proteins. These are the building blocks for your program. There are also the incidentals, which can be added sparingly, such as alcohol.

I really do not mind what you eat as long as it is not out of a packet. If it is natural, unprocessed and only seasoned with what you choose to add then you are on the right track.

Group one foods – Fruit & Vegetables

This group consists of fruit and vegetables, and I have included as many as I can think of. Mark your preferences a, b and c;

a) For those fruit and vegetables that you eat on a regular basis;
b) For those that you might eat if you are out or if someone cooks for you;
c) For those that you have never tried or that you dislike.

It is important to eat from preferences b) and c) as well as preference a). You need the widest possible variety in your diet. Sticking to one or two favourite vegetables or fruit would mean that you could well be missing out on some important vitamins and minerals. It is also easy to get bored with a diet that is too limited.

Cook the same vegetable in many different ways, so look at the list as an exciting adventure into taste and texture. This is not a recipe book, so get hold of a good one. Vegetarian cookery books tend to have the most interesting ways to cook vegetables, but adjust the fat content where necessary.

The best approach is to eat from your preference a) foods every day and try one from your preference b) and c) once or twice a week. You will find, that as your sweet tooth disappears, many vegetables you once thought were too bitter now taste much nicer. I am sure this is why children do not like vegetables when they come off semi-solids. The sugar in the food they have been eating has conditioned their taste buds so that fresh foods taste bitter. This can flavour our opinion about a particular vegetable into adulthood.

Here is a list of fruits and vegetables to form your preferred list for daily and then a list for once or twice a week. Do not be afraid to try new varieties and this will increase your opportunity to obtain the widest possible range of nutrients. This list is not all inclusive as you will have different fruits and vegetables in your neck of the woods and eating seasonally and locally is always a good thing.

You will find that I have mixed the fruit and vegetables and some herbs into this list and left you to put into the lists. One of the reasons is I think you will be surprised how few varieties of fruit and vegetables you are currently consuming. It is so easy to get into a rut!

Apple, artichoke, asparagus, aubergine (eggplant)avocado, banana, beetroot, blackberry, blueberry, Bok Choy (Chinese Cabbage) broccoli, cabbage, cantaloupe melon, capers, carrots, cauliflower, celeriac, celery, chard, chicory, chives, cilantro, coconut, corn, cucumber, danelion, dill, endive, fennel, figs, garlic, gherkins, ginger, grapes, guava, Kale, leeks, lettuce, lychee, macadamia nuts, mango, melon, mushrooms, nectarines, Papaya, parsley, parsnip, passion fruit, peach, plum, peas, pears, pecans, peppers, pineapple, pomegranate, potato, pumpkin, radish, raspberry, rhubarb, saffron, sea kale, shallot, soybeans, spinach, squash, strawberries, sweet corn, sweet potatoes, Swiss chard, tomato, turnip, water chestnuts, watercress, watermelon, Yams.

Group two foods – Carbohydrates

This is the carbohydrate group. Do not fall into the trap of thinking, that because foods in this group are low in fat, they will help you to be slim. Also, whole grains in moderation are a super addition to any healthy eating plan but you need to manage your intake to balance with the amount of your daily activity. Couch potatoes do not need that much energy.

Pasta, for instance, has 350 calories per 100 gm dry weight. It is very easy to eat 200 gm of pasta, which is 700 calories, and this is before you put a sauce on top. You could easily consume your entire 1,500 calorie allowance in one go if you were not careful. In comparison, potatoes have only 86 calories per 100 gm. However, the problem with potatoes is that they taste so much better with fats or sauces! A drizzle of olive oil or a small knob of butter with some herbs is fine.

Breakfast cereals are also in this group. Unfortunately, most of the processed products contain quite high concentrations of sugar. Avoid the frosted variety and be aware that muesli can also contain large amounts of nuts and dried fruit, which are high in calories and fats. A small serving is fine and the nuts have great nutritional value.

I prefer to make my own muesli with nuts but leaving out the dried fruit and adding some fresh berries instead. I also use porridge oats in the winter months and a couple of dried tablespoons go a long way.

Get into the habit of looking at labels. You should buy the cereals that show the lowest concentration of sugar. You can find this on the label in the part marked ‘Carbohydrate content of which sugars …’You will often find that there is more than a teaspoon of sugar – 6gms per serving.. that adds up over the day to overload you with sugar.

Bread usually contains yeast and sugar. You can buy yeast and sugar-free bread in supermarkets and health food shops. Remember to check the label. Use wholegrain bread, granary and avoid anything wrapped in plastic.

There are some starchy vegetables that should be eaten in moderation. Parsnips, a personal favourite of mine, are fairly high in calories but lower than potatoes. I often use them as a substitute for potatoes and serve them mashed with carrot or roasted, using a little bit of butter and seasoning.

Here is a list of the carbohydrates that I recommend.

Wholegrain rice, pasta, oats and store baked or home baked multigrain bread. You can also use corn or wholewheat tortillas and pitta breads etc. Occasionally you can enjoy fresh baked white bread made with strong flour. Avoid anything that is white flour and wrapped in plastic. Beans are carbohydrates but also contain proteins and nutrients such as B vitamins and essential minerals. I suggest using once or twice a week as a substitute for meat based proteins and casseroles with tomato, onions and mushrooms with herbs and spices is a delicious autumn or winter dish. You can also add to homemade soups.

Group three foods – Proteins

This is the protein group. I was a vegetarian for four years, but it didn’t really suit me. I did not give up meat on ethical grounds, but in order to reduce my fat intake to moderate levels. I now eat meat in moderation. I thoroughly enjoy a steak from time to time and feel that my program is easier to live with now that it includes meat. However, I prefer to eat fish three or four times a week, and I am very partial to salmon – 100 different ways!

Protein in animal form usually has a higher fat content. Remember, though, that we need some fats for our central nervous system and that they should be included in our diet in moderation. It is better to grill or oven-bake meat. If you are going to fry food or seal meat before roasting you only need a little oil in the pan. Research is indicating that you can use Extra Virgin Olive Oil as it is not as sensitive to the higher heat as once thought.. But fat is fat is fat. Yes, certain fats are better for you, such as olive oil and coconut oil., but they will all increase your weight if used excessively.

Proteins to choose from.

All lean cuts of beef, pork, lamb including offal such as liver if you enjoy. Once a week will give you a great nutritional boost. Poultry but duck can be fatty so eat once in a while and grill. Oily fish such as salmon, tuna, sardines, white fish which is high in protein and low on fats. Dairy such as milk, butter and cheese. Better to have a scrape of real butter than pile on commercially produced spreads. A stronger cheese can be used sparingly but will give great flavour. If you wish to use semi-skimmed or skimmed milk that is okay but to be honest I use full fat milk and just less of it. Eggs are very important for our health. Always eat well cooked and having one a day is not a problem. Once of the greatest myths about cholesterol was that eating eggs caused it!

If you are vegetarian then it is important that you include whole grains to obtain your B vitamins but you can also eat fermented soy products. Vegetables also contain protein including peas, sprouted beans, lentils, lima beans, corn, kale, broccoli, mushrooms, mange tout, artichokes, spinach etc.

Last but not least Fats….

We must not cut fats out of our diet – they have an essential role to play in our health and without fats and cholesterol our bodies will be open to infections, poor function in areas such as the brain, heart, reproductive system and our eyesight.

I use the 80/20 rule because of my past weight issues and 20% of my diet comprises healthy fats – sometimes I will have more because I am out for a meal etc but basically my everyday diet comprises mainly seasonal vegetables and fruit, wholegrain rice, fish, chicken, red meat once a week, eggs, olive oil, moderate dairy.

No one person’s diet is the same and you have to find the perfect balance for you and this includes your fat intake – as long as it is not harmful fats………..

Briefly, a quick look at the fats you are likely to encounter in your daily diet.

One fat to avoid all together, is not naturally occurring at all, and that is manufactured Trans Fats. Liquid oil is hydrogenated to extend its shelf life, but in the process Trans fatty acids are formed – found in most industrially produced foods including margarines -snacks such as microwave popcorn, cakes, biscuits, cookies, pies etc.

The other fat which in large quantities is not helpful in maintaining cholesterol levels is saturated fats – if there is too much in your diet it will raise your total Cholesterol as well as the LDL (low density lipoprotein – the kind that can block arteries). Mainly found in animal products but also some seafood. However, provided you are not eating the rich fat around a steak or roast every day, or eating a block of cheese three times a week, or a pound of butter on your spuds, you can enjoy what is very tasty component of your diet in moderation.

olives

The fats classified as healthy fats are Monounsaturated fats – which lower total cholesterol and at the same time lower LDL and increase HDL – this is contained in nuts, such as walnuts and olive oil.

Polyunsaturated fats also lower total cholesterol and LDL and these are found in salmon, soya, sunflower oils etc and have an important component; Omega-3 fatty acids. These can not only reduce your LDL and support HDL but are also very helpful in reducing blood pressure and the risk of developing blood clots. Even with people who have already suffered a heart attack including Omega-3 fatty acids in their diet reduces their risk of a fatal attack.

salmon

I love fish and it is very easy to include oily fish at least twice a week, although I do avoid farmed salmon and opt for frozen wild salmon (usually frozen). Some of the best for Omega-3 fatty acids are salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines and Albacore Tuna.

Oils and cooking.

Grilling food or steaming and then adding a drizzle of oil is healthier than frying

Use extra virgin olive oil for cooking (latest research indicates that this can be used at a higher temperature than first identified), and you can combine with some sunflower oil and a small amount of butter for a slightly different flavour. Recently coconut oil has come into focus as an oil to use in the kitchen and I have been using for over two years now and love the flavour it brings to salmon and other fish.

You should not burn any oil, but maintain a temperature that cooks your meat, chicken of fish evenly. I tend to brown the meat in the pan and then transfer to the oven or microwave to finish cooking

For salads, vegetables and on toast drizzle Extra Virgin Olive oil which has not been over processed – do not be tempted to use the light versions on offer as these have been industrialised. Just use the real stuff but a little less. You can now also buy Walnut oil and my favourite which is Avocado oil. Buy organic and whilst more expensive you do find a little goes a long way.

I hope you now see the amazing range of foods that you can enjoy whilst still losing weight. Of course you cannot eat platefuls of even healthy foods it you are not putting the effort in to work it off… more about that later.

©sally cronin Just Food for Health 1998 – 2022

 Next time – Putting your eating plan together to nourish your body as it loses weight.

A little bit about me nutritionally. .

About Sally Cronin

I am a qualified nutritional therapist with twenty-four years experience working with clients in Ireland and the UK as well as being a health consultant on radio in Spain.

Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 21 years ago, based on my own weight loss of 154lbs. My first clinic was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Since then I have written a men’s health manual, and anti-aging programme, articles for magazines, radio programmes and posts here on Smorgasbord.

You can buy my books from: Amazon US – and: Amazon UK – Follow me :Goodreads – Twitter: @sgc58 – Facebook: Sally Cronin – LinkedIn: Sally Cronin

Smorgasbord Health Column – Ancient Healing Therapies – Reflexology by Sally Cronin


A short series on some of the ancient healing therapies that you can still benefit from today.

I am reluctant to call the ancient healing skills ‘alternative therapies’ as that is an expression that was coined by the medical profession back in the dark ages…up to the present day…. to describe healing that has been used for thousands of years but is beyond their comprehension. This is not to say that all treatments today that are offered on the back of ancient healing are effective.

I had a number of therapy consultants working alongside me in my diet advisory centre in Ireland and they were all highly qualified and professional. However, most therapeutic practices are well regulated and I do advise that you not only check out the background to any practitioner you are going to see, but also check out any personal testimonials. I find word of mouth to be the most reliable.

To become an effective healer in any of the ancient practices you need to undergo stringent training and to have a broad knowledge of the human body. You also have to understand that even physical therapies, that require a hands on application, can have a profound effect on mental and emotional health. For example reflexology in the right hands, can result in a release of emotions, as well as alleviating pain and soreness in a particular region of the body.

The other aspect that it is interesting to note, is that some of the ancient therapies, such as acupuncture and reiki, are used on pets, and they can prove to be very effective. Since animals to not experience the placebo effect, it does go a long way to prove in my mind that the treatments are genuinely beneficial to humans and animals alike.

This is particularly interesting to consider when healing therapies such as reflexology are labeled pseudo-scientific and claim that there is no evidence that they work or benefit anyone health issues.

I am the first to tell anyone that they need to be diagnosed and treated for any serious condition by a qualified medical professional.

But I have worked with patients undergoing treatment for many different health issues, with diet and also stress related therapies that do not compromise the regimen that has been prescribed by their doctor. If you do decide to consult someone who will be using a hands on approach to the therapy then you should consult your doctor first.

Ancient Healing Therapies – Reflexology

What is reflexology?

Reflexology is a form of complementary medicine that was first practised over 5,000 years in China where it was used to correct energy fields in patients. There is evidence, in the form of wall art, that the Egyptians and Indians also used this form of healing in the same time period. The Incas are believed to have passed down their skill of reflexology to the North American Red Indians who used it extensively for healing and relaxation.

It really only came to prominence in the Western world in the last century when various physicians discovered that reflexology points when stimulated acted as a form of anaesthetic. A doctor in the U.S called Dr. William Fitzgerald developed these first points into vertical zones and connected them to specific organs and parts of the body. He wrote a book on Zone Therapy in the early 1900’s and was the forerunner of modern day reflexology therapy.

Later doctors added additional horizontal zones to the upper and underside of the feet and then to the hands. Other parts of the body such as the face and ears were explored as the connection between massaging certain points on the body and acupuncture became more apparent.

In the 1920’s a therapist called Eunice Ingham completed the chart of the feet and developed the method that today we call reflexology.

How does reflexology work?

As in acupuncture that I covered last week,there are a number of places on the body where pressure can be applied to benefit individual organs, systems and the structure of the body. This includes the hands and the ears but today I am going to focus on the feet which are the most common area of the body to be massaged.

Image: Alternative Therapy directory UK

In the feet there are reflex areas that correspond to all parts of the body and these areas are arranged in the form of a map on each foot. The right foot mainly corresponds to the right side of the body and the left foot to the left side with shared zones for central areas of the body. This enables therapists to be very specific about areas and conditions that require treatment. The important thing to remember with all natural therapies is that they work from the inside of the body to the outside of the body whereas conventional treatment tends to work from the outside in. In most cases this leads to the symptoms being treated and not the cause. Reflexology can treat the whole body internally and externally just by manipulating these specific pressure points.

If you imagine the image of the foot from above with the toes facing away from you can get a clearer picture of the reflexology map.

There are horizontal zones running across the centre line of the toes and these pressure points relate to the face, sinus, teeth, gums and jaw on the left foot and the neck and brain stem on the right foot. Above the zone in the nail bed of the big toe is the zone for the head and brain and under the zone at the base of the toe is the zone for the neck.

Another horizontal band runs across the foot just slightly below the toes and this relates to the tops of the shoulders. Half way up the foot is a zone that can be massaged to relieve upper back problems and the zone around the base of the ankle controls the lymph glands, fallopian tubes and the groin area.

Along each side of the foot are smaller zones with specific roles in therapy. Along the outside edge of the left foot are the zones for the arm, lungs, chest and breast areas, elbow, waistline, knee and leg and lower back. Along the inside edge of the left and right feet are zones for the spine and the bladder.

On the bottom of the feet.

On the bottom of both feet you will find specific zones of varying sizes that are massaged to provide therapy for other parts and organs. On the underside of the left foot are the zones for shoulder, lungs, upper chest and back, diaphragm, gall bladder, ascending colon. Just under the last two toes is the zone for the inner ear. The big toe has a zone for the head and brain as well as one for the pituitary gland.

The underside of the right foot contains zones for the thyroid gland, eye, sinus, neck, ear, arm, stomach, spleen, transverse and descending colon and the small intestine.

Both feet share zones on the inside edge and centre which relate to the heart, solar plexus, liver, adrenal gland, pancreas, kidneys, spine, bladder, sciatic nerve and the lower back.

As in acupuncture the gentle manipulation of certain pressure points on the feet releases blocked channels in the body allowing healing to take place.

What happens during a reflexology treatment?

Your therapist should take a full medical history before beginning to treat you. You will then sit in a comfortable position with bare feet.

All the zones on the feet will be massaged usually using the side and end of the thumb to apply firm pressure. If there is a particular part of the body that is affected by pain or discomfort this will often be reflected in the specific zone for that area on the foot. A feeling of tenderness will be experienced that can ease with continued massage. The process should not be in any way uncomfortable and in fact many people find it very relaxing.

What health conditions might reflexology help?

As with any alternative therapy, despite often having thousands of years of history, you have to be very careful about claiming that it works as a cure. Many patients find relief from stress, depression, fatigue, spinal problems, indigestion, Irritable bowel syndrome, hormone imbalance and sinusitis. It is also used for specific muscle and joint pain in conjunction with other complementary therapies.

Are there any side effects resulting from a reflexology treatment?

It depends on the extent of the original problem but there may be slight detox side effects such as mild headaches, diarrhoea, and possible congestion as the body tries to rid itself of toxins that have been released. It is a good idea to combine reflexology with a detox programme along the lines of last month’s plan combined with additional fluids. You might also experience some emotional side-effects and certainly if you have been under stress you might find yourself feeling either a little weepy. You should certainly feel relaxed.

Reflexology and pets.

Sam enjoyed both reflexology and reiki healing which I will cover in another post. He would actively ask for a massage, not just on his tummy as many dogs do but he would come and sit with his back to me until he was touching my knees… I would then massage the edges of his ears (like in humans probably relating to certain parts of his body ) and then his neck gently and then down across the tops of his front legs and then down his spine…

He would occasionally lift his paw and I would massage the pads of his foot and lightly inbetween the toes..He would sit perfectly still for 10 minutes or so before getting up, stretching and moving off to go to sleep.

Thanks for dropping in today and hope you have found the post interesting.. Sally

©Sally Cronin Just Food for Health 1998- 2022

A little bit about me nutritionally. .

About Sally Cronin

I am a qualified nutritional therapist with twenty-four years experience working with clients in Ireland and the UK as well as being a health consultant on radio in Spain.

Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 21 years ago, based on my own weight loss of 154lbs. My first clinic was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Since then I have written a men’s health manual, and anti-aging programme, articles for magazines, radio programmes and posts here on Smorgasbord.

You can buy my books from: Amazon US – and: Amazon UK – Follow me :Goodreads – Twitter: @sgc58 – Facebook: Sally Cronin – LinkedIn: Sally Cronin

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – 12th – 18th September 2022 – Tapestry, Chart Hits 2003,Water Devining, Book Reviews, Blogger Stars, Food A-Z, Health and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed this week on Smorgasbord.

A mixed week for us with sun and rain and I took advantage of the sunshine to empty and refill some of the flower pots with autumn bloomers. I also took some photographs of our trees whilst they still have leaves on them. They will be useful when we put together the images when the house goes on the market, likely mid to late October when most of the leaves will be gone. At least prospective buyers will be able to see what it can look like.

I have also picked up my tapestry again after a break of some years where blogging and writing seemed to fill most of the waking hours of the day. I have eight full size canvases around the house and some smaller ones going back 30 years to when we lived in London and I gave up smoking. I needed something to keep my fingers busy when watching television so began the first one in 1992. I have two unfinished pieces, one of which is a mother elephant and her calf which is about a metre square which is a major project. I am hoping the mild weather continues for a little while longer as I am enjoying sitting in the garden and sewing.  Here are two of my full size pieces including my first effort Van Gogh’s sunflowers. Blogging and writing are still high on my priority list but I had forgotten the pleasure working with these pieces brought me.

Contributor News this week.

William Price King joined me for The Breakfast Show for the second part of chart hits from 2003 and the finale of the series on Pavarotti. Coming up in a few weeks we step back in time back to the 40s and 50s for the rest of the year. Get your dancing shoes ready. You can also find William Blog– IMPROVISATIONWilliam Price King on Tumblr

Debby Gies​ will be here tomorrow morning with her next post in her Spiritual Awareness series… and over on her own blog there is a lovely tribute to her brother-in-law who sadly passed away this week, her monthly writer’s tips packed with useful information and ideas and her Sunday Book Review for Upon Departure by John Roedel. Follow the link to Debby’s posts D.G. Kaye

Carol Taylor was here on Wednesday with her  A-Z of food with the letter ‘G’… on her own blog she welcomed us to September with her Monday Musings, a recipe for eggy bread with crumpets, spinach, feta cheese, thyme and mushrooms, a review of aromatic leaves including Sassafras and Nasturtium Leaves and Saturday Snippets where she explore’s the word ‘Bread’. Head over to enjoy Carol’s Weekly Round Up

Thank you too for all your visits, comments and shares during the week. As always very much appreciated…♥

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 2003 Part Two – Kid Rock featuring Sheryl Crow, Evanescence, Annie Lennox, Celine Dion

Music Legends – #Classical – Luciano Pavarotti – The Finale

Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘G’ for Ginger, Garlic, Guacamole, Goosefat and Gribige…

Milestones Along the Way – #Ireland #1930s – The Yards of Waterford by Geoff Cronin

Milestones Along the Way – #Ireland #1930s – Divine Guidance by Geoff Cronin

Podcast – #Poetry and #Flash – A Celebration and Tramp’s Heartbreak by Sally Cronin

Creatures, Wild Animals, Bird, Dove, Measurement

Size Matters: The Sequel – #Morbid Obesity – #Weightloss – How much should you weigh? by Sally Cronin

Smorgasbord Health Column – Ancient Healing Therapies – Acupuncture by Sally Cronin

#Fantasy – The Necromancer’s Daughter by D.Wallace Peach

– #Poetry – A Specialist At The Recycled Heart (Free Verse Poetry) by Frank Prem

September 12th 2022 – #Bullying Pete Springer, #Memories Robbie Cheadle and Judith Barrow, #Luck Marcia Meara, #Reviews Sandra Cox, #Grief D.G. Kaye

#Historical Andrew Joyce, #Historical Paulette Mahurin

Close up of Big Red Kitty at rest

#Feralcats Big Red Kitty Callie by Nikki Frie

 

#Shortstory #Snowstorm #Outage by D.L. Finn

#History – Nancy and the “Wilson Schoolbus” by Joy Neal Kidney

#Legohouses #Denbies by Sue Wickstead

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – ATM’s and Spaghetti

Irish Weather The Musical with International guests presented by I.V.E Mildew… AKA Herself.

 

Thanks very much for dropping in today and I hope you will join me again next week… Sally.

Smorgasbord Health Column – Size Matters: The Sequel – #Morbid Obesity – #Weightloss – How much should you weigh? by Sally Cronin


This is the updated and fifth edition of Size Matters and I had intended to release in 2021 for the 25th anniversary of my initial weight loss. However, with everything else going on in the world it did not seem appropriate to celebrate when people’s minds were fixed on survival in lockdown. Although this serialisation ontains much of the original material in relation to my own personal story, the programme has evolved over the last 25 years.

Although I studied nutritional therapy back in the mid-1990s, I have continued my studies and developed new programmes for healthy eating that are tailor made for the individual rather than a one size fits all. I still believe that the key elements of this basic weight loss programme I will share with you in this updated version works. Even when I work with clients who have arthritis or diabetes, I still approach their programmes from the three dimensions that I outline in this book.

Last week I shared the planning needed to get a weight loss project up and running and sustained over the long term.

You can read the previous post: HERE

Our physical approach, our mental attitude and our emotions are all factors in how we overcome disease and obesity, and should all be addressed when looking for the right programme that will work for each individual.

Weightloss – How much should you weigh? 

Creatures, Wild Animals, Bird, Dove, Measurement

With any project plan you need to have a start point and and end point…measurement is the key to identify progress and also to create significant events that warrant celebration.

How much do you weigh now?

And how much should you weigh to be healthy?

Where do you start?

It is important to have a start point when you are planning to lose weight so that you have a road map to follow, with a destination that is attainable.

I have often heard clients say ‘I would just love to lose 10 kilos or 2 stone or 10lbs’.

This is based not necessarily on the actual weight they need to lose but what they consider to be an acceptably achievable goal.

To be honest you need to be a little more specific than this. You may only need to lose 7lbs or 5 kilos or you may need to lose more to reach a healthy weight for your age and activity level.

There are two common methods of measuring your weight with regard to health and that is a straightforward weight/height/sex comparison and BMI or Body Mass Index. I believe that it is easier to manage and track your actual weight rather than focus on just BMI – certainly if you are a body builder and fit, determining your health with BMI is not relevant.

Most ideal weight profiles are derived from insurance company statistical tables. These tables however were produced nearly 60 years ago when physically we were shorter and our diet following the war years was still restricted for many people. For example here is one Insurance company guide which was devised in 1943 and revised in 1983: metlife

I don’t believe that these tables are appropriate today, and if you take the ideal weights in that table and treat it as the minimum weight for your height then I believe that it is more realistic for this generation.

It is a guideline only and the important factors are the indicators of how healthy you are internally as well as externally.

Of greater importance to me, are your blood pressure, unhealthy cholesterol and blood sugar levels.

And if you need to lose more than two or three stone – 42lbs I would suggest that you get those measured before you start. In the UK you can pop into certain pharmacies and they will do the checks for you. It will also give you another measurement during the weight loss process to determine your progress not just with weight but general health and fitness.

I also do not believe in starving the body into submission – when I was studying to correct my own weight issues, I realised that despite being 24 stone I was suffering from malnutrition.

Lots of calories but few nutrients in my diet – hence mal–nourished.

You have no idea how funny most of my overweight clients find that notion. You will often hear the expression “starvation syndrome” which is where the body loses weight under famine conditions (crash diet) and then rebounds with extra weight when there is a time of harvest (when you start to eat normally again) I have always preferred to call this “nutritional deficiency syndrome” .

Some of the other important questions also need to be taken into account. During your weight loss do you have plenty of energy and is your immune system functioning efficiently? Losing weight successfully involves a number of other factors apart from the food you eat, including exercise, willpower and your emotional involvement.

However, we do need that start point and I have a basic ready reckoner that you can adapt for your own physical build. I have used this for years for both myself and my clients and I have found it the easiest to combine both frame size and weight.

Working it out

There are a number of sites that will work out your frame size for you – it involves your wrist measurement and your height. Take your wrist measurement with a tape measure and plug in with your height. So for example..

I am 5ft 11inches and my wrist measures 6.5 inches which gives me a medium body frame.

Women:

Height under 5’2″

Small = wrist size less than 5.5″
Medium = wrist size 5.5″ to 5.75″
Large = wrist size over 5.75″

Height 5’2″ to 5′ 5″

Small = wrist size less than 6″
Medium = wrist size 6″ to 6.25″
Large = wrist size over 6.25″

Height over 5′ 5″

Small = wrist size less than 6.25″
Medium = wrist size 6.25″ to 6.5″
Large = wrist size over 6.5″

Men:

Height over 5′ 5″

Small = wrist size 5.5″ to 6.5″
Medium = wrist size 6.5″ to 7.5″
Large = wrist size over 7.5″

Source: Medline Plus

Working out your weight.

For medium framed women as the average.

As a base, use 100lbs up to five foot and then 6lbs for every inch over that height. Modify by 5% either way if you have a light frame or heavy frame.

For medium framed men

As a base, use 106lbs up to five foot and then 7lbs for every inch over that height. Modify either way by 5% if you have a light frame or heavy frame.

Examples

A woman who is a heavy frame and 5’ 6” would have an optimal weight of:

100lbs + (6lbs for every inch over 5ft) 36lbs = 136lbs – Add 5% for heavy frame = 6.8lbs

This gives an optimum weight of 142.8lbs, 10stone 2lbs or 67.7Kilos

A light framed man of 5’ 10” would have an optimum weight of:

106lbs + (7lbs for every inch over 5ft) 70lbs = 176lbs – Subtract 5% for light frame = 9lbs

This gives an optimum weight of 167lbs, 11stone 13lbs or 75.9Kilos.

To be honest, I have met people who are fantastically healthy, fit and full of energy who are a stone or even heavier. But, there is no doubt that if we are talking about a healthy weight, fit and at less risk of the health problems including hip and knee problems, being nearer the optimum weight is best.

Step one –make a note of your weight tomorrow morning when you get up and deduct your optimum weight according to your frame size.

If you need to lose between 7lbs – 14lbs– then you need to set a target of 14 weeks. You are not going to get a quick water release as soon as you start so losing 1lb a week is both healthy and reasonable. You may find that there is just a minor adjustment needed to your daily diet and activity levels to achieve this comfortably.

If you need to lose between 14lbs and 42lbsyou are going to have to both make adjustments to the types of food that you are currently consuming (sugars, processed foods) and move your activity level into higher gear. You are looking at around 14 -30 weeks for the best results without the danger of regaining the weight.

If you are between 42lbs and 84lbs overweight – you are looking at between 30 and 52 weeks to lose the weight, reduce the risk of loose skin that can be left, and to develop an activity programme gradually that will retrain your muscles and build stamina. If you are on medication for BP etc. then please consult your doctor.

If you need to lose more than 84lbs then you should be consulting with your doctor in regard to your general health. I am sure that they will support any health eating programme that involves eating natural, unprocessed foods but since you may have other health issues and medication, please consult them first. Be aware that losing weight healthily could take between 52 and 78 weeks.

However much weight you need to lose, you still need to mentally and emotionally prepare for the journey ahead. We all start out with good intentions but if we do not have a clear goal, measurements along the way and a set routine we all fall by the wayside.

©sally cronin Just Food for Health 1998 – 2022

Next time -you will not believe all the amazing foods you can eat to keep your healthy as you lose weight and your shopping list is next week..

A little bit about me nutritionally. .

About Sally Cronin

I am a qualified nutritional therapist with twenty-four years experience working with clients in Ireland and the UK as well as being a health consultant on radio in Spain.

Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 21 years ago, based on my own weight loss of 154lbs. My first clinic was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Since then I have written a men’s health manual, and anti-aging programme, articles for magazines, radio programmes and posts here on Smorgasbord.

You can buy my books from: Amazon US – and: Amazon UK – Follow me :Goodreads – Twitter: @sgc58 – Facebook: Sally Cronin – LinkedIn: Sally Cronin

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Carol Taylor’s – Culinary A – Z Rewind – ‘G’ for Ginger, Garlic, Guacamole, Goosefat and Gribige…


Welcome to a repeat of the series from Carol Taylor, the wonderful Culinary A – Z and a reminder, not only of the amazing variety of food we have available to us today from around the world, but delicious recipes to showcase them. Carol also introduces to cooking methods and kitchen equipment that assist in creating meals for all occasions.

Welcome once again to Carols Cooking Column and today in my culinary trawl we have the letter G.

Let’s start with two ingredients which not only do I grow but use very frequently in fact almost daily I would say…

Ginger and Galangal are both used frequently in Thai cuisine. The difference visually is quite apparent Galangal has that lovely pinkish hue when it is freshly dug up.

Ginger is a soft brown colour a comparison could be the peacock and the peahen…in my mind…haha

Galangal or as it is also known Thai ginger is used in many dishes …it can only be sliced it does not grate well it is also used in the famous Tom Yum Soup

Ginger you can grate or dice finely, it is used in fish dishes here in Thailand or with Scallops it is a lovely thing.

Both are members of the rhizome family…turmeric and cardamom both being relatives of ginger which has a softer taste than the citrusy Galangal.

Ginger is softly sweet and slightly spicy and medicinally it has many benefits. Ginger tea can aid digestion and is a lovely drink.

Ginger Beer… my mum used to make it and I have memories of the corks popping out while it was fermenting in her pantry. She used to feed the root and then pass half on to a friend a bit like we pass on our sough dough or kombucha. For so long I kept saying I am going to start a ginger beer plant as I have such happy memories and love a drink of ginger beer.I am now the proud owner of one and love it…

The true Ginger Beer Plant dates back to around the 1700’s and is not actually a plant at all, instead it is a living organism. This organism forms a gelatinous cluster which moves about within its jar naturally, and used correctly can allow you to make a lifetime’s supply of authentic, naturally fizzy alcoholic Ginger Beer that used to be commonplace in most UK households.

Easy to make just follow the instructions below…

  1. Dice a tablespoon of fresh ginger root into small cubes and place this into a sterilised jam jar three quarters full of de-chlorinated or mineral water.
  2. Add two teaspoons of white sugar.
  3. Cover the top of the jar with some muslin to allow air flow but protect from debris or insects falling into the jar.
  4. Leave the jar in an exposed place at room temperature, e.g. a kitchen shelf.
  5. Every day for about a week add two teaspoons of sugar and two teaspoons of fresh diced ginger root.
  6. If after one week the mixture is frothy with a pleasant odour it is ready to use. If it is mouldy discard it and start at the beginning again.

Garlic

Garlic has been used for several thousands of years a common seasoning used by most people it is also hailed as having numerous health benefits.

Garlic one of my most purchased foods and one I use daily it is also lovely pickled… If you coat the cloves with olive oil and roast them in the oven until they are soft they can then be squeezed and made into a dip.

The Koreans heat the heads of garlic for several weeks and the sweet and syrupy result is sold as black garlic.

Now who doesn’t love garlic bread and I claim to make the best garlic bread… Garlic toast, bruschetta, crostini all made with garlic are just wonderful…

Garlic powder has a different taste from fresh garlic and if used as a substitute for fresh garlic 1/8 tsp. is eqivalent to approx 1 clove of garlic.

The garlic leaves are used in cooking here and in many parts of Asia they are cut, cleaned and then stir fried with eggs,fish, meat or vegetables.

Gribiche… a sauce originating in France made with hardboiled eggs and capers but is it a sauce? A vinaigrette , a mayonnaise or a condiment it seems to get labelled around the world of cuisine as any of those and has evolved over the years as many recipes have …I think I much prefer the original.

Guacamole…first developed by the Aztecs it is a popular dish of Mexican origins and also made all over world now as an appetiser or side to spicy dishes.

Ingredients:

• I avocado
• 1 ripe tomato
• 1 finely chopped shallot or green onion…I prefer shallots
• I birds eye chilli finely chopped
• 1 tbsp of fresh coriander
• Salt and black pepper for seasoning
• Lime juice

Let’s Cook!

  1. Peel and roughly chop the avocado
  2. Stir in the chopped onion, chilli, tomatoes and the coriander.
  3. Season to taste with salt, black pepper and a generous squeeze of lime juice.
  4. Cover bowl with cling film and chill before chill before serving.

As pictured we love ours chunky rather than smooth but it is all a matter of choice…

Goosefat… Make for the best roast potatoes and it also has a high smoke point. It has also been known as that “old white magic” and used for generations in Europe. Once so prized in France only the aristocracy had permission to eat it… milder than duck fat it has a distinct flavour and adds a quality of any of your dishes very versatile you can confit, sauté, bake, roast, baste, pan fry, deep fry and stew and is still widely used in French cuisine.

Gratin… Who doesn’t love a cauliflower cheese or other vegetables coated in a cheese sauce? The meaning is a dish tipped with lightly browned bread crumbs or cheese.

Garam Masala… I make all my own spices and this is no exception easy to make and it means spices rotate quicker so they are always fresher which one reason why I make my own spice mixes and also it is cost effective and they contain no fillers and no nasties like store bought mixes.

Some ask the question is it the same as curry powder? The answer no…Curry powder contains many of the same ingredients for example fenugreek and cumin along with other spices however garam masala consists entirely of pungent spices and has a stronger flavour.

Ingredients:

• 2 tbsp coriander seeds
• 2 tbsp cumin seeds
• 4 whole cloves
• 6 cardamon pods green
• 2 bay leaves
• 2 inch piece of cinnamon
• 1 tsp black peppercorns
• 1 tbsp fennel seeds
• 1 piece of mace.

Let’s Cook!

  1. Dry roast all your spices individually until warm and fragrant.
  2. Leave to cool completely and then grind to a fine powder …I have a little coffee grinder which I use to grind my spices and it works really well prior to that I used a pestle and mortar which is hard work but brilliant as an arm toner.
  3. Store in an airtight container and use within 3 months as the spice will start to lose its potency …If you use a lot of gamma masala then just double or treble the quantities.

Green Papaya… One of my favourites and used all the time here to make Som Tam ( Papaya Salad) I also use them to make mango chutney as although I love Thai food I also love Indian food .

It is a very common sight here when taking a walk as most gardens have their own papaya trees again it is a staple of the Thai diet.

Som tam is also one of our favourite brunches and eaten at least twice a week if not more even little Lily loves now. This one pictured is made with crab

I hope you have enjoyed reading the letter G…Thank to everyone who has commented and loves this series as much as I have enjoyed researching and writing it…Thank you also to Sally for re running my Culinary Alphabet while I slave away in my kitchen and boy is it hot…haha…testing and re testing recipes for my cookbook.

Thank you for reading I hope you have enjoyed this little trip through the Culinary alphabet…Until next time when it will be the letter H.

About Carol Taylor

Enjoying life in The Land Of Smiles I am having so much fun researching, finding new, authentic recipes both Thai and International to share with you. New recipes gleaned from those who I have met on my travels or are just passing through and stopped for a while. I hope you enjoy them.

I love shopping at the local markets, finding fresh, natural ingredients, new strange fruits and vegetables ones I have never seen or cooked with. I am generally the only European person and attract much attention and I love to try what I am offered and when I smile and say Aroy or Saab as it is here in the north I am met with much smiling.

Some of my recipes may not be in line with traditional ingredients and methods of cooking but are recipes I know and have become to love and maybe if you dare to try you will too. You will always get more than just a recipe from me as I love to research and find out what other properties the ingredients I use have to improve our health and wellbeing.

Exciting for me hence the title of my blog, Retired No One Told Me! I am having a wonderful ride and don’t want to get off, so if you wish to follow me on my adventures, then welcome! I hope you enjoy the ride also and if it encourages you to take a step into the unknown or untried, you know you want to…….Then, I will be happy!

Carol is a contributor to the Phuket Island Writers Anthology: Amazon US

Connect to Carol – Blog: Carol Cooks 2 – Twitter: @CarolCooksTwo – Facebook: Carol Taylor

 

My thanks to Carol for creating this wonderful series and we hope that you have enjoyed. As always we are delighted to receive your feedback and if you could share that would be great.. thanks Sally.