Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Summer 2020- Pot Luck – Poetry Friday ~ Wild Fire by Vashti Quiroz-Vega


To finish off this current series of posts from your archives, author Vashti Quiroz-Vega share two posts that I am sure you will find as interesting as I did.

For this second post I have chosen one from January of this year which has recent relevance as the fires in California have been another reminder of the power of nature.

Poetry Friday ~ Wild Fire

Hi, everyone! Welcome.

Since September, 17.9 million acres of Australia have burned in one of the country’s worst fire seasons on record. That’s an area larger than West Virginia, and more than eight times the area that burned in California in 2018, the state’s most destructive year for wildfires.

The fires have now killed at least 27 people and destroyed almost 2,000 homes. The blazes turned skies orange and made breathing the air in Sydney as bad as smoking 37 cigarettes. Those are just the impacts on people. The destruction of the country’s land and biodiversity is harder to fathom. An estimated 1 billion animals have been lost, and scientists fear long-term damage to many sensitive ecosystems.

Though rain brought firefighters a slight reprieve Wednesday, the AP reports that hot and windy conditions that will keep the fires burning are expected to return later this week.

It’s a disaster that’s particularly ominous: In a warming world, extreme fire events like this one will only grow more likely to occur. – Australia Fires: 7 Things Everyone Should Know About The Brushfire Disaster.

Photograph by Cris Saur @crisaur

What is happening in Australia right now is devastating. I feel terrible for the families that have lost loved ones and are suffering through this hellish brushfire disaster. The number of animals that have perished in the fire is perturbing. 1 Billion animals dead! The firefighters that are putting their lives at risk every day battling the flames are amazing. It is easy to feel helpless, especially if you live on the other side of the planet, but there are things we could do to help.

  • If you’re in Australia, Givit has a list of specific items needed by people and organizations affected by the bushfires.
  • People with emergency response training can sign up to volunteer in Queensland.
  • The World Wildlife Fund is collecting donations to restore habitats for koalas impacted by the fires.
  • You can donate to the Australian Red Cross’s fire recovery and relief fund.
  • You can also donate directly to the New South Wales Rural Fire Service, , the  Country Fire Service Foundation in South Australia, and the  Country Fire Authority in Victoria.

Photograph by Mark Galer @markgaler

Colleen’s 2020 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 159, #Poet’sChoice

I chose to share this beautiful and heart-wrenching poem by Philip Salom dedicated to the men and women who fight these fires. Below is part one of the poem. You can read the rest of it here.

Bushfire

As if going into battle, the knapsack 
full on my shoulders, its pipe and nozzle
slung up like a rifle.
We fought along the river, seeing shrubs
explode, riddled with fire,
eerie sounds of trees shrieking
like things alive, feral, flames like faces
spilling down into the ferns.
We staggered, sick with the hammering heat,
dousing endless flames that slammed at us
 like nightmares, sullen ghosts
groping at our limbs. We plunged
into that day's red thunder, 
subsumed like suiciders who stare into
the rifle, gulp the flame. Individuals
meandering in something huge.
We choked in smoking semi-darkness,
shadows through the lead-coloured
air of limbo.

Now the aching blistering weight
of the knapsack pulling my shoulders.
Exhaustion worries the scorched end
of some unity: thought and action
fused into one. Sagging now,
heavier than the slopping drums
behind the tractors coming in.
We see the new men walking in
and seem to meet our earlier selves
but are more certain and more tired.
I, older than my youth, seeing these men
as if they were children.

Photograph by Liam Pozz @liampozz

Thanks to Vashti for letting me share – Thanks for the visit, and feel free to leave your thoughts and opinions in the comment section below.  

About Vashti Quiroz -Vega

Vashti Quiroz-Vega is a writer of Fantasy, Horror, and Thriller. Since she was a kid she’s always had a passion for writing and telling stories. It has always been easier for her to express her thoughts on paper.

She enjoys reading almost as much as she loves to write. Some of her favorite authors are Stephen King, Michael Crichton, Anne Rice, J.R.R. Tolkien, J.K. Rowling and George R. R. Martin.

She enjoys making people feel an array of emotions with her writing. She likes her audience to laugh one moment, cry the next and clench their jaws after that.

When she isn’t building extraordinary worlds and fleshing out fascinating characters, she enjoys spending time with her husband JC and her Pomeranian Scribbles who is also her writing buddy.

Books by Vashti Quiroz Vega

 

One of the recent reviews for Fall of Lilith

Amazon Reader 4.0 out of 5 stars An immersive fantasy with a new take on an old story  Reviewed in the United States on May 7, 2020

I really enjoyed this immersive fantasy read. It’s based on the fall of the angels from the Old Testament, but it brings an all-new spin to the story with the role of Lilith. I was engaged by all the details of this version of Heaven, and the progression of Lilith from a relatively harmless girl to a tragic anti-hero is interesting to watch. I do wish she had a little bit more goodness in her because that would’ve made her more sympathetic as a main character. Yet I also understand the restraints of telling a story like this, in which there is clear good and evil. After the fall of the angels, the story takes us to earth, where the angels are banished. Once again, I was pleased at the combination of both familiar and unexpected elements. Overall, well written and imaginative!

Vashti Quiroz- Vega, Buy:Amazon US – and : Amazon UK –  Follow Vashti : Goodreads – website:Vashti – WordPress – Twitter: @VashtiQV

 

Thanks for dropping by and Vashti would love your feedback.. thanks  Sally.

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Summer 2020- Pot Luck- Book Reviews by Vashti Quiroz-Vega


To finish off this current series of posts from your archives, author Vashti Quiroz-Vega share two posts that I am sure you will enjoy.

For this first post I have chosen one from March of this year which has several reviews for books that look very interesting.

New Book Reviews: The One Discovered by Yvette Calleiro, Journey to the Rainbow’s End by Forrest Stepnowski, and The Ex Chronicles by Maura Beth Brennan

Hello, everyone! I hope you are all safe and healthy.

“There is no place like home.”

~L. Frank Baum

The best thing we could do right now to slow the spread of the coronavirus is to stay home. Of course, that’s not possible for everyone, but if you can work from home you should. Self isolation has worked well for other countries and in past pandemics. Practice social distancing even if you’re young and healthy because although your chances of dying from COVID– 19 is low you could still spread the disease to people that are vulnerable and could die from it.

I’d like to thank all the people in the medical field, including my brother Ralph, who’s at the front lines every day, and my cousins Lissette, Ray, Miguel, Leo, and Sonya. You’re putting yourselves at risk on a daily basis to help those in need. Thank you.

Changing the subject, I’ve been doing a lot of reading since I sent my manuscript to my editor. Today, I’d like to share three of the books I’ve read so far and my reviews. I posted the reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, and although they are already showing on Goodreads, Amazon has yet to make all three reviews available.

Book Reviews: Click on the images to purchase on Amazon

The One Discovered by Yvette Calleiro

I don’t read a lot of young-adult fantasy novels, but this one came highly recommended, and the book cover enticed me. This is the first book in the Chronicles Of The Diasodz series.

Sofia is a seventeen-year-old girl in her last year of high school. Up until this point, she’s lived an ordinary life as the daughter of Liana, a single mom and girlfriend to lifelong friend Rafe. One night, she has an extraordinary dream in which she meets a handsome boy named Ar’ch. Her life takes a bizarre turn when she goes to work and comes across Ar’ch in real life.

Sofia learns that she is far more than she ever thought she could be, and that an entire world’s existence depends on her. She has a decision to make, but how can she leave her home and everyone she loves behind?

How does a teenage girl choose between her boyfriend, who’s been her best friend since childhood, and a handsome boy who makes her feel things she’s never felt before?

The story was slow-paced at first, but soon picked up. Overall, it had a good flow and kept me engaged. The characters were well developed and relatable, especially Sofia, Angel, and Rafe. The final chapters are captivating and full of action until the end.

I recommend this book to readers who enjoy a young-adult fantasy with a love triangle, excellent characters, world building, action, and drama. I look forward to reading the second book in the series, The One Enlightened.

***
The Ex Chronicles by Maura Beth Brennan

“The Ex Chronicles” is a humorous short story about a couple named Angie and Bryce.

When Angie met Bryce, she thought she had found Mr. Right. She fell madly in love with him, only to find out he was cheating on her.

Believing their relationship was worth fighting for, Angie designs a plan to confront her boyfriend and the other woman. All the while, old black-and-white movies played in her head, and she imagined herself as one of the heroines starring in the movies, so she figured everything would turn out as she planned.

Unfortunately, things did not play out as Angie had hoped, and her antics will have you rolling with laughter.

I enjoyed author Maura Beth Brennan’s sense of humor and writing style. I recommend this quick and fun read to anyone who’s been in a bad relationship and only has a moment to spare.

***
Journey to the Rainbow’s End by Forrest Stepnowski

Journey to the Rainbow’s End begins with a varied collection of freestyle poems, which are both beautiful and heartfelt. About halfway through the book, author Forrest Stepnowski gives us a short, insightful account (fictionalized memoir) of his journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance.

Robert grew up in a religious home where being gay was not an option. He was taught that homosexuality was a sin and punishable by God. From an early age, he struggled with whom he was and hungered for love, acceptance, and compassion—mostly from himself.

In his early teens, Robert felt an attraction to other boys, but he was conflicted and confused due to his homophobic religious teachings. He suffered many terrible experiences in his developmental years, including a suicide attempt and the death of a close friend.

Robert experienced sex, and like a bird released from its cage, he began a reckless way of life with multiple lovers. When he learned that a good friend was diagnosed with AIDS and committed suicide, Robert was forced to change his ways.

I enjoyed how the author combined his poetry with the narrating of his story because it gave me a better perspective. In the end, despite the difficulties endured by Robert, he managed to find his way to self-acceptance.

Overall, this book is about learning to accept who you are and adds another dimension to the LGBT story, which is a human story. I was touched by this book because the author bravely bared his soul to inspire others who may be walking the same path.

The story and poems were fabulous, but there were a few poems that stood out for me and moved me in some way.

“I Am Not The One” – I loved this line: “I am worth more than my weight in diamonds and gold.”

“Freeze” – I got goose bumps reading this one, and I loved the ending.

“That’s Gay” – Powerful and relatable, even to straight people.

“The Touch of Your Skin” – HOT

“The Song of Ever Changing Fairytales” – Who wouldn’t relate?

If you enjoy beautiful poetry from the heart and riveting short stories, this book is for you.

reading, book reviews, Vashti Quiroz Vega, Vashti Q, author, books, stay at home, read more

“The ultimate luxury is being able to relax and enjoy your home.”

~Jeff Lincoln

Thanks to Vashti for letting me share…I hope you enjoyed the post. Thanks for the visit, and feel free to leave your thoughts and opinions in the comment section below.  

About Vashti Quiroz -Vega

Vashti Quiroz-Vega is a writer of Fantasy, Horror, and Thriller. Since she was a kid she’s always had a passion for writing and telling stories. It has always been easier for her to express her thoughts on paper.

She enjoys reading almost as much as she loves to write. Some of her favorite authors are Stephen King, Michael Crichton, Anne Rice, J.R.R. Tolkien, J.K. Rowling and George R. R. Martin.

She enjoys making people feel an array of emotions with her writing. She likes her audience to laugh one moment, cry the next and clench their jaws after that.

When she isn’t building extraordinary worlds and fleshing out fascinating characters, she enjoys spending time with her husband JC and her Pomeranian Scribbles who is also her writing buddy.

Books by Vashti Quiroz Vega

 

One of the recent reviews for Fall of Lilith

Amazon Reader 4.0 out of 5 stars An immersive fantasy with a new take on an old story  Reviewed in the United States on May 7, 2020

I really enjoyed this immersive fantasy read. It’s based on the fall of the angels from the Old Testament, but it brings an all-new spin to the story with the role of Lilith. I was engaged by all the details of this version of Heaven, and the progression of Lilith from a relatively harmless girl to a tragic anti-hero is interesting to watch. I do wish she had a little bit more goodness in her because that would’ve made her more sympathetic as a main character. Yet I also understand the restraints of telling a story like this, in which there is clear good and evil. After the fall of the angels, the story takes us to earth, where the angels are banished. Once again, I was pleased at the combination of both familiar and unexpected elements. Overall, well written and imaginative!

Vashti Quiroz- Vega, Buy:Amazon US – and : Amazon UK –  Follow Vashti : Goodreads – website:Vashti – WordPress – Twitter: @VashtiQV

 

Thanks for dropping by and Vashti would love your feedback.. thanks  Sally.

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Summer 2020- Pot Luck- #FlashFiction – Friday Flash Fiction 575 – Bonfire by Janet Gogerty


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives… and I will be picking two posts from the blogs of those participating from the first six months of 2020. If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

This is the second post from author Janet Gogerty and this week I have selected a flash fiction piece from January 2020 when Brexit was looming and we thought that was all we had to worry about.. until March came rollicking in….

Friday Flash Fiction 575 – Bonfire by Janet Gogerty

I walked down the hill to Tuckton Village and passed boarded up shops; as I rounded the bend I saw the guards at the bridge over the River Stour turning people away; it was true, we still had twelve hours before we left the European Union, but Remainer movement was restricted more each day. There was still a chance; I slipped past the ruins of Tuckton Tea Gardens and joined a straggle of people wandering aimlessly, their eyes darting to the river. One man suddenly dashed to an empty boat, struggling to untie the mooring, a shot rang out and the rest of us dived for cover. Round the bend we kept to the trees, it was quiet, we all had the same goal.

‘Fifteen pounds each, this is my last trip!’ whispered the Wick ferryman.

I was the last to squeeze on board, we lay low in the water. I proffered two notes, my last cash now the dispensers were gone. I doubted I would need them; no annual literary dinner now all the Christchurch hotels were commandeered; our writers’ group was unlikely to last another four weeks. As we landed across the river I scrambled to get off, whilst others struggled to get on. They looked desperate, carrying as many belongings as possible, waving wads of money; the only words on their lips ‘Isle of Wight’. I watched as the little boat set off down river, things were worse than I thought. My fears were confirmed when I heard the bell of the Priory tolling. Many people were still around, madness in the air; we surged towards the high street and saw a spiral of smoke rising up.

82342999_1045374102482591_6282888605396369408_nBrexit Extreme had grown in power, disconcerting the respectable conservative Brexiteers, confounding the confused abstainers and putting terror in the hearts of Remainers. Hiding amongst the crowds, I made my way towards a bonfire in the centre of the road. The rabble were rushing out of the Regent Centre tossing paintings on the fire. Outside the tourist office a guard urged people to destroy the seditious pamphlets inside.

As I edged along the pavement towards the library, guards and civilians came out carrying piles of books, throwing them gleefully on to the blaze. Anything that smacked of elitism or liberalism was being destroyed. I looked up, from an open window fluttered white sheets of paper, the precious work of our writers’ group. I tried to catch them.

A guard spoke gruffly to me ‘You don’t belong to the writers’ group do you?’

‘No, No of course not’ I stuttered, moving on.

Someone fleeing from the library, shielding their eyes from the glare, shouted to me.

‘Aren’t you from the writers’ group?’

‘No, you must be thinking of someone else.’

I tucked my blue scarf with its gold stars deeper under my collar and fled into Saxon Square away from the heat; coming towards me were two members of my writing group; I put my collar up, turned and slipped back into the crowds. I heard a cheer go up, someone was coming out of the Regent Centre carrying aloft the Wooden Quill Poetry Award; he tossed it into the flames. I patted my pocket, inside was the memory stick with all my writing on; was I too late to get to the Isle of Wight?

©Janet Gogerty 2020

About Janet Gogerty

I have been writing frantically for 12 years and still enjoy being part of two writing groups. I am inspired by anything and everything and enjoy writing about ordinary people; but usually they find themselves experiencing strange events!

When I was encouraged to tackle a novel my daughter suggested I use my short story ‘Brief Encounters of the Third Kind’ as she wanted to know what happened to Emma, whose fate had been left in the air at the end of the story. The novel became a trilogy, Three Ages of Man and finally Lives of Anna Alsop, published in March 2015.

Quarter Acre Block was inspired by my family’s emmigration to Australia.

My new novel is called At The Seaside Nobody Hears You Scream. When Toby Channing’s girlfriend disappeared without trace he was the last person to see her…

I enjoy writing fiction of any length and have had many short stories published online.

Books by Janet Gogerty

One of the recent reviews for At The Seaside Nobody Hears You Scream.

Jane Deans 4.0 out of 5 stars A series of gentle mysteries Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 24 February 2020

This work is a series of short stories on the theme of ‘missing persons’ linked by the central character, Toby who is an amateur detective, himself attempting to find a missing girlfriend. The settings and characters are reminiscent of seaside postcards and evoke a bygone England of conventional households and family relationships. Most of the stories were gentle mysteries and there are references to familiar pub chains and English tourist destinations. The only parts that jarred for me were the elements containing a robot and one with a ghost, both of which were implausible in the context of the other stories.

Janet Gogerty, Buy:Amazon UK – And :Amazon US – Goodreads:Goodreads – Blog: Tidal Scribe WordPress – Twitter: @ytregog

 

Thank you for dropping by today and Janet would love to read your feedback and if you would like to participate in this series here is the link again: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Summer 2020- Pot Luck – #BookReview – A Snowflake in July by Abbie Johnson Taylor


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives… and I will be picking two posts from the blogs of those participating from the first six months of 2020. If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

This is the second post by Abbie Johnson Taylor and this week I am sharing one of her book reviews for a book on writing a novel.

Thursday Book Feature:  A Snowflake in July – How to Write Your Novel Using the Snowflake Method by Randy Ingermanson

How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method (Advanced Fiction Writing Book 1) by [Randy Ingermanson]

About the book

Are you writing a novel, but having trouble getting your first draft written? You’ve heard of “outlining,” but that sounds too rigid for you. You’ve heard of “organic writing,” but that seems a bit squishy to you.

Take a look at the wildly popular Snowflake Method—a battle-tested series of ten steps that jump-start your creativity and help you quickly map out your story. All around the world, novelists are using the Snowflake Method right now to ignite their imaginations and get their first drafts down on paper.

In this book, you’ll follow the story of a fictitious novelist as she learns to tap into the amazing power of the Snowflake Method. Almost magically, she finds her story growing from a simple idea into a deep and powerful novel. And she finds her novel changing her—turning her into a stronger, more courageous person.

How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method is a “business parable”—a how-to guide written in story form. It’s zany. It’s over the top. It’s just plain fun. Most important, it’s effective, because it shows you, rather than telling you. You’ll learn by example how to grow your story idea into a sizzling first draft. before you write it.

Abbie’s review for the book 23rd July 2020

I tried the Snowflake Method online several years ago when I was stuck on a novel I was writing. I gave up after the first two or three steps, and my novel eventually became a short story. But when a fellow writer recommended the Audible version of the book, I figured it was worth a second look. I discovered that this is the best book on novel-writing I’ve ever read.

Unlike other such books that just give you information and instructions, How to Write Your Novel Using the Snowflake Method turns the tale of Goldilocks and the three bears on its head in order to explain this method. You may wonder if this book is for children, but I assure you, it’s for adults who are serious about writing novels.

After weaving his compelling story to illustrate the ten steps of the Snowflake Method, Randy Ingermanson outlines the steps and includes his own steps in this method that he followed when writing his tale. A PDF document containing the steps and his own Snowflake Method can be downloaded for free from his website here.

I recommend this book to anyone interested in writing a novel. I may try the Snowflake Method with a new novel before I write it. 

Read some of the over 800 reviews for the book: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK

©Abbie Johnson Taylor 2020

Books by Abbie Johnson Taylor

About The Red Dress

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

A recent review for The Red Dress August 2020

The following is a portion of a review from Gerardo Corripio, who listened to the recorded version from the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled. (NLS) It was posted on an email list for NLS users.

This is one of those novels that’s a light read, but also has lots of little life tidbits that get you to think. The moral that comes to mind after reading the novel is something to the effect of “closing cycles”. It’s very realistically done, and I was able to readily identify with the characters, their situations and dynamics needed to cope. Forgiveness and its rewards are also a moral of the novel. How liberating it can be, not only for the ones affected, but for the families involved!

Abbie Johnson Taylor, BuyAmazon US:  Blog: Abbie’s Corner WordPress Goodreads: Abbie Johnson Taylor

I live in Sheridan, Wyoming, where for six years, I cared for my late husband Bill, totally blind, who was partially paralyzed by two strokes soon after we were married. Before that, I was a registered music therapist and worked for fifteen years in a nursing home and other facilities that served senior citizens. I have a visual impairment, and during this time, I facilitated a support group for others like me. I also taught braille and served on the advisory board of a trust fund that allows persons with blindness or low vision to purchase adaptive equipment and services.

I’m the author of a romance novel, two poetry collections, and a memoir and am working on another novel. My poems, short stories, and essays have been published in various journals and anthologies. I belong to several writers’ organizations and a women’s singing group and take water exercise classes at the YMCA

Thanks to Abbie for letting me share posts from her archives and I know she would be delighted to receive your feedback. Thanks Sally.

Thank you for dropping by today and  if you would like to participate in this series here is the link againPosts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Summer 2020- Pot Luck #Photography – Lens-Artists Photo Challenge#99: Old and New by Miriam Hurdle


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives… and I will be picking two posts from the blogs of those participating from the first six months of 2020. If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

This is the second post by poet Miriam Hurdle and this week I am sharing one of Miriam’s photography challenge posts with some stunning images of the old…the Terracotta Warriors and the new from her Nephew’s wedding in Hong Kong.

The theme for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #99 this week from Amy is Old and New.

The original Terracotta Warriors in Xi’an, China and their new replica.

China Xian

DSC02600 (2)

In Hong Kong, the few boat people (fishermen) live side by side with people living in high rises and those who own boats for recreation.

DSC02571b

Last year we went to my nephew’s wedding in Hong Kong. The modern wedding is often combined with a traditional ceremony (I snapped the second photo in a park).

IMG_2202 (2)

IMG_1477 (2)

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge#99: Old and New

©MIriam Hurdle 2020

About the collection

Songs of Heartstrings: Poems of Gratitude and Beatitude depicts a road traveled with optimism, hope and appreciation amid heartache and unpredictable circumstances. It also celebrates genuine love and fulfilling relationships.

The poetry collection includes nine themes: Songs of Nature, Songs of Dissonance, Songs of Physical Healing, Songs of Marriage, Songs of Parenthood, Songs of Tribute, Songs of Reflections, Songs of Challenge, and Songs of Inspiration. Each of these themes covers various aspects of her life experience.

The poems are inspiring to the mind, heart, and spirit. The readers will resonate with these experiences. Hurdle illustrates the poems with her photograph and watercolor paintings.

One of the recent reviews for the book

Jacqui Murray VINE VOICE  5.0 out of 5 stars Honest, deeply-rooted verse  Reviewed in the United States on August 23, 2020

Miriam Hurdle’s Songs of Heartstrings (2018) is a beautiful collection of poetry, inspired by music and nature, focused on thankfulness. She masterfully blends the two, at times, in the same poem, other times, simply under the same theme. Which works oh so well. I’m a fan of both music and nature (I’m a retired violinist and an armchair naturalist). There’s a resilience and honesty to both, a desire to tell the truth in their very essence. Miriam touches all corners of these worlds, from the grand outdoor sweep to the work of the tiny hummingbirds. Each poem in the collection (or most? I confess–I didn’t count, just noticed lots) includes not only Hurdle’s gorgeous words but a picture to inspire those more attuned to the visual, often taken by Miriam herself.

And as I lost myself in the feelings of her poems, I realized she was often sharing personal stories that shaped her life.

“The lessons I learned from nature give me hope and provide strength for the tired feet.”
xx
“Nature has a great capacity for healing and surviving devastating destruction.”

Miriam Hurdle, Buy also in Spanish and Portuguese: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK –  Goodreads: Miriam Hurdle – Blog: The Showers of Blessings –  Twitter: @mhurdle112

About Miriam Hurdle

Miriam Hurdle is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). She published four children’s books at twenty-six years old. Her poetry collection received the Solo “Medalist Winner” for the New Apple Summer eBook Award and achieved bestseller status on Amazon.

Miriam writes poetry, short stories, memoir, and children’s books. She earned a Doctor of Education from the University of La Verne in California. After two years of rehabilitation counseling, fifteen years of public-school teaching and ten years in school district administration, she retired and enjoys life with her husband in southern California, and the visits to her daughter, son-in-law, and granddaughters in Oregon. When not writing, she engages in blogging, gardening, photography, and traveling.

My thanks to Miriam for sharing these wonderful photographs and I know she would love your feedback.. thanks Sally.

Thank you for dropping by today and  if you would like to participate in this series here is the link again: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Summer 2020- Pot Luck- #Travel – Au Revoir or Adieu? by Janet Gogerty


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives… and I will be picking two posts from the blogs of those participating from the first six months of 2020. If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

This is the first post from author Janet Gogerty and this week a post from Janet’s archives in February of this year.. which, six months later is still very current.

Travel – Au Revoir or Adieu?

Whether you jet set on business or love going on cruises, you can’t have failed to notice there are more hazards to travel lately. Your cruise ship may weigh anchor and keep all the passengers hostage – in quarantine because of Coronavirus, which we now have to call Covid19, though that doesn’t slip as easily off the tongue. If you’re lucky you may get to have your own videoblog as self appointed spokesman to your national television channel and the folk back home. If you’re unlucky you will have a cabin without a balcony, a government that will not evacuate you and test positive for the virus.

Queen Mary copy

Is flying any better? You may not be allowed on the plane if you have a temperature, you may not be allowed off the plane until you can be hermetically sealed and sent off to a quarantine centre; though that could be the start of a pleasant fortnight’s holiday if a nice hotel has been commandeered. World wide plague is not the only hazard for fliers. Storms hurling themselves across the Atlantic to Europe have caused mass cancellation of flights, but that is better than the Ryanair passengers on a flight from Prague, that in hindsight should have been cancelled. Thrice, pilots attempted to land at Bournemouth Airport as passengers screamed and hyperventilated. They abandoned the attempt and with petrol running low were diverted to Brussels from whence they returned to Prague…

6

Although I hardly ever go anywhere outside this kingdom I can give advice on ocean liners and airliners. Cyberson 2, builder and pyrotechnics expert, has often worked at Southampton, sending up fireworks to farewell passengers on their trip of a lifetime, or often their twentieth or perhaps their last… The first time he worked there, one of the regular workers on the docks described the arrival of an ocean liner ‘The first thing that happens, they bring all the bodies off.’ Whether this is due to the age of the passengers, the vast amount of food provided or terminal boredom, I cannot say, but it sounds like a good way to go. Perhaps if you pay extra you can have a burial at sea. My longest voyage was on ‘The Pride of Bilbao’ from Portsmouth to Bilbao and back again on an off season excursion, where the only hazard was the live entertainment.

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Storm Dennis was not the only problem at Heathrow Airport on Sunday as ‘technical issues’ created chaos. Whiteboards, marker pens and extra staff were drafted in to ensure chaos continued. When I worked at Heathrow I won’t pretend I was not occasionally envious of passengers jetting off somewhere exotic, but mostly I was glad I could go home and would always advise DON’T even THINK of flying at Easter or Christmas. One Christmas Eve, working in Singapore Lounge, the evening flight was delayed, putting Christmas on hold in Singapore and Australia for those who celebrated it. I cringed as a young colleague said in a loud voice in front of the passengers ‘That’s ALL I need.’ We would be late finishing, but she only had to get home to Osterley Park and none of us were going to miss Christmas.

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Singapore Airlines treated their customers with oriental respect and had letters printed out and delivered to them explaining delays. When we worked in British Airways lounges catering staff were left to soothe disgruntled passengers. The huge lounge in Terminal 1 catered for the many short haul flights, very different from the serene atmosphere of quieter business lounges. There was an endless surge of passengers, the buffet bars constantly replenished, platters of sandwiches devoured instantly. I only worked there a couple of times, but one weekend a story came from our colleagues. There was a strike on; passengers kept coming in, but none went out. Then the British Airways staff abandoned the desk leaving the catering staff to deal with the ever increasing braying mob; in the end they called the police.

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What were your worst travel experiences? You can tell us about your good journeys, but that might not be so amusing…

©Janet Gogerty 2020

About Janet Gogerty

I have been writing frantically for 12 years and still enjoy being part of two writing groups. I am inspired by anything and everything and enjoy writing about ordinary people; but usually they find themselves experiencing strange events!

When I was encouraged to tackle a novel my daughter suggested I use my short story ‘Brief Encounters of the Third Kind’ as she wanted to know what happened to Emma, whose fate had been left in the air at the end of the story. The novel became a trilogy, Three Ages of Man and finally Lives of Anna Alsop, published in March 2015.

Quarter Acre Block was inspired by my family’s emmigration to Australia.

My new novel is called At The Seaside Nobody Hears You Scream. When Toby Channing’s girlfriend disappeared without trace he was the last person to see her…

I enjoy writing fiction of any length and have had many short stories published online.

Books by Janet Gogerty

One of the recent reviews for At The Seaside Nobody Hears You Scream.

Jane Deans 4.0 out of 5 stars A series of gentle mysteries Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 24 February 2020

This work is a series of short stories on the theme of ‘missing persons’ linked by the central character, Toby who is an amateur detective, himself attempting to find a missing girlfriend. The settings and characters are reminiscent of seaside postcards and evoke a bygone England of conventional households and family relationships. Most of the stories were gentle mysteries and there are references to familiar pub chains and English tourist destinations. The only parts that jarred for me were the elements containing a robot and one with a ghost, both of which were implausible in the context of the other stories.

Janet Gogerty, Buy:Amazon UK – And :Amazon US – Goodreads:Goodreads – Blog: Tidal Scribe WordPress – Twitter: @ytregog

 

Thank you for dropping by today and Janet would love to read your feedback and if you would like to participate in this series here is the link again: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Summer 2020- Pot Luck – TMI Tuesday February 25th, 2020 by Abbie Johnson Taylor


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives… and I will be picking two posts from the blogs of those participating from the first six months of 2020. If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

This is the first post by Abbie Johnson Taylor and this week she shares a little more about herself in the TMI Tuesday in February this year.

TMI Tuesday February 25th, 2020 by Abbie Johnson Taylor

Hello. Welcome. Do tell because it is TMI Tuesday!

What time of the day do you feel the most energetic, and what do you usually do in those moments?

I have the most energy in the mornings. However, I’ve discovered that if I eat a light supper earlier in the evening, I sleep better at night. When I get a good night’s sleep, I’m often just as energetic in the afternoons as I am in the mornings. I spend my days dealing with email and working on blog posts and other writing projects. I also attend water exercise classes at the YMCA three days a week and occasionally entertain at nursing homes and other senior facilities.

What’s the coolest thing about your life?

That would be the fact that I’m the author of five books with a sixth one in progress. My stories and poems have been published in The Weekly Avocet, Magnets and Ladders, and other publications. To learn more about me and my work, click here for my website

When are you most yourself?

Although I enjoy going out, I’m most myself when I’m at home, either working at my computer or relaxing in my recliner.

Would you rather be an ugly genius or a hot moron?

I’m not sure I want to be either. I’m happy as I am.

Would you abandon your phone, Internet, family, and friends for three months for a prize of 1 million dollars?

Never! All those things are important to me. Besides, what would I do with a million dollars?

Bonus: If you could wave a magic wand right now and have your life be perfect, what would that new life look like?

The perfect life would be one where I could see well enough to drive and maintain my own home without assistance. But there are worse things in life than being visually impaired. So, I’m not going to complain.

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If you’d like to participate in TMI Tuesday, click here and follow the instructions. If you don’t have a blog, you’re welcome to leave your answers to any or all these questions in the comment field below. Any way you do it, I look forward to reading your responses. Thank you for stopping by today.

©Abbie Johnson Taylor 2020

Books by Abbie Johnson Taylor

About The Red Dress

When Eve went to her high school senior prom, she wore a red dress that her mother had made for her. That night, after dancing with the boy of her dreams, she caught him in the act with her best friend. Months later, Eve, a freshman in college, is bullied into giving the dress to her roommate. After her mother finds out, their relationship is never the same again.

Twenty-five years later, Eve, a bestselling author, is happily married with three children. Although her mother suffers from dementia, she still remembers, and Eve still harbors the guilt for giving the dress away. When she receives a Facebook friend request from her old college roommate and an invitation to her twenty-five-year high school class reunion, then meets her former best friend by chance, she must confront the past in order to face the future.

A recent review for The Red Dress August 2020

The following is a portion of a review from Gerardo Corripio, who listened to the recorded version from the National Library Services for the Blind and Print Disabled. (NLS) It was posted on an email list for NLS users.

This is one of those novels that’s a light read, but also has lots of little life tidbits that get you to think. The moral that comes to mind after reading the novel is something to the effect of “closing cycles”. It’s very realistically done, and I was able to readily identify with the characters, their situations and dynamics needed to cope. Forgiveness and its rewards are also a moral of the novel. How liberating it can be, not only for the ones affected, but for the families involved!

Abbie Johnson Taylor, Buy: Amazon US:  Blog: Abbie’s Corner WordPress Goodreads: Abbie Johnson Taylor

I live in Sheridan, Wyoming, where for six years, I cared for my late husband Bill, totally blind, who was partially paralyzed by two strokes soon after we were married. Before that, I was a registered music therapist and worked for fifteen years in a nursing home and other facilities that served senior citizens. I have a visual impairment, and during this time, I facilitated a support group for others like me. I also taught braille and served on the advisory board of a trust fund that allows persons with blindness or low vision to purchase adaptive equipment and services.

I’m the author of a romance novel, two poetry collections, and a memoir and am working on another novel. My poems, short stories, and essays have been published in various journals and anthologies. I belong to several writers’ organizations and a women’s singing group and take water exercise classes at the YMCA

Thanks to Abbie for letting me share posts from her archives and I know she would be delighted to receive your feedback. Thanks Sally.

Thank you for dropping by today and  if you would like to participate in this series here is the link again: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Summer 2020- Pot Luck – #Family New Granddaughter by Miriam Hurdle


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives… and I will be picking two posts from the blogs of those participating from the first six months of 2020. If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

This is the first post by poet Miriam Hurdle and she shares the birth of a new granddaughter and the fact that she could not be there as planned due to the pandemic. And she also shares the loveliest of photos.

A new Granddaughter by Miriam Hurdle

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I visited my daughter Mercy at the end of February. Her friend planned a baby shower on Saturday for her second baby. I arrived on Thursday. Her friend called on Friday to cancel the shower because she was exposed to someone who might have exposed to the Coronavirus. She didn’t want to take the risk to cause any harm to my daughter’s pregnancy.

Mercy has a headache and runny nose. She worried that she might have the virus. Nobody knew exactly the symptoms of the new disease. I didn’t want her to add any worry to her pregnancy. I told her that the Coronavirus may have flu-like symptoms, but not all the flu-like symptoms lead to the new disease.

My son-in-law Will took Autumn out for a bike riding. Mercy and I spent time talking about various things while I gave her a head and shoulder massage. She had a good night sleep and felt better the next morning. She was relieved that it wasn’t a Coronavirus.

After I came home to southern California, I booked the tickets to fly back on March 24, four days before Mercy’s due day. They needed someone to watch my two-and-a-half-year-old granddaughter, Autumn.

On Thursday, March 11, The California Governor announced the social distancing policy that the gatherings should not be over 200 people. By Friday, March 12, the school districts announced closing of the classes. Our church announced cancelling all the meetings, including small group meetings. The world was crumbling down like an avalanche.

On Tuesday, March 17, Mercy and I had a video chat. She said she worried about my health and didn’t want me to get sick from the pandemic. I tried to ease her worry for me and still wanted to go. After talking for a few minutes, I sensed that she also worried that if I got sick, it would affect the babies. I then canceled my trip.

On Sunday, March 22, Mercy went to the hospital at 5:00 a.m. with 7cm dilation. She video called me at 9:00 a.m. before taking a nap. Baby Nora was born at 12:30 p.m. weighted 6 pounds and 7 ounces. Will sent me a couple photos of baby Nora. Mercy video called me again around 1:00 p.m. and chatted.

The doctor discharged her on Tuesday afternoon, even though the baby didn’t eat too much and didn’t have too many pees and poos yet. Because of the Coronavirus, the doctor sent her home with distant support. She called me again on Wednesday when she was feeding the baby. They were thrilled to have Nora.

I later found out that on March 22, they left Autumn at home while she was sleeping. Will dropped off Mercy at the hospital and rushed back home. Will was not with Mercy when baby Nora was born. In the afternoon, their friends watched Autumn for a couple hours so that Will could go see Mercy and the new baby. How I wish to have been there!

Will started taking paternity leaves. When he resumes working, he still works at home because of the Coronavirus. It’s so good to have him working at home in times like these.

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©MIriam Hurdle 2020

About the collection

Songs of Heartstrings: Poems of Gratitude and Beatitude depicts a road traveled with optimism, hope and appreciation amid heartache and unpredictable circumstances. It also celebrates genuine love and fulfilling relationships.

The poetry collection includes nine themes: Songs of Nature, Songs of Dissonance, Songs of Physical Healing, Songs of Marriage, Songs of Parenthood, Songs of Tribute, Songs of Reflections, Songs of Challenge, and Songs of Inspiration. Each of these themes covers various aspects of her life experience.

The poems are inspiring to the mind, heart, and spirit. The readers will resonate with these experiences. Hurdle illustrates the poems with her photograph and watercolor paintings.

One of the recent reviews for the book

Jacqui Murray VINE VOICE  5.0 out of 5 stars Honest, deeply-rooted verse  Reviewed in the United States on August 23, 2020

Miriam Hurdle’s Songs of Heartstrings (2018) is a beautiful collection of poetry, inspired by music and nature, focused on thankfulness. She masterfully blends the two, at times, in the same poem, other times, simply under the same theme. Which works oh so well. I’m a fan of both music and nature (I’m a retired violinist and an armchair naturalist). There’s a resilience and honesty to both, a desire to tell the truth in their very essence. Miriam touches all corners of these worlds, from the grand outdoor sweep to the work of the tiny hummingbirds. Each poem in the collection (or most? I confess–I didn’t count, just noticed lots) includes not only Hurdle’s gorgeous words but a picture to inspire those more attuned to the visual, often taken by Miriam herself.

And as I lost myself in the feelings of her poems, I realized she was often sharing personal stories that shaped her life.

“The lessons I learned from nature give me hope and provide strength for the tired feet.”
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“Nature has a great capacity for healing and surviving devastating destruction.”

Miriam Hurdle, Buy also in Spanish and Portuguese: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK –  Goodreads: Miriam Hurdle – Blog: The Showers of Blessings –  Twitter: @mhurdle112

About Miriam Hurdle

Miriam Hurdle is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). She published four children’s books at twenty-six years old. Her poetry collection received the Solo “Medalist Winner” for the New Apple Summer eBook Award and achieved bestseller status on Amazon.

Miriam writes poetry, short stories, memoir, and children’s books. She earned a Doctor of Education from the University of La Verne in California. After two years of rehabilitation counseling, fifteen years of public-school teaching and ten years in school district administration, she retired and enjoys life with her husband in southern California, and the visits to her daughter, son-in-law, and granddaughters in Oregon. When not writing, she engages in blogging, gardening, photography, and traveling.

My thanks to Miriam for sharing this lovely news of an addition to the family and I know she would love your feedback.. thanks Sally.

 

Thank you for dropping by today and  if you would like to participate in this series here is the link again: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives -Summer 2020- Pot Luck -How #Facebook Changes Work Better for Managing #Groups by Marsha Ingrao


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives… and I will be picking two posts from the blogs of those participating from the first six months of 2020. If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

This is the second post from author and blogger Marsha Ingrao and this week shares how the recent changes to Facebook have made it easier to manage groups.

Facebook Changes better for managing groups

The new Facebook changes are not a hoax. I switched over the first day it showed up on my screen inviting me to try it. It is much more group friendly.

First of all your groups are listed easily by clicking a button on the top. You may learn that you manage more than you thought. It surprised me to learn that one of the groups I created through a page I manage didn’t show up under my managed groups.

The first change I noticed was a note on one of the groups I follow with a post about being able to search a post. I’ve spent way too much time looking for a post I know is in the group and there is a way to search that group.

The menu on the side makes it easier to make changes on your group. You don’t have to open the settings button for everything.

Less Reliance on News Feed

The last change that Facebook unearthed complaints about missing people in their News Feed. Since many people use Facebook to find groups and events., this new look should make it easier to use those features and be less reliant on News Feed for their group news.

So far I like the look. What do you think?

Related post: How to Use Canva to Create Social Media Posts

©Marsha Ingrao

About Marsha Ingrao

Hi, my name is Marsha Ingrao. My husband, Vince and, our dog and three, no five cats live in Central California. Tulare County is the home of Agribusiness and the World Ag Expo.

Our house, BellaVista, nestles on an acre between several foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range with a straight-on view of Sawtooth Mountain. Ancient oak trees harvested by the Yokuts Indians line our street.

picture of our house in Central California

We are super proud of our little house, which we rescued from a bank nineteen years ago.

We pulled into the driveway and instead of weeds and peeling paint my husband saw potential. I believed in his vision. He redesigned it and together we’ve pieced it together into a work of art. It’s a living jigsaw puzzle.

If you could see down the road forty- minutes away, you would see the big trees in the Sequoia National Park. Discover more about Marsha, her career and family: About Marsha Ingrao

Marsha has written a history of Woodlake and the surrounding area

About the book

Known as the area “within the magic circle,” the Western town of Woodlake, along with its surrounding valley, is rich in both natural resources and hardworking citizens who are proud of their heritage. Most Tulare County towns sprang up along the Southern Pacific Railroad. Woodlake, designed as a tourist town, drew together farming communities, consisting of people too busy raising fruit and cattle to create a town. Starting with Thomas Henry Davis in 1853, settlers established farms and ranches, which attracted Los Angeles millionaire Gilbert Stevenson when he arrived in 1907. Approved by the Tulare County Board of Supervisors on October 3, 1911, the world-class tourist town named Woodlake grew from Stevenson’s imagination into reality. Led by the strong sales personality of its founder, Woodlake grew quickly, yet it remained a Western town, retaining reference points to the early communities that visitors would not find on signs. Visitors to Woodlake today will find Woodlakeans still doing what

Buy the book: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK – Website/Blog: TC History Gal – Facebook: TC History Gal – Twitter: @MarshaIngrao – LinkedIn: Marsha Ingrao

 Thanks to Marsha for allowing me to share her post and she would love your feedback.. thanks Sally.

 

If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives -Summer 2020- Pot Luck – Z-Day UK and COVID-19 by Pranav Lal


This the second post from photographer and writer Pranav Lal and this week he reflects on how some fiction might over offer tips on survival skills  should a pandemic such as Covid-19 eventually overwhelm the world. (I feel relatively safe sharing this post as most of our countries lift their restrictions, but sounds like a useful survival manual).

Z-Day UK and COVID-19 by Pranav Lal

Z-DAY UK by [Mark Long, Shane Feazell]

Many of you reading this post are in lock down which means moving out of your house is severely restricted. I should pause and ask how many of you think I am going to talk about what to do?

There is plenty of advice out there on what to do. One thing I was doing was rereading Z-Day UK by Mark Long. Mr. Long’s book deals with a zombie apocalypse situation where a virus begins to make ordinary humans zombies. This is not as far fetched as it may seem. I am not talking about COVID-19 here. The agent per SE does not matter.

As of this writing, people are not zombies nor is law and order breaking down at least for now. I have been thinking about what happens once the lock down is lifted. We need to maintain social distance. People are not going to attack us but there is that 2 meter gap that we should maintain else risk being infected. There are valuable lessons in the book that we can adapt to this situation.

The easiest lesson to apply is the bit about staying covered. What should I wear? Admittedly, military grade equipment as suggested in some parts of the book is hard to come by but one should aim for getting the best protective equipment as far as possible. Think motor cycle leathers.

One of the first chapters in the book is about building a base of operations. I am in India and have been thinking about this very hard. The cities are crowded but so are the villages. Think of all the migrants moving back to the villages. As the book says, you do not want to be stuck when the exodus begins. I do not have any firm answers. May be a farm in the suburbs?

The countryside is actually a better choice but again, the India context is a little different due to our population density. I plan to read chapter 11 that goes into details before buying any property. Transportation too is a consideration. We have plenty of bicycles and they are not hard to get. We can get quite far on them. Tractors are also easy to get and I suspect the venerable Mahindra tractor should do the job; not that we need to run away from people just now.

The next question is of skills. This is a particular issue for those of us who use the computer as a means of livelihood like programmers, cyber security professionals etc. We are working from home and our work is uniquely suited to such a near 100% digital setup but in the event we do have to move away from the Internet, what hard skill can we acquire? First aid comes to mind for one thing and so does carpentry and cooking. These skills are handy to have in any case.

There is a significant amount of space devoted to heating and using older houses as they are better adapted to handle a lack of electricity. Indian conditions vary widely but we do have plenty of wood and coal burning stoves which we will have to go back to. Fuel does not last.

Creating a defensible area though is a challenge especially in the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Flat land does not make for easily defensible territory. However, it is a question worth considering especially if you plan to create a permanent base.

There is much much more in the book and it has been brought into sharp relevance for me thanks to COVID-19. My favorite section is on libraries and the storage of knowledge. If we do enter the world Mr. Long has described or get close to one, please do not forget this aspect.

The book is available: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK

©Pranav Lal April 2020

About Pranav Lal

Pranav Lal is a short story and novella writer based out of New Delhi, India and the author of seven books.  These include the Telekinesis Trilogy series – Telekinesis (2015), Led Weight (2018), and Cult 2019 ; Venture Capital (2015), In Case of Emergency (2015), Julia (2015), and the audio enabled comic book Bakasura (2016).

Pranav is blind and that makes him put his characters through tough and complex situations.  He imagines how one would think, process, evaluate, and take decisions, and see the effects of those playing out – the cycle of Karma and Dharma.  He also likes to read the New Scientist, Scientific American, Science Direct – magazines that focus on the shape of technology and its effects on humankind.  And this provides him the opportunity to explore different concepts, especially in science, with a common underlying theme – human psychology.

The components of the vOICe (Picture credit Caltech)
Pranav is an avid photographer – To share his sense of vision with others, Pranav started blogging (his blog is called Techesoterica.com). Around this time, he was introduced to what he calls his “artificial eye,” an augmented reality device called vOICe (OIC stands for ‘oh I see’). The brainchild of Dutch inventor Peter Meijer, vOICe is a vision technology that converts images to sound. Read more: Your Story – Pranav Lal

Pranav also writes non-fiction and has been  featured in print, news, and on other media platforms. He works in a multinational corporation.

The flower market in his neighbourhood gets a fresh look in his pictures.

Connect to Pranav: Website: Techesoteric –  Facebook: Pranav Lal – Twitter:  @PranavLal – Writing Blog: Pranav writes

 

Thank you for dropping by and Pranav would love to have your feedback . thanks Sally.