William Price King meets some Legends – Barbra Streisand – 1980s/1990s and films


Welcome to this week’s look at the life and work of Barbra Streisand and today we focus on her films. Not only was she a very talented actress but she also won critical acclaim for her writing and directing.  I will now hand you over to William to carry on with the story.

Barbra Streisand had read Yentl, The Yeshiva Boy by Isaac Bashevis Singer in 1968 but it was to be over 15 years before she was able to co-write, co- produce, direct and star in the film. The film received five Academy Award nominations and Barbra Streisand received Golden Globe Awards as both Best Director and producer of the Best Picture (musical comedy). The soundtrack of the film also went into the Top Ten.

Here is a clip from the film – Where is it Written.

This success was follwed by The Broadway Album in 1985 which took Barbra back to the top of the charts. This was the 24th studio album and was released by Columbia records in the November. Although mainly show tunes from the many musicals that she had appeared in, there were some original tracks including additional lyrics by Stephen Sondheim for Putting it Together and Send in the Clowns. The album went Gold in January 1986 and by January 1995 it was still selling well enough to have sold 7.5 million copies and gone four times Platinum. It also resulted in a Grammy Nomination for album of the year and Barbra Streisand won her 8th Grammy as Best Female Vocalist.

In 1987 Barbara wrote the music, produced and starred in the film Nuts. Directed by Martin Ritt, the film also starred Richard Dreyfuss, Karl Malden, Robert Webber and Eli Wallach. A hard hitting film about a call girl on trial for murder, whose traumatic past is slowly unravelled by her public defender, played by Richard Dreyfuss.

In 1991 Barbra Streisand returned to directing again with Prince of Tides based on the Pat Conroy novel and starring Nick Nolte. This American romantic drama received seven Academy Award nominations including for best picture but lost out to Silence of the Lambs. Barbra also received a nomination from the Directors Guild of America for her direction, making her only the third woman ever so honored.

With a return to music and the studio Barbra released “Back to Broadway” in June 1993. Whilst not as successful as her first Broadway album it did debut at #1 on the pop charts.

I Have Love, One Hand, One heart

“I Have a Love/One Hand, One Heart,” from “West Side Story” is a heart throbbing medley featuring Streisand and the incredible Johnny Mathis, from the album “Back to Broadway,” 1993. Here, you have two of the most beautiful voices in the world singing two of the most beautiful songs written by the incomparable Leonard Bernstein. A treat.

In 1993, The New York Times music critic Stephen Holden wrote that Streisand “enjoys a cultural status that only one other American entertainer, Frank Sinatra, has achieved in the last half century”.

In September 1993, Streisand announced her first public concert appearances in 27 years (if one does not count her Las Vegas nightclub performances between 1969 and 1972). Tickets for the tour were sold out in under an hour.

The tour was one of the biggest all-media merchandise parlays in history. Ticket prices ranged from US$50 to US$1,500, making Streisand the highest-paid concert performer in history”. “Barbra Streisand: The Concert” went on to be the top-grossing concert of the year and earned five Emmy Awards and the Peabody Award, while the taped broadcast on HBO was the highest-rated concert special in HBO’s 30-year history.

Her performance resulted in the Top 10, million-selling album, “The Concert.” The tour itself generated over $10 million for charities, including AIDS organizations, women and children in jeopardy, Jewish/Arab relations, and agencies working to improve relations between African-Americans and Jews. Streisand’s philanthropy and activism also extends to her Barwood Film’s productions, such as “The Long Island Incident,” which inspired a national debate on gun control.

In 1996, Streisand directed and starred in the romantic comedy drama The Mirror Has Two Faces also starring Jeff Bridges. Whilst not all critics liked the film, some did and Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times had this to say.

The film approaches the subject of marriage warily and with wit, like George Bernard Shaw . . . it’s rare to find a film that deals intelligently with issues of sex and love, instead of just assuming that everyone on the screen and in the audience shares the same popular culture assumptions. It’s rare, too, to find such verbal characters in a movie, and listening to them talk is one of the pleasures of The Mirror Has Two Faces . . . this is a moving and challenging movie.”

I finally Found Someone

“I Finally Found Someone” is a duet by Streisand and the Canadian artist Bryan Adams from the film and was nominated for an Oscar. This was Streisand’s first significant hit in almost a decade and her first top 10 hit since 1981. This song was written by Barbra Streisand, Bryan Adams, Robert John Lange, and Marvin Hamlisch.

As well as the album Higher Ground released in 1997, in 1998 following her marriage to James Brolin, Barbra released an album of love songs A Love Like Ours. The critics felt it was a little over sweet however her fans enjoyed and it did produce a modest hit.

“If You Ever Leave Me”, a duet with Vince Gill.

“If You Ever Leave Me,” a duet with country music star Vince Gill, from the album “A Love Like Ours” (her 23rd Top 10 album in the US), 1999, was intended to be a country song, but was given a measured, polished adult contemporary production. This was Streisand’s first commercial release since her marriage to actor James Brolin. It was rumored that much of the material on this album was inspired by this event. The song peaked at #62 on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart, and at #26 in the UK.

Read all the reviews and buy Barbra Streisand’s music: https://www.amazon.com/Barbra-Streisand/e/B000AQ2ZRU

Additional information sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbra_Streisand

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find all of William’s posts on Jazz, Classical and Contemporary artists in this link: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-a-man-and-his-music-jazz-classical-and-contemporary-legends/

I hope you have enjoyed the music today and please join us again next week for the finale of the series.

William Price King meets Some Legends – Barbra Streisand – The Collaborations


This week we are going to be sharing some of Barbra Streisand’s collaborations in the 1970s and 1980s that have stood the test of time.  Next week we will focus on her films of the 1980s such as Yentl  and Prince of Tides.

Today just sit back and enjoy the music.

You Don’t Bring Me Flowers

“You Don’t Bring Me Flowers,” originally from the Neil Diamond 1977 album “I’m Glad You’re Here with Me Tonight,” was written by Neil Diamond, along with Alan and Marilyn Bergman. This song was, initially, a solo performance by Diamond. Early in 1978, Streisand covered the song on her album “Songbird.” Radio WAKY-AM/Louisville KY program director, Gary Guthrie, spliced the two solo tracks together as a going away present to his wife, whom he had just divorced. This triggered a media buzz worldwide from “Good Morning America” and “People” magazine to the BBC. Interest in the duet caused such a clamor that Columbia Records was compelled to bring Streisand and Diamond into the studio to record an “official” version in October 1978. The song reached number one on the Hot 100 chart for two non-consecutive weeks in December 1978, producing the third number one hit for both singers. Acknowledgment and gratitude for Guthrie came from CBS with a Gold record plaque, flowers from Diamond and a telegram from Streisand. The duo performed the song at the 1980 Grammy Awards show, a performance released on the 1994 album “Grammy’s Greatest Moments Volume 1.”

 

Guilty

“Guilty” was Streisand’s twenty-second studio album, written and produced by Barry Gibb of the Bee Gees. It became her best-selling album to date internationally, with sales between 15–20 million copies worldwide as well as spawning several hit singles. The title track, and second single from the album, was a duet between Streisand and Gibb, winning the Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal in 1981.

 

No More Tears (Enough is Enough)

“No More Tears (Enough is Enough)” was a 1979 duet that Streisand recorded with Donna Summer. The song was recorded for Streisand’s “Wet” album and also as a new track for Summer’s compilation double album entitled “On the Radio: Greatest Hits Volumes 1 & 2.” The single went to number one on the Billboard Hot 100, making it both singers’ fourth chart-topping single in the US, and number one for four weeks on the disco chart. It was also a big international hit, and made the top three in the UK. Unfortunately, they never performed the song together live after recording it.

 

Woman in Love

“Woman in Love” is a song from Streisand’s 1980 album, “Guilty,” written by Barry and Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees. It was her fourth of four Platinum records, and is considered her greatest international hit, reaching number one in many countries, including in the UK Singles Chart. Streisand has openly stated that she doesn’t like “Woman In Love” because she doesn’t believe in the meaning of the lyrics, and has rarely performed the song live.

Read all the reviews and buy Barbra Streisand’s music: https://www.amazon.com/Barbra-Streisand/e/B000AQ2ZRU

Additional information sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbra_Streisand

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find all of William’s posts on Jazz, Classical and Contemporary artists in this link: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-a-man-and-his-music-jazz-classical-and-contemporary-legends/

I hope you have enjoyed some memories of 1970s and 1980s and please join us again next week.. thanks Sally

William Price King Meets some Legends – Barbra Streisand – 1960s/1970s – It’s all about the music


To celebrate some of the most memorable music of Barbra Streisand the focus of today’s post is the music from the award winning movies that she starred in and also composed music for, during the mid- 1960s and early 1970s. William Price King has selected some of her greatest hits from this period along with the background to the tracks.

Hello Dolly is a 1964 musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilder’s 1938 farce “The Merchant of Yonkers,” which Wilder revised and retitled “The Matchmaker” in 1955. Streisand’s Dolly is a rebuke to the modern anxiety about whether or not women can or should “have it all”. Her Dolly is an impressive striver with a heart of gold who knows what she wants, and her ability to convey joy, longing, and lightness with her voice is unparalleled. Louis Armstrong, whose recording of “Hello Dolly” became a number-one single in May 1964, also performs the song (together with Streisand).

In 1965 building on the success of Funny Girl, Hello Dolly and albums of the early 1960s, Barbra Streisand turned to the new vehicle for stardom, reaching into everyone’s home. Her television show ‘My Name is Barbra‘ was an immediate success and received five Emmy awards and CBS gave her a ten year contract to produce and star in more specials. Barbra was given complete artistic control of the next four productions.

In 1966 ‘Funny Girl’ went to London at the Prince of Wales Theater, followed by the screen version in 1968, winning Barbra Streisand an Academy Award. She also won a Golden Globe and was named ‘Star of the Year’ by the National Association of Theater Owners.

In 1969 Barbra achieved big screen success with the film version “Hello, Dolly!” followed a year later by “On a Clear Day You Can See Forever“. With a step away from musicals she starred in “The Owl and the Pussycat” in 1970 with George Segal  and in 1972 “What’s Up Doc?” with Ryan O’Neal.  The same year she founded her own production company, Barwood Films with the first being “Up the Sandbox”.

Up the Sandbox was one of the first films to explore women’s changing roles during the sexual revolution of the early 1970s. A number of critics praised Streisand’s performance. According to Pauline Kael, “Barbra Streisand [had] never seemed so radiant as in this joyful mess, taken from the Anne Richardson Roiphe novel and directed by Irvin Kershner. The picture is full of knockabout urban humor”

At the beginnning of the 1970s Barbra Streisand had moved into more contemporary material and found her niches in the pop and ballad charts with her album “Stoney End” in 1971.

“Stoney End,”a Laura Nyro composition, redefined Streisand as an effective pop/rock singer. It was released in the US in 1971 and charted at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 2 on the Adult Contemporary chart. It also reached number 27 on the UK singles chart. This recording was a change in direction for Streisand, with a more upbeat contemporary pop sound. When asked by fans during the Q&A segment of Streisand’s Back To Brooklyn concert on October 11, 2012 what “Stoney End” was about, she replied that she still didn’t know.

In 1973 Barbra starred in “The Way We Were” with Robert Redford. Directed by Sydney Pollack with a screenplay by Arthur Laurents, the story follows Laurent’s college days at Cornell University and his experiences with the House Un-American Activities Committee. The HUAC was created in 1938 to investigate alleged disloyalty and subversive activities on the part of private citizens, public employees, and those organizations suspected of having communist ties. Many in Hollywood would find themselves as subjects of this organisation over the next twenty years or so.

“The Way We Were” won the Oscar for Best Original Dramatic Score and Best Original Song. It ranked at number 6 on AFI’s 100 Years …100 Passions survey of the top 100 greatest love stories in American cinema. The song became a million-selling gold single, topping the Billboard 100 and selling more than two million copies. Billboard named “The Way We Were” as the number 1 pop hit of 1974. In 1998, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame and finished at number 8 on AFI’s 100 Years … 100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema in 2004. It was also included in the list of Songs of the Century, by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts.

The next hit that would bring awards for Barbra Streisand was the film “A Star is Born” in 1976 starring Kris Kristofferson.. The plot sees a young woman entering show business, meeting and falling in love with an established star who acts as her mentor. As she becomes more successful his career begins to decline with the resulting dramatic results.

“Evergreen” is the theme song from the  film, composed by the diva herself, with lyrics by Paul Williams. Both Streisand and Williams earned an Oscar and a Golden Globes Award for Best Original Song. Streisand was the first woman ever to be honored with an Oscar as a composer. In addition to that, “Evergreen” won the Grammy Award for “Song of the Year.”

Read all the reviews and buy Barbra Streisand’s music: https://www.amazon.com/Barbra-Streisand/e/B000AQ2ZRU

Additional information sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbra_Streisand

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Previous Legends can be found here:

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-meets-some-legends/

You will find the previous artists..  Luciano Pavarotti, Andrea Bocelli, Kiri Te Kanawa in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/classical-music-with-william-price-king/

And for the Jazz in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-jazz-and-music-series/

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you have enjoyed the show.. Please feel free to share.

Music that Means Something Challenge – Day 3 – A Woman in Love – Barbra Streisand


Sue Vincent kindly nominated me for this challenge.  Music that Means Something to You which entails posting a song a day with the reasons behind your choice… this might include the lyrics or the style of music or perhaps an event that this piece reminds you of.

To read how it should be done here is Sue’s Day 1 – with the music and profound lyrics of Leonard Cohen.  https://scvincent.com/2017/04/08/music-that-means-something-day-1-leonard-cohen/

The rules of the challenge are simple:
Post a song a day for five consecutive days.
Post what the lyrics mean to you. (Optional)
Post the name of the song and a video.
Nominate 1 or 2 bloggers each day of the challenge.

Today I nominate D.G Kaye (Debby Gies) who I hope might be able to find time to share at least one or two posts on music that means a great deal to her. We share similar tastes across a number of areas and I suspect that we also share some tunes too. Here is one of Debby’s latest blog posts https://dgkayewriter.com/guest-author-feature-uvi-poznansky-dancing-with-air/

The twist in the challenge is that the lyrics should mean something….

Luckily for me I had actually posted a musical memory every week for a year which means that I have 52 of my favourite tracks and artists to choose from for this five day challenge.

As Frank Sinatra would say, 1980 for me was a very good year… I was happy in my job, had a whole bunch of new friends in the area, loved my job as the assistant manager Bontddu Hall near Dolgellau in Wales and on April 1st my divorce was finalised.  An auspicious day if ever there was one.

It had taken me three years and my savings to get over this time in my life but it had been worth it. I was now 27 years old and as I held that precious piece of paper with the words Decree Absolute in bold print emblazoned across it; I vowed that I would never marry again! You know what they say about famous last words don’t you?

Anyway the second great event was that I took and passed my driving test. I had begun driving at age 17 and had several lessons but then ran out of money.

After living midway between Barmouth and Dolgellau for over a year and having walked myself down to a size 10; I decided that I should book some more lessons and take the test. I signed up with Mr. Evans in Dolgellau who would pick me up in his mini in the middle of the afternoon during my couple of hours off.

I have never regretted those lessons on narrow Welsh roads as they have stood me in good stead when driving in various countries and terrains around the world. However, there was one slight problem at that time in my local area…No traffic lights and no roundabouts. Road works were useful for practice but we had to drive 30 miles north of Dolgellau to find a roundabout. We would go around and around this damn thing for about ten minutes before heading back before the lesson finished.

I was very lucky to have met a wonderful friend called Joan who was a district nurse and used her own car for work. On my day off she would let me drive and we travelled the length and breadth of North Wales, up and down mountains to give me as much practice as possible. That August I passed my test in Machynlleth despite stalling at … You guessed it… Traffic lights.

sally wedding day 1980Rightly chuffed with my achievement I set about putting away a little each week towards a car… But of course fate was about to take a hand in my life yet again.

In the first week in September I took a call in reception for a booking for two single rooms with arrival on September 16th for two weeks. I thought at the time that the caller, a Mr. David Cronin, had a lovely Irish accent and when I had booked the rooms and put the telephone down, I turned to one of the receptionists on duty and said jokingly; ‘What a lovely voice, I think I will marry him.’

On the day that Mr. Cronin was due to arrive I had a few extra hours off as I had been filling in for the said receptionist who was off for a week at a family wedding. I came on duty at 6.30 p.m. in my long dress to carry out my evening duties, which were to accompany our guests to their table in the dining-room, and then ensure that they were happy with their meals etc throughout the evening.

Put it this way; I was not disappointed when I met the owner of the voice on the end of the phone for the first time and escorted him to the best table!

For the next two weeks our paths crossed several times and I arranged some business meetings and meals for Mr. Cronin. His room, Number 40, was at the top of the flight of stairs on the first landing and as I checked the hotel before locking up for the night, I would pass by and see a light under the door and wonder about this very nice man.

On the night before he was due to check out, he approached me and asked if, when I finished for the evening, I could meet him for a drink in the Blue Lounge, which intrigued I did. We chatted and completed the Telegraph cryptic crossword whilst enjoying an excellent whisky and water before he handed me a small packet. He said it was a thank you for arranging his meetings so efficiently.

It was a Celtic pendant on a silver chain with a small note in the box… For going beyond the call of duty. Best wishes David Cronin.

I obviously thanked him and was very sad that he would be leaving the next day and  that I would be unlikely to see him again. But he continued to surprise me by asking me out for lunch the following day; when I would be off duty until the evening. Of course I accepted and he booked himself in for a further night rather than travel back to Liverpool. It was at this point that I began calling him David rather than Mr. Cronin.

We had lunch and walked along Harlech beach where they were making a film at the time. As we chatted, stuntmen thundered past dressed in Arab costumes on fiery stallions, kicking up the sand. Talk about romantic.

After work that evening we met up again and talked for a long time. The next morning as we prepared to say goodbye, David simply said… I think there is only one thing for us… Will you marry me?

That was September 29th and we moved in to a small holiday flat together when the hotel closed on October 5th and we were married in Dolgellau registry office five weeks later on November 15th 1980.

sally wedding day 1980

See what I mean about famous last words!!

Of all the songs that year I know that the song that held the most significance for me was Woman in Love by Barbra Streisand. For me love had been very challenging and I had no idea that day in September in 1980 that a voice at the end of the telephone would change my world forever.

Buy A Woman in Love: https://www.amazon.com/Woman-Love-Greatest-Barbra-Streisand/dp/B007M09SQI

Thank you for dropping in to share this challenge with me.  Here are the previous days.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/04/10/music-that-means-something-challenge-day-1-younger-than-springtime-south-pacific/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/04/11/music-that-means-something-challenge-day-2-brown-sugar-the-rolling-stones/