Smorgasbord Blogger Daily – Friday 29th January 2021 – #FullMoon Joan Hall, #Poetry Robbie Cheadle, #CoAuthorship John W. Howell


Welcome to a small selection of posts that I have enjoyed in the last few days and I hope you will head over to enjoy in full..thanks Sally.

The first post is from Joan Hall who shares the wonderful myths and legends behind the various Full Moons throughout the year.

January – The Wolf Moon

Hey, everyone. Hope the first part of this new year have been good for you. It’s no secret that I have a fascination with full moons. I think it runs in the family. My brother once hiked through Grand Canyon by the light of a full August moon.

Also, the original concept for my upcoming Legends of Madeira series was inspired by, you guessed it, the moon. I thought it would be fun to feature a monthly post with some facts, myths, or maybe even a legend or two.

For years, I’d heard the term Harvest Moon, but did you know Native Americans had names for each of the full moons? These varied from tribe to tribe and were often relative to the area in which they lived. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, these names traditionally applied to the entire lunar month, beginning with either the new or full moon.

January is known as the Wolf Moon. This has nothing to do with mythical werewolves. It came about because on cold January nights, packs of wolves are often heard. It was once thought wolves howled because they were hungry. However, wolves use howls to define their territory, locate members of their pack, and gather for hunting.

Head over to read the rest of this fascinating post about the legends of the full moons: Joan Hall with January The Wolf Moon and other legends

Robbie Cheadle, hosted by Kaye Lynne Booth, interviews fantasy author and poet Diana Wallace Peach about her favourite poems and the post also features a review by Robbie of Sunwielder.

Treasuring Poetry – Meet fantasy author and poet, Diana Peach and read my review of Sunwielder: An Epic Time Travel Adventure

 

Head over to find out more about Diana’s favourite poetry and her books: Treasury of Poetry – Diana Wallace Peach and a review of Sunwielder by Robbie Cheadle

Welcome to the first Treasury Poetry post of 2021.

Today, I am delighted to welcome fantasy author and poet, Diana Peach, who is sharing one of her own poems and discussing poetry.

Which of your own poems is your favourite?

Thanks so much for the invitation to participate in your Treasuring Poetry series, Robbie. I’m honored. I think of myself as a writer of prose and a dabbler otherwise, but I love poetry and believe no creative effort is ever wasted.

This is a super hard question! I have poems that I think are well-crafted, poems that evoke personal feelings or memories, and poems that reflect a particular time in my life. Since “I don’t know” isn’t an acceptable answer, I’ll go with this one:
Flight of faith

When I was a child, I could fly
you and I hopped in dirt-road afternoons
faithful
and the dust-wind flung us over seas of wheat
scuffed shoes skimming the feathered awns
we whipped around the corners of the barn
in a home-sewn world of farm-hewn hands
our secret futures soared.

Read the rest of the poem and enjoy the rest of the interview and review: Treasuring Poetry – D.Wallace Peach with Robbie Cheadle

The next post is the third in a series on Story Empire by John Howell and Gwen Plano on the complexities of co-authoring a book..very helpful if it is something you are planning to do in the future.

Unsplash Image KOBU Agency

Hi SE ers, The Last two posts on co-authorship covered the informal and formal elements needed for a successful co-authorship relationship and how to create a shared vision. If you missed them, you can go HERE and HERE. Today I am covering the subject of writing coherency.

Creating writing coherency (in other words making the story appear to have been written by one author) with two writers is critical. Without writing coherency, the book authored by two separate individuals will appear disjointed and confusing. Gwen and I were elated when a couple of our beta readers commented about the coherency of our story, saying that it was “seamless.” This was most encouraging. We worked towards writing coherency through three means.

1 Follow one character through the story: Our story is centered on a male character and a female character. Each of us wrote from the point of view of both characters. But once we completed the book, I took the male character, and Gwen took the female character and followed them through the entire book to ensure that the dialogue and descriptive material were consistent.

Head over to read the post in full as this series does provide a comprehensive guide to co-authorship: Story Empire, John Howell, Writing Coherency in co-authorship part three

 

Thanks for dropping in and I hope you will head over to enjoy these posts in full… thanks Sally.