Smorgasbord Summer Jazz 2017 – William Price King meets Tony Bennett – Part Two – The 1950s


Welcome to part two of the Tony Bennett story and we are now into the early 50s with Tony still only 24 years old. His talent as already come to the attention of influencers in the music industry such as Bob Hope and his first single and career is now on the fast track. I will hand you over to William to pick up the stories later in 1951.

51+CZFAIGjL._SS280

Following on from Tony Bennett’s first big hit Because of You, later in 1951 he released another single; a cover of Hank William’s Cold, Cold Heart bringing country to a much wider audience as it reached the top of the charts.. Mitch Miller and Percy Faith continued to work with the young singer as he hit the road on a concert tour including a seven show a day engagement at the Paramount Theater in New York. His legions of teenage fans packed the theater from 10.30 in the morning for the first show and certainly helped propel his next hit Blue Velvet into the charts.

Blue Velvet was written in 1950 by Bernie Wayne and Lee Morris and was first recorded by Tony Bennett in 1951. Uploaded by wilown01

In 1952 Columbia released Tony’s first Album Because Of You which included his first hit single and included Cold, Cold Heart. Other tracks included The Valentino Tango, While We Were Young and Boulevard of Broken Dreams.

In 1953 there was another number one hit with Rags to Riches which had a different style that Tony’s previous tracks. It was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross a partnership that would later bring The Pyjama Game to Broadway in 1954. Rags to Riches was an upbeat big band number backed by Percy Faith and his orchestra. It reached number one in the Billboard charts and stayed there for eight weeks becoming a gold record. Here it is uploaded by maumau1968

1953 continued to be a great year for Tony as he was approached by the producers of the new musical Kismet that took Broadway by storm that year. The musical, based on a 1911 play by Edward Knoblock, was collaboration between Robert Wright and George Forrest who adapted the music of Alexander Borodin alongside their original composition. The song Strangers in Paradise written by Wright and Forrest was recorded by Tony Bennett in 1953. It was to be Tony’s break into the UK charts as it went to number one following the move of Kismet to The Stoll Theater in London’s West End.

1954 saw a change in Tony Bennett’s musical production team with the appointment of jazz guitarist Chuck Wayne as his musical director for the next three years until 1957. Chuck Wayne had been a prominent part of the 1940s Jazz scene working with Woody Herman and was the first guitarist for the George Shearing Quintet. He was known for his distinctive bebop style that had been influenced by horn players such as Charlie Parker. He developed a Wayne developed an unusual legato technique, not widely adopted by others until decades later. He brought his experience of working with singers such as Sarah Vaughn and Frank Sinatra to the Bennett production team and in 1955 Tony’s next album Cloud 7 featuring Chuck Wayne was released with a distinct jazz element.

Cloud 7 was Tony Bennett’s first studio album and featured tracks from the Great American Songbook with a very different style from his early hits; with a jazz combo backing instead of full orchestration. The tracks included Old Devil Moon, Love Letters and My Baby Just Cares for Me written by Walter Donaldson and Gus Kahn in 1930. As you will hear this is very different from the early tracks featured in the post. Uploaded by Music Legends Book

The music evolution was now rolling into the rock and roll era from 1955 and many of the artists from the 40s who had founded their careers on jazz found themselves dropping in the charts. However, because of Tony Bennett’s diverse range of styles and his now growing fan base, he still continued to do well commercially. These included From the Candy Store on the Corner to the Chapel on the Hill at number 11 in the Top Twenty in 1955 – The Autumn Waltz at number 18 in 1956 and In the Middle of an Island at number 9 in 1957.

A new opportunity opened up for Tony in the summer of 1956 when he was asked to host the NBC Saturday night variety show. The Tony Bennett Show was the replacement for The Perry Como Show and cemented Tony’s popularity in America.

In 1957 Chuck Wayne left Tony’s musical production team and he was replaced by Ralph Sharon who took over as his pianist, arranger and musical director. This was the start of a 50 year collaboration and relationship that only ended in 2005 when Ralph retired from the concert tours.

Ralph Sharon was born in London in 1923 and immigrated to America in 1954 at 29 years old. As well as working with Tony Bennett on tour and on albums, Ralph discovered one of the most iconic songs of both the period and Tony Bennett’s career I Left my Heart in San Francisco which will feature in the post on the 60s next week.

With Ralph as his musical director the way forward was to continue with music that showcased Tony’s jazz inclinations and was commercial. This resulted in the 1957 album The Beat of my Heart. The backing featured well-known jazz musicians including Herbie Mann a jazz flautist who also played clarinet and tenor saxophone, percussionist Art Blakey and Jazz drummer and band leader Chico Hamilton. The tracks included Let There be Love, Lullaby of Broadway and Let’s Face the Music and Dance.

This was followed by a new working relationship when Tony Bennett became the first male pop vocalist to sing with the Count Basie Orchestra. They released the albums Live at the Latin Casino in Philadelphia with Count Basie, Strike up the Band and In Person! in 1959. Here is a track from In Person to finish our journey through the 1950s with Tony Bennett.

Chicago was written by Fred Fisher in 1922 and whilst Frank Sinatra made the song famous there is no doubt that Tony Bennett and Count Basie version is superb. Uploaded by Rubacuori1984’s channel

Buy the music of Tony Bennett: Amazon

Next week we head into the 1960s… Hope you will join us.

About William Price King.

pricestudio

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King

Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

You can find the other artists in the previous series here:

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-a-man-and-his-music-jazz-classical-and-contemporary-legends/

We would love to have your feedback and also your help in spreading the post around social media for us…we hope you will join us next week for part three of Tony Bennett’s story.

 

Summer Jazz with William Price King – Ella Fitzgerald – Part Four – Collaborations


William and his musicLast week in the Ella Fitzgerald story we discovered the delights of the eight Songbooks that Ella recorded up to 1964. This week a brief look at her appearances on the large and small screens and also her collaborations with some of the best performers of the day. My thanks as always to William Price King for his wonderful contribution to the blog and you will find links to his other articles at the end of the post.

Ella Fitzgerald was an exceptional performer and this did cross over into both television and film roles in the 50s. Her manager Norman Granz was able to negotiate a role for Ella in the Jack Webb 1955 jazz film Pete Kelly’s Blues alongside Janet Leigh and Peggy Lee. This was her first film since 1942 and Ella was thrilled by the opportunity.. Unfortunately the critics where not so thrilled with the film but despite this The New York Times did offer some comfort to Ella and her fans. “About five minutes (out of ninety-five) suggest the picture this might have been. Take the ingenious prologue … [or] take the fleeting scenes when the wonderful Ella Fitzgerald, allotted a few spoken lines, fills the screen and sound track with her strong mobile features and voice.”

At the time leading roles for African American actresses were difficult to find, but Ella appeared from time to time in cameos for St. Louis Blues in 1958 for example and on television in the 1980s drama The White Shadow.

However, she did make many guest performances with the established musical shows of the day including with one of her favourite singers Frank Sinatra. Also Andy Williams, Pat Boone, Nat King Cole, Dean Martin and Mel Tormé. She was a frequent guest on The Ed Sullivan Show and here is a wonderful, but unfortunately short, performance of “Three Little Maids from School” from The Mikado, alongside Joan Sutherland and Dinah Shore.

Ella was very popular with producers when it came to television commercials and one of her longest running was for Memorex tapes. Here is a short compilation to remind us not just of her amazing voice but also those days when we all thought that cassette tapes where the last word in technology! In the original advert Ella sang and shattered a glass, when the tape was played back the recording also broke the glass, asking: “Is it live, or is it Memorex?”

The Collaborations.

There is no doubt that Ella Fitzgerald performed and often recorded with the finest musicians and singers of the day. These included Bill Kenney & The Ink Spots, Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington.

Out of the seven songs that Ella recorded with the Ink Spots, four reached the top of the pop charts including “I’m Making Believe” for Decca Records in 1944. With hundreds of thousands of servicemen and women over in Europe this song was hugely popular and reached number one in the chart.

The three Verve Studio albums with Louis Armstrong also did very well including the last album that featured the music from the Gershwin musical Porgy and Bess. Ella also recorded with Louis on a number of records for Decca in the 50s.

Her collaboration with Count Basie pleased the critics and her 1963 album Ella and Basie! is considered to be one of the best. Here is one of the classics from the album “Ain’t Misbehavin’ ” written by Harry Brooks, Andy Razaf and Fats Waller

Ella and Count Basie also collaborated on the 1972 album Jazz at Santa Monica Civic ’72, and on the 1979 albums Digital III at Montreaux, A Classy Pair and A Perfect Match.

Last week we covered the Duke Ellington Songbook but Ella and the ‘Duke’ also worked together on the 1966 album Ella and Duke at the Cote D’Azur, and in Sweden for The Stockholm Concert 1966. Their 1965 album Ella at Duke’s Palace is also extremely well received. Here is a video of one of the live performances from Stockholm. “Let’s Do It (Let’s Fall in Love)”.

One of the stars that Ella would have dearly loved to collaborate with on an album was Frank Sinatra. Despite several memorable performances by them on stage and in television specials, that was never to happen. A great shame, although thankfully we do have recorded magic available on YouTube to share, including this wonderful performance of “Can’t we be friends”.

One of their most successful joint collaborations was with Count Basie in 1974 for a series of concerts at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas which was so popular and when they transferred to Broadway for two weeks in September 1975 the show grossed a million dollars in two weeks.

Join us next week for the final part of the amazing and wonderful life of Ella Fitzgerald with some more outstanding performances.

Buy Ella Fitzgerald music.
http://www.amazon.com/Ella-Fitzgerald/e/B000APP6OU

Additional sources
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ella_Fitzgerald
http://www.ellafitzgerald.com/
https://www.youtube.com
Marilyn Monroe Video Archives
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Granz

William Price King – Jazz composer, musician and singer.

williampriceking

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.
His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

LINKS
Links to website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

I hope that you have enjoyed and would love to receive your comments. Please feel free to reblog and share to others who love jazz and good music.

A Man and his Music – William Price King meets Quincy Jones Part Three


3144R59CnxL._UY250_

Still under thirty, Quincy Jones has been making a name for himself in the music industry as a soloist, composer and arranging music for some of the top stars in the business. Quincy had huge success on the silver screen and his work on the emerging television top shows was to follow.

For those of you who watched television in the 70s, the show Ironside was one of the most popular dramas on both sides of the Atlantic. Running from 1967 to 1975 its distinctive theme music is still very recognisable today. This was the first time that a theme song was synthesizer based.

Quincy also composed the theme tunes for Sanford and Son, and The Bill Cosby Show.

Behind the scenes Quincy was also beginning to make his mark as a social activist and was a firm supporter of Dr. Martin Luther King Jnr. In particular Operation Breadbasket which was aimed at promoting economic development in the inner cities. After Dr. King’s death in Memphis on April 4th 1968, Quincy served on the board of Reverend Jesse Jackson’s People United to Save Humanity.

In 1969 at age 36, he signed a contract as a recording artist with A&M records and won a Grammy for best jazz instrumental on his first album with the label, Walking in Space.

Whilst he may have been up there with the stars of the music industry, Quincy Jones was also on his way to the moon. In the July of 1969 his arrangement of Frank Sinatra’s recording of Fly Me to the Moon with the Count Basie orchestra was the first music played by Buzz Aldrin on the first lunar landing mission.

The Grammy nominations continued with Quincy being nominated in 1970 for Best Original Score for The Lost Man and MacKenna’s Gold, in 1971 for Best instrumental arrangement, composition and Jazz performance for the album Gula Matari. In 1972 Quincy was nominated and won the award for Best Pop Instrumental performance for the album Smackwater Jack.

In 1971 Quincy was the first African American to be named as musical director and conductor of the Academy Awards ceremony. This appointment illustrated the impact his promotion of appreciation of African-American music and culture was having on the industry. He helped establish the IBAM (Institute for Black American Music and proceeds from events were donated toward the establishment of the Annual Black Arts Festival in Chicago.

One of the major projects of the IBAM was the CBS television special co-produced by Quincy in 1973. Duke Ellington, We Love You Madly featured performers such as Aretha Franklin, Peggy Lee and Count Basie with Quincy Jones leading the 48 strong orchestra.

His next Grammy win was for the best instrumental arrangement for the track Summer In The City in 1973.

His career had been intense and also very exhausting and in 1973 Quincy decided to take a break from producing sound tracks for Hollywood and take explore a new direction in his music.

One of the areas that Quincy had not yet showcased his talent was as a vocalist, and in 1973 he debuted his voice on You’ve Got it Bad with Valerie Simpson. The song stayed at the top of the charts for most of the summer

The follow up album in 1974, Body Heat sold over a million copies, staying in the top five in the charts for over six months. Hit songs from the album included Everything Must Change and If I Ever Lose This Heaven.

This title was a little too prophetic as in the August of 1974 Quincy Jones at just 41 years old suffered a near-fatal cerebral aneurysm. Over the next six months he underwent two very delicate operations to repair the blood vessels in his brain and recuperation.

Thankfully following this, Quincy was back at work and concluded his contract with A & M records with the albums Mellow Madness, I Heard That and The Dude.

Taking more control of his recording commitments was achieved by the founding of Qwest Productions in 1975. He continued to arrange and produce with singers such as Frank Sinatra and in 1977 wrote the score for the iconic mini-series Roots.

In 1978 he produced the soundtrack for The Wiz, the musical adaptation of The Wizard of Oz starring Michael Jackson and Diana Ross. Here is Everybody Rejoice to end this part of the Quincy Jones story and his return to full recovery.

BUY THE MOVIE: http://amzn.to/sBeUfl

My thanks to those who have uploaded videos to YouTube.

Buy Quincy Jones Music.

http://www.amazon.com/Quincy-Jones/e/B000AQ0MV6

Sources and information on tours and news for Quincy Jones.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quincy_Jones
http://www.biography.com/people/quincy-jones-9357524
http://www.quincyjones.com/

Next time… Quincy Jones and the 1980s

About William Price King

cover of Home by William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His debut jazz album is called ‘Home,’ a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area. His album ‘Home’ is available to download and he is currently working on his new album available later in 2015.

LINKS
Links to website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find the previous post for Quincy Jones and the other series including Nat King Cole, Mel Torme, Roberta Flack, Nina Simone, Ella Fitzgerald and Sir George Shearing in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king/

We both would be very appreciative if you could leave a comment and share this new series on social media – Twitter and FB in particular. Many thanks Sally and William.

 

New Series – A Man and his Music – William Price King meets Quincy Jones – Part One


Welcome to the new series by William Price King on the life and music of Quincy Jones.

Before we take a look at his life and music perhaps I could just briefly cover some of his lifetime achievements. This extraordinary man has not just been awarded the accolades heaped upon him by the music industry but has given back to the business, its artists and to those outside of music who have needed his help.

Despite being centre stage as a performer, Quincy Jones has excelled in most of the areas of popular music for over 65 years. He is a record producer, conductor, arranger, composer, musician, television producer, film producer, instrumentalist, magazine founder, entertainment company executive, children’s activist and humanitarian

He has received 79 Grammy nominations and 27 Grammy Awards. He was nominated for 7 Oscar Academy awards and he received The Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1994. He has composed sound tracks for movies from the early 60s including for The Slender Thread, In The Heat of the Night, MacKenna’s Gold, The Italian Job and They Call Me Mr. Tibbs.

Here is the theme song from the soundtrack of The Colour Purple in 1985, although his own album is available here is the version by Itzhak Perlman on his album Perlman. You can buy the original soundtrack at the link at the end of the post.

Quincy has collaborated with the best in the business including Frank Sinatra, Michael Jackson and Celine Dion. He has also invested time and funding to provide young musicians the opportunity to develop their own careers through education and community outreach.

In 2008, Quincy Jones was inducted into the California Hall of Fame and in 2009 made a Fellow of the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. Later that year he was honoured with a Clinton Global Citizen award for Leadership in Philanthropy. In 2013 he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and honoured in 1014 by the French by being made Commandeur de L’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and is the first musician also be made Commandeur de la Legion d’Honneur.

Away from music he has devoted much of his life to social change and philanthropy.

In May 2000 the Quincy Jones Professorship of African American Music was established at Harvard University in Massachusetts with a grant of $3 million from Time Warner. In January 2001 he received the first Ted Arison Award from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts, named for the man who created the organization.

He is founder of the Quincy Jones Listen Up Foundation which is a non-profit organisation that has built more than 100 homes in South Africa with an aim to connecting young people with technology, education, culture and music. In 2004 he helped launch the We Are the Future project, which gives children in poor and conflict-ridden areas a chance to live their childhoods and develop with a sense of hope.

In 2001, Jones became an honorary member of the board of directors of The Jazz Foundation of America. He has worked with The Jazz Foundation to save the homes and the lives of America’s elderly jazz and blues musicians, including those who survived Hurricane Katrina.

Quincy Jones is saluted at the 2001 Kennedy Center Honors by Stevie Wonder, Patti Austin and James Ingram. However, the star of the performance is the legendary Ray Charles who sings the old World War I song “My Buddy” – and makes it his own tribute to Quincy. Thanks to Henry B Walthall for uploading this video to Youtube.

Jones and his friend John Sie, founder of Liberty Starz, worked together to create the Global Down Syndrome Foundation.

In this first post I just want to touch on his early life as that is already well documented in Q: The Autobiography of Quincy Jones which won a Grammy in the best spoken word album category.

You can buy his autobiography and his other books from his author’s site on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Quincy-Jones/e/B001HD1UDA

Quincy’s early influences.

Born in 1933 on the South Side of Chicago as Quincy Delight Jones Jnr. to Sarah and Quincy Delight Jones snr, he was to get an early introduction to music by his mother who sang religious songs. He was also lucky enough to be able to hear a neighbour Lucy Jackson playing her stride piano (jazz piano style that was developed in the large cities of the East Coast, mainly New York, during the 1920s and 1930s) through the walls of their adjoining houses. Listening to the music was not enough and so Quincy would head next door and began his musical career in earnest.

Unfortunately his mother Sarah suffered a breakdown when Quincy and his brother were very young and she was institutionalised. His father eventually remarried to Elvera who had three children with another three arriving in following years after moving to the Northwest.

Quincy attended Garfield High School in Seattle and developed his early love of music by studying the trumpet and music composition and arranging. He met a new classmate, Charles Taylor whose mother was Evelyn Bundy, one of Seattle’s first jazz-band leaders. This opened up doors for Quincy and at fourteen, he and Charles were playing in the National Reserve Band.

This was also the age when he met Ray Charles who was then himself only 16 years old. After watching Ray perform, Quincy introduced himself and considers him to be an early inspiration for his own career. Combined with a strong and empowering family environment and an inherited work ethic from his father, Quincy was now set on his future in music.

A great track from the Quincy Jones album “Back on the Block” released in 1989. Performed by Ray Charles and Chaka Khan. I’ll Be Good To You.

At eighteen Quincy won a scholarship to Seattle University along with another star in the making, Clint Eastwood. After the first semester however, Quincy transferred to the Berklee College of Music in Boston on another scholarship. The course work was tough and Quincy was studying 10 subjects related to performing, arranging and composing. To cover his expenses he played at what he terms ‘a real dive’ locally called Izzy Ort’s Bar & Grille where he was influenced by alto player Bunny Campbell and pianist and arranger Preston Sandiford.

His studies came to an end when he was offered the practical experience of touring as a trumpeter with the legendary Lionel Hampton. Lionel was a jazz pianist, percussionist, actor and bandleader and had worked with the best including Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman and Charlie Parker. This was a great start to Quincy’s professional career and it also offered him the opportunity to demonstrate his talent for arranging songs. This lead to him moving to New York where he worked freelance arranging songs for artists such as Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Sarah Vaughn and his old and now close friend Ray Charles.

Frank Sinatra sings I Only Have Eyes For You with the Count Basie Orchestra directed by Quincy Jones. Count Basie on the piano. Uploaded by VicoKrav

Buy Quincy Jones Music.

http://www.amazon.com/Quincy-Jones/e/B000AQ0MV6

The Soundtrack The Colour Purple

http://www.amazon.com/Color-Purple-The-CD-Reissue/dp/B000A2H8Z8/ref=ntt_mus_ep_dpi_12

Sources and information on tours and news for Quincy Jones.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quincy_Jones
http://www.biography.com/people/quincy-jones-9357524
http://www.quincyjones.com/

About William Price King

cover of Home by William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His debut jazz album is called ‘Home,’ a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area. His album ‘Home’ is available to download and he is currently working on his new album available later in 2015.

LINKS
Links to website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find the other series including Nat King Cole, Mel Torme, Roberta Flack, Nina Simone, Ella Fitzgerald and Sir George Shearing in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king/

We both would be very appreciative if you could leave a comment and share this new series on social media – Twitter and FB in particular. Many thanks Sally and William.