Smorgasbord Health Column – A – Z of Common Conditions – Allergies and Intolerances – #Dairy #Leaky Gut


Last week I covered the differences between an allergy and an intolerance and also at some of the more common triggers for anaphylaxis.

This week a look at dairy which does have many nutrients that the body needs, and for most of us… there is no problem in eating moderately (too much cheese and butter, whilst good for you, can put weight on).

The subject of eating fat has had us all going around in circles for years. One minute you need to dump it all and the next it is poor carbohydrates on the chopping block. I have written a number of posts on the subject. Unhealthy fats: Industrially produced fats and Healthy Fats: Essential Fatty Acids and Good fats

Milk Allergy

Milk or Dairy Allergy is surprisingly common but there is some confusion over milk allergy and lactose intolerance.

A dairy allergy is an immune response that results in inflammation and tissue damage and it can be exhibited in any part of the body causing a wide range of problems. It is an immune response to the protein, Casein, in Cow dairy products that the body perceives as a threat. It is very rare for there to be the same reaction to the protein found in Goat’s milk which is a different protein. It is usually a genetic problem passed down through the family. If someone is reacting to both the casein in cow’s milk and the different protein in Goat’s milk then it is more likely to be leaky gut syndrome where inappropriate proteins are escaping into the bloodstream and causing an allergic reaction. I go into more detail about leaky gut later but here are the protein specifics for cows and goats.

The difference between cow and goat casein profiles

Apha-s1 is the major casein protein present in cow milk and has been identified as one of the major cow milk allergens. By contrast the major casein in goat milk is ß-casein, and alpha-s2 casein is the main alpha casein present. Goat’s milk contains only trace amounts of an allergenic casein protein, alpha-S1, found in cow’s milk. Goat’s milk casein is more similar to human milk.

The most common symptoms associated with a Milk Allergy in babies are also very serious as they can include the anaphylaxis (severe allergic reaction) which is life threatening and has a very rapid onset. However all new mothers should be aware of the inability to thrive, constant crying, vomiting, wheezing, rashes and stomach upsets.

In children ear infections are very common – the reason being that the Eustachian tube which opens into the back of the throat is not fully developed in children and is easily blocked by mucus which provides a warm breeding ground for bacteria. The inflammation of the tube is usually caused by an allergy – most often dairy as this is usually the first foods after breast feeding or formula that a child will eat and drink.

There are a number of tests available to confirm milk allergy.

In adults these are the likely symptoms: sinusitis, heartburn/reflux, constipation, diarrhoea and irritable bowel syndrome.

Some others are as follows: Abdominal Pain – Acne – Anxiety – Arthritis – Cold Sores – Fibromyalgia – Gas Headaches – Heartburn – Indigestion – Iron deficient anaemia – Irritability – Joint Pain – Lactose intolerance – Osteoporosis – Poor immune function.

Dairy allergy relates to all types of milk from a cow, cheese, butter, yogurt, cottage cheese, ice cream – it also includes anything else which contains the protein casein such as whey and lactalbumin which are unfortunately found in many processed foods. If you suffer from these symptoms and use industrialised foods you need to read the labels very carefully.

Lactose Intolerance

Lactose intolerance is in fact an enzyme deficiency not an allergy – however lactose intolerance can be the result of a dairy allergy.

Lactase is the enzyme that digests the milk sugar lactose. People with lactose intolerance usually experience an upset stomach, bloating, gas and loose stools. Unfortunately these also mirror symptoms of milk allergy.

If someone has a milk allergy, damage can occur to the digestive tract which inhibits the production of the enzyme lactase therefore adding the lactose intolerance to the list of symptoms.

Milk allergy is estimated to affect 2% of infants and young children in the UK. That percentage decreases as the child ages and it rare to find onset after 12 months. Breastfeeding reduces the risk significantly. Usually 9 out of 10 sufferers will grow out of the allergy by age three. Obviously 1 in 10 children do not outgrow it and these are the children most likely to pass on the response to their own children.

This means that it is only likely to persist in those with a strong family history of allergies especially to other food allergies such as eggs, soya, peanuts or citrus fruits.

If someone is experiencing a severe allergic reaction to a particular food you are likely to see the following: Skin problems such as eczema and dermatitis, gastro problems such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. Breathing problems such as wheezing, coughing, rhinitis, asthma.

Leaky Gut syndrome

In a normal healthy person the small intestine acts like a sieve only permitting the breakdown products of the digestion into the bloodstream. These include the obvious nutrients but also fats, proteins and starches – all of which are very well digested and the larger molecules such as bacterium and toxins are excluded.

As part of this process, Villi, which are finger like projections from the wall of the intestinal tract with even smaller hair like extensions called microvilli, serve as a point of absorption for nutrients. The essential nutrients that the body needs such as glucose, amino acids are carried through the microvilli into the cells of the villus via a transport system comprised of carrier molecules.

If someone is suffering from a leaky gut the intestinal lining has become inflamed and the microvilli become damaged. They cannot then produce the necessary enzymes and secretions necessary for the absorption of nutrients.

Normally there is a strong wall of cells which prevents the larger molecules containing bacteria and toxins to pass through, however when there is an area of inflammation this structure becomes weakened and these harmful molecules can pass through into the bloodstream. This provokes an automatic response from the immune system which produces antibodies (proteins that locate and attack foreign objects as they are seen as antigens).

If this was a one off, the body would cope with the invasion and the gut would return to normal, but if the intestinal wall is damaged and the process is on-going then the immune system is unable to control the leakage of toxins and they begin to leak back into the liver causing that organ to become stressed and overburdened.

The liver

I have featured The liver in a previous post but here is a little reminder of how important this organ is in relation to our digestive process and the way we react to the food we eat…

It is the largest gland in the body and plays a really important part in detoxification as well as having many other functions including: producing bile, containing bile acids, which aid digestion, filtering out toxins, such as drugs, alcohol and environmental toxins, storing glucose as glycogen, then breaking it down about 4 hours after a meal to be converted to glucose to regulate blood sugar levels, converting ammonia to urea and removing damaged red blood cells.

Leaky Gut completely overworks the liver because it floods it with additional toxins diminishing the liver’s ability to neutralise chemical substances. When it cannot cope with the level of toxins the liver expels them back into the bloodstream. The circulatory system then pushes the toxins into the connective tissues and muscles where the body stores them to prevent major organ damage. The liver doesn’t get the time to go back and rid the body of the toxins.

You then have a build-up of toxins in the tissues and major organs leading to inflammation and all the symptoms associated with allergic reactions. Including those of milk allergy and lactose intolerance.

In fact the person suffering from leaky gut usually test positive for a great many allergies, not because they are allergic to a specific substance or food but because their immune system is in overdrive – this leads to the chronic forms of conditions such as arthritis and asthma.

The biggest problem is that therapists and doctors will begin to remove essential foods and nutrients from the diet to try and overcome this massive reaction when in fact they should be treating the root cause which may be something that is the root cause – Candida Albicans. Starving the body of a broad spectrum of nutrients is not the answer, starving the Candida is.

©sally cronin Just Food for Health 1998 – 2018

A little bit about me nutritionally.

I am a qualified nutritional therapist with twenty years experience working with clients in Ireland and the UK as well as being a health consultant on radio in Spain. Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 20 years ago, based on my own weight loss of 154lbs. My first clinic was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Since then I have written a men’s health manual, and anti-aging programme, articles for magazines and posts here on Smorgasbord.

If you would like to browse by health books and fiction you can find them here: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/my-books-and-reviews-2018/

 If you have any questions then please do not hesitate to ask in the comments.. or if you prefer send in an email to sally.cronin@moyhill.com

 

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Smorgasbord Health – IBS Part Three – Identifying Trigger Foods


This is the process that I used successfully for myself originally 20 years ago and also with my clients since then.. It may seem a real pain to keep a food diary and to pay so much attention to what you are eating, but it will pay off when you have either reduced your IBS symptoms or discovered the cause of the disease.

Intermittent Fasting.

In the last couple of years there has been a lot of press about Intermittent Fasting. The theory behind the concept is that by restricting your eating to within certain time periods that it gives your body a chance to process your food efficiently and also to rest the major organs active in the digestive system.

There are a couple of choices. You can have two days a week where you only have 500 calories during the day with fluids and then you eat normally for five days (by normally I do mean a balanced diet). Or you can do what I do and that is eating within an 8 hour window every day.

I have lost weight, regained my appetite, and I have lost my sugar cravings. This of course does not mean you have a free licence to eat anything you like.. But you can still have a pizza or a night out once or twice a week provided the rest of the time you are eating with Cook From Scratch firmly in place.

As to IBS symptoms.. After a year I can now have the occasional home baked or fresh made bread from the in house bakery in the store once or twice a week. I enjoy a glass of wine or gin and tonic at the weekend and I can enjoy most things as long as it is not a regular feature.

Stress

As I pointed out in the other posts on IBS, stress has been recognised as a contributory factor in the condition.  When you are keeping your food diary it is important to also make a note of out of the ordinary events or activities that resulted in an increase in symptoms.

Programme to identify your food triggers that result in IBS symptoms.

WEEK ONE – The aim is to reduce inflammation and cramps and increase intestinal flora.

Grains are all out for the first week. You will be getting sufficient carbohydrates from vegetables and fruit. You will start to re-introduce from week two, one grain at a time.

Dairy is out for the first week – you will introduce butter week two, milk week three and cheese week four. Calcium will come from vegetables, canned fish etc. If you can abide the taste of organic soymilk then fine but make sure no added sugar!  If you have symptoms after using a dairy alternative stop taking.

No alcohol for six weeks or any other processed packets, cans or bottles of sauces of any kind including mayonnaise.

One coffee per day in the morning but note any intestinal symptoms 30 – 60 minutes after eating. The oil content in caffeinated coffee can cause diarrhoea so try decaffeinated. Tea – black without milk – Green tea – very good and peppermint tea – great for spasms and cramps.

FOOD YOU CAN EAT WEEK ONE.

Vegetables – for first week or two avoid cabbage or cauliflower as nutritious but can increase wind. At least five a day of spinach, broccoli, watercress, Rucula lettuce, courgettes, leeks, onions, (every day) mushrooms (shitake are excellent) garlic (fresh if possible) carrots, parsnips, swede, potatoes, butternut squash (carbohydrates), tomatoes, (see how you feel the next day as pips in tomatoes can cause a problem if you suffer from diverticulitis), red peppers, peeled cucumber, half an avocado per day. Flavour with a little olive oil and herbs or spices. Balsamic vinegar with some olive oil and herbs makes a good salad dressing.

Fruit –At least two per day – bananas (helps both diarrhoea and constipation) oranges, lemons, apples, pears, grapes, berries of all kinds, plums, melon. Avoid dried fruit in week one.

Meat and poultry – any unprocessed Lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, beef, and duck. Eggs any way you wish. If you are not using milk you can still make scrambled egg and omelettes by whisking the whites first. Use the microwave or a pan with a little olive oil.

Fish – at least three times a week. –Salmon fresh and canned (mash the soft bones in for added calcium) tuna, sardines, halibut and any other fish. Give shelled fish such as prawns, crab and lobster a miss for week one and two and then introduce one a week.

Oils – Standard Olive oil or sunflower for all cooking and extra virgin olive oil for dressings – mix with herbs and spices like garlic to drizzle over jacket potatoes and salad. Do not fry with olive oil alone, add some sunflower oil and do not burn.

Examples of meals.

Breakfast. Water on rising or juice of a lemon in hot water – leave at least 30 minutes before eating if you can.

Spanish omelette with two eggs, chopped potatoes, tomatoes and onion (chop the night before and keep in fridge)

Fruit salad with fresh pressed juice on top.

Poached egg on spinach with half an avocado.

Lunchtime

Homemade vegetable soup – no stock but you can add seasoning and salt. For example butternut squash and carrot – if you can find a fresh made soup without sugar and preservatives then go for it.

Large salad with egg, avocado tinned salmon or sardines with chopped potato and balsamic dressing.

Jacket potato with drizzle of olive oil and a tin of tuna or salmon.

Dinner

Meat, fish or chicken all fresh – green vegetables – carrots and potatoes – use olive oil and herbs and spices over the vegetables.

Snacks between meals.

Fruit, nuts and seeds.

If at the end of week one you are still experiencing severe symptoms drop the fruit and repeat week one.

WEEK TWO – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS

You can introduce oats every other day – porridge with a banana and a small cup of whole milk. You can also put a dash of milk in your tea and coffee. No more than 250ml per day. If you symptoms worsen drop the milk and stay with the oats.

WEEK THREE – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS

You can introduce corn and brown rice – corn tortillas and substitute every other meal with two tablespoons of brown rice.

You can also start to use some butter to drizzle over vegetables etc.

WEEK FOUR – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS.

Cabbage, Brussel sprouts, cauliflower (check for increase in symptoms). Also a couple of ounces of cheese every other day.

You can introduce rye – Ryvita will add some variety to snacks and lunches.

WEEK FIVE – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS

You can introduce wheat again – try reduced sugar Irish soda bread – one slice per day. It is at this point that you want to pay particular attention to your symptoms over 48 hours. If you notice an increase you are probably gluten intolerant which means that certainly for the conceivable future you need to only eat gluten free products. Gluten is not just in bread of course, it is in many processed foods and meats such as sausages and in sauces.

You can have good quality yoghurt every other day. Note any increase in symptoms.

WEEK SIX – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS

You can introduce whole grain pasta – make simple sauces from scratch like tomato and basil etc.

You can have a glass of red wine three days apart – watch for increase in symptoms.

By now you should be very aware of how your body and more importantly your intestines are reacting to the food you are eating. This is not a weight loss exercise although those who are overweight will lose some but those who have been starving themselves out of desperation will put it on.

As I mentioned earlier – you can extend each phase to two weeks. The key is to make sure that you keep an accurate record of both food intake and symptoms.

SUPPLEMENTS.

There is a huge debate as to the effectiveness of supplements. You should be now getting most of which you need to obtain the necessary nutrients but there are a few that I find very useful in speeding up the process.

Peppermint capsules Peppermint tea is great an hour after you have eaten, but I find that two peppermint capsules after breakfast help with cramps and digestion in general. However, in some people peppermint can cause symptoms so note any of these. Also be careful of over the counter IBS medication as they nearly all have peppermint.

Acidophilus capsules at least 3billion active cultures. This helps give your intestinal bacteria a kick start. They are quite expensive and good quality is vital. Take as directed but I have found that 2 per day to start with, after breakfast and dinner are helpful. You can drop this to one a day after a period of time. (see Part Two that tells you which foods are high in natural probiotics)

Aloe Vera gel this is highly nutritious and provided you begin slowly you may find it will help with symptoms, reduce the cramping and give you a boost. I start with a teaspoon a day before breakfast and graduate up to a dessert spoon twice a day over a two week period. After that you can increase to the recommended dosage on the product. I take through the winter months as I find it a great help when I am not getting any sunshine. You should be able to find a local agent but most have online shops who supply Forever Living which is about the best quality.

Multi-vitamin supplement-If you are suffering from a basic nutritional deficiency then do go to one of the larger health food chains and ask their advice regarding the best multi-vitamin that they have. You want one that is yeast and sugar free and liquid might be best to get you started rather than demand your overworked intestines try to process anything else. The liquid will also be absorbed faster and easier.  As I get older and particularly through the winter months I find that taking a B-complex supplement helps me.

So those are the basics.

Six to twelve weeks to perhaps discover the one or two foods that might be the cause of all your misery. A time to rest your digestive system and encourage your healthy bacteria in your gut and also stimulate the natural muscular activity to restart.

I hope that you will find that this is not a starvation programme but one that you can enjoy, experiment with and learn how what you eat does impact your health.

Having improved your symptoms – you may well have to make minor adjustments going forward – it might be gluten free – sugar reduced – dairy alternatives – but all are worth the price if you are free of symptoms and stress. If there are foods that will always cause you a problem you will find that there are many that will not. A small sacrifice to have the freedom from the symptoms of IBS.

On that note, as you begin to feel better and have the urge to exercise, find something that enables you to relax and be calm – leave the marathon running and the extreme sports for a while!

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to comment here or contact me privately through my About Me on the blog.

Here are Part One and Part Two of the series.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2015/04/28/smorgasbord-health-irritable-bowel-syndrome-stop-and-rewind/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2015/04/29/smorgasbord-health-irritable-bowel-syndrome-part-two-strategies/