Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Music Column – The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 1968 – Part Two


Each week William and I will select two top hits from the charts starting with 1960 for two weeks followed by 1961 etc..through to 1985. We will also include some of the notable events in those years for the up and coming stars who were centre stage at the time.

Every four weeks at the weekend there will be a spin-off show where we will feature four guests sharing their memories of the music of a particular decade we are working on. An opportunity to share your work and your can find the details: The Breakfast Show 2021

Welcome to our show and we are excited to share decades of music with you in 2021. Here is my second selection of  top 1968 hits which I hope you will enjoy.  William.

News Event: June 8th Rolling Stones release “Jumpin’ Jack Flash”

Jose Feliciano – Light my Fire

“Light my fire” quickly became a Top10 hit around the world and is ranked #35 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Jose Feliciano won two Grammy Awards for his cover of this song, one for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance and Best New Artist.

New Event:  September 28th Janis Joplin announces she’s leaving “Big Brother & Holding Co”

Dionne Warwick – Do you know the way to San Jose

“Do you know the way to San Jose” was Warwick’s biggest international hit to date, topping the charts and selling over 3,500,000 copies worldwide. She won her first Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

News Event:  November 9th Joe Cocker’s version of The Beatles single “With a Little Help From My Friends” becomes No. 1 single in the UK

Now time for my first top chart picks from 1968 and they bring back memories of my teenage years as if it was yesterday.

Herb Albert – This Guys in Love With You.

Herb Albert recorded five No. 1 albums and 28 albums on the Billboard magazine album chart, fourteen platinum albums, fifteen gold albums, and nine Grammy Awards. He has sold 72 million records worldwide. Alpert is the only musician to hit No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop chart as both a vocalist (“This Guy’s in Love with You”, 1968) and an instrumentalist (“Rise”, 1979). Herb Alpert

New Event:  November 20th 2nd Country Music Association Award: Glen Campbell and Tammy Wynette win

The Equals – Baby, Come Back

“Baby, Come Back” was first released in 1966, a year after the band formed, but did not chart. However, after impressive sales in the rest of Europe (it reached the top 10 in Belgium and the Netherlands, the song was re-issued in the UK on 1 May 1968 and reached #1 in the UK Singles Chart on 3 July 1968 spending three weeks there. In all the song stayed in the UK Top 75 for 18 weeks. It also charted at number 32 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Additional sources: On This Day – Music – Hits of the 60s: Sixties City – Wikipedia

Your Hosts for The Breakfast Show

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

Blog– IMPROVISATION William Price King on Tumblr – Buy William’s music: William Price King iTunes – FacebookWilliam Price King – Twitter@wpkofficial
Regular VenueCave Wilson

Sally Cronin is an author, blogger and broadcaster who enjoyed four years as part of the team on Onda Cero International’s English speaking morning show in Marbella and then for two years as a presenter on Expressfm the local radio station in Portsmouth. She co-presented two ‘Drive Time’ shows a week with Adrian Knight, hosted the live Thursday Afternoon Show and The Sunday Morning Show guests including musicians and authors. Following this she became Station Director for a local internet television station for two years, producing and presenting the daily news segment, outside broadcasts and co-presenting the Adrian and Sally chat show live on Friday evenings.

She and her husband David have now returned to Ireland where they live on the Wexford Coast where she blogs and continues to write books.

Books :Amazon US – And: Amazon UK – More reviews: Goodreads – blogSmorgasbord Blog Magazine Twitter: @sgc58 – Facebook: Sally Cronin – LinkedIn: Sally Cronin

Thank you very much for joining us today and we would love you to join us in the spin off shows where we share your memories of the 1960s and your favourite music.. please read how you can take part: The Breakfast Show 2021

 

Next week 1969 Part One. We hope you will tune in.. as always we love to hear from you.. thanks William and Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Music Column with William Price King – Johnny Mathis up to date.


Welcome to part three of the Johnny Mathis story… Born in Gilmer in East Texas in 1935, Johnny Mathis, with his distinctive voice would become one of the most popular and enduring singers of the last 60 years.

Johnny Mathis has been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame for three separate recordings – in 1998 for “Chances Are”, in 2002 for “Misty”, and in 2008 for “It’s Not for Me to Say.”

On June 21, 2014, Mathis was inducted into the Great American Songbook Hall Of Fame along with Linda Ronstadt, Shirley Jones, and Nat King Cole (his daughter Natalie Cole accepting the award on his behalf). The awards were presented by the Center for the Performing Arts artistic director Michael Feinstein. Defined on their website, “Conceived as an enduring testament to the Great American Songbook, the Hall of Fame honors performers and composers responsible for creating America’s soundtrack.”

He was awarded the Society of Singers Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006 and he was inducted into the Hit Parade Hall of Fame.

I will now hand over to William Price King to bring the Johnny Mathis story up to the present day.

The end of the 1970s was a productive and successful period for Johnny Mathis. In 1978, his hit duet “The Last Time I Felt Like This” from the film “Same Time, Next Year” was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. Mathis and Jane Olivor sang the song at the Academy Awards ceremony, in his second performance at the Oscars.

“Too Much, Too Little, Too late” was penned by songwriters Nat Kipner and John Vallins. Johnny Mathis struck gold when he teamed up with R&B songbird Deniece Williams for this 1978 chart-topper. The song is about a couple who finally realize that there’s no spark left in their relationship and decide to go their separate ways. Mathis and Williams’ voices complement one another nicely on this bittersweet break-up ballad. The duet was born out of Mathis’ desire to take his music in a new direction. The single was a comeback of sorts for Mathis, as it was his first chart-topping hit in the US since 1957’s “Chances Are.” Released as a single in 1978, it reached #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 pop chart, Adult Contemporary chart, and R&B chart. Outside the US, the song peaked at # 9 on the Canadian Singles Chart and #3 on the UK Singles Chart and was certified gold and silver in the US and in the UK.

The duo released a follow-up duet, “You’re All I Need to Get By,” peaking at number 47 on the Hot 100. The success of the duets with Williams prompted Mathis to record duets with a variety of partners, including Dionne Warwick, Natalie Cole, Gladys Knight, Jane Olivor, Stephanie Lawrence, and Nana Mouskouri. A compilation album also called “Too Much, Too Little, Too Late” released by Sony Music in 1995, featured the title track among other songs by Mathis and Williams.

“Friends in Love” was released in April 1982 by Columbia Records and included six original songs, two of which were duets with Dionne Warwick. The album made its first appearance on Billboard magazine’s Top LPs & Tapes chart in May, 1982, and remained there for nine weeks, peaking at #147. It also made it to #34 during a seven-week run on the UK album chart that began the following week.

The title track from the album entered the Billboard Hot 100 in April, 1982, and eventually got as high as #38 over the course of 13 weeks. That same issue included its debut on the magazine’s list of the 100 most popular R&B songs in the US, where it also spent 13 weeks and peaked at #22. The next issue, in April 24, marked its first appearance on the

Adult Contemporary chart, and during its 17-week run there it rose to #5.
This was the first Mathis album whose initial release included the compact disc (CD) format.

Mathis continued to release and sell albums throughout the ’90s — his fifth decade of recording for Columbia. He was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1991 for Best Traditional Pop Performance for the album “In A Sentimental Mood: Mathis Sings Ellington.”

“Unbreak my Heart” is the from 1998 album “Because You Love Me: The Songs of Diane Warren” on which he covers 10 of the songwriter’s hits. This song was also chosen for the compilation of Mathis’ hits on his 2004 album “The Essential Johnny Mathis.” Diane Warren wrote “Un-Break My Heart” in 1995. When asked about her songwriting process, she said that songs usually come to her from a title, a chorus, or a drum beat. “Un-Break My Heart” was conceived from its title, and, according to Warren, “it popped into my head, and I thought, ‘I don’t think I’ve heard that before, that’s kind of interesting. I started playing around on the piano with these chords and did a key change, and then I knew, ‘OK, this is magic.’ Warren further explained that she wrote “Un-Break My Heart” as a ballad and dance song, because that was the way she heard it.

“Over the Rainbow,” the tenth song from the album, “Isn’t It Romantic: The Standards Album,” is a duet with Ray Charles that originally appeared on the late musician’s final release, “Genius Loves Company” in 2004, and won the Grammy Award for “Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalists” for its arranger Victor Vanacore. Mathis received a Grammy nomination for this album in the category of Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album. In an interview that year with National Public Radio’s Ed Gordon, Mathis describes a conversation he had with record company executives: “They said, ‘We want you to sing the most popular songs from the American musical theater that you haven’t sung in the past.”… I sat down and finally came up with a list of nine songs that I hadn’t recorded that were very familiar to the public.”

John Bush of “AllMusic” noted that “singers from a variety of genres had jumped on the standards bandwagon” around this time due in large part to the success that Rod Stewart was having with his series of “Great American Songbook” albums. “There are a few qualities, however, that separate Mathis from the competition. His long mastery of singing love songs is one, and his comprehensive knowledge of the pop canon is another (the last would be, of course, that wonderful voice).” He also wrote, “His choices for the material on “Isn’t It Romantic” are excellent, all of them natural fits for both his voice and his persona.”

2006 was a very busy year for Johnny, marking his impressive 50th anniversary as a recording star. “Johnny Mathis – Gold: A 50th Anniversary Celebration” and “A 50th Christmas Celebration” were both released and PBS taped a special called “Wonderful, Wonderful”.  2006 also marked the year that he was honored with receiving the Society of Singers coveted Ella Award.

Mathis returned to the British Top 30 album chart in 2007 with the Sony BMG release “The Very Best of Johnny Mathis” in 2008 with the CD “A Night to Remember” and again in 2011 with “The Ultimate Collection.”

“Let It Be Me: Mathis in Nashville” was released in 2010, by Columbia Records and focused upon popular country songs. With the exceptions of the traditional folk song “Shenandoah” and George Strait’s “We Must Be Lovin’ Right” from 1993, the heyday of the selections that Mathis is covering coincided approximately with the first 20 years of his career, starting with Elvis Presley’s “Love Me Tender” from 1956.

The album earned Mathis a Grammy Award nomination for “Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album.

“Location matters little to Johnny Mathis,” writes Stephen Thomas Erlewine of “Allmusic” — “wherever he goes, there he is, sounding as smooth as ever. That’s quite an accomplishment for a singer of 74, to still make it all seem effortless.” He also notes that, with a few exceptions, the album “sounds as if it could have easily been released in the early ‘60s when Mathis was a regular fixture in the charts…, and that’s its strength.” He concludes that “Mathis sounds as silky as his surroundings,” and asserts that “that may be because he wound up having Nashville accept his terms instead of bending to the rules of the Music City.”

“Once Before I Go,” featured on “Johnny Mathis Sings the Great New American Songbook” is from the “Boy from Oz” – a jukebox musical based on the life of singer/songwriter Peter Allen highlighting songs written by him. The book is by Nick Enright. Premiering in Australia in 1998 starring Todd McKenney, the musical opened in a revised version on Broadway in 2003 with Hugh Jackman in the title role and co-starring Isabel Keating.

Jackman won the 2004 Tony Award for Best Leading Actor in a Musical and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Musical, and Keating won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical. The show also received nominations for four other Tony Awards, including Best Musical.

Buy the music of Johnny Mathis: https://www.amazon.com/Johnny-Mathis/e/B000APEDOO

Find out more about Johnny Mathis and current news: http://www.johnnymathis.com/news.html

Additional sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Mathis

My thanks to William Price King for another wonderful series that shares the music of artists whose music has usually accompanied most of the major events in our lives.

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo called “Clear Cut,” and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Connect with William

Websitehttp://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/wpkofficial
Regular Venuehttp://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find previous artists featured in these two links

Jazz, Classical and Contemporary: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-a-man-and-his-music-jazz-contemporary-classical-and-legends/

And the Music Column: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-music-column/

Thank you for dropping in today and hope you have enjoyed the music… thanks Sally

William Price King meets some Legends – Dionne Warwick to the present day.


Welcome to the weekly music feature with William Price King who shares the background and music of some of the most iconic artists of the last century.

William Price King now takes us from the beginning of the 1980s through to the present day, sharing the highlights of Dionne Warwick’s career in those years.

Since the start of the 1980s, Dionne Warwick has devoted much of her time to charity and her contribution and one song in particular stands out as being one that brought much needed attention and funds for AIDS research.

“That’s what friends are for” written by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager was first recorded in 1982 by Rod Stewart for the soundtrack of the film “Night Shift.” A one-off collaboration headed by Dionne Warwick and featuring Gladys Knight, Elton John, and Stevie Wonder was released as a charity single in the UK and the U.S. in 1985.

It was recorded as a benefit for AIDS Research, and raised over $3 million for that cause. Warwick, who had previously raised money for blood-related diseases such as sickle-cell anemia, wanted to help combat the then-growing AIDS epidemic because she had seen friends die painfully of the disease. It was a massive hit, becoming the #1 single of 1986 in the United States, and winning the Grammy Awards for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals and Song of the Year. Dionne Warwick, Luther Vandross, Gladys Knight, and Stevie Wonder performed the song live together for the first time in 23 years at the 25th Anniversary of “The Foundation for AIDS Research” Gala in New York City on February 10, 2011.

In recognition of Dionne Warwick’s work to bring awareness to these issues, President Ronald Reagan appointed her as United States Ambassador of Health in 1987.

“Love Power” is a duet by Miss Warwick and Jeffrey Osborne from Warwick’s album “Reservations for Two,” penned by Bacharach and Sager, and was her 6th number one hit on the Adult Contemporary chart, 1987. The track reached #11 on the Cash Box Top 100 and #12 on the Billboard Hot 100. It was her last appearance in the ‘Top 40’.

“Sunny Weather Lover” marks Warwick’s glorious reunion with Burt Bacharach and Hal David. This song is from the album “Friends Can Be Lovers,” her tenth for the Arista label, recorded in 1992 and produced by Clive Davis.

“Love Will Find A Way,” a 1993 duet that Warwick recorded with her niece Whitney Houston was written by Warwick’s eldest son David Elliott and Terry Steele, from the album “Friends Can Be Lovers.”

The album also features Warwick in a duet with close friend Luther Vandross on the song “Fragile,” written by pop star Sting. “The entire album feels the way that it actually happened, which is why I am so proud of it. It’s full of love. It’s full of friendship, it’s full of family and it’s full of people (producers) who wanted to give the very best that they could possibly give.”

Another notable album is “Aquarela do Brasil” (Watercolors of Brazil), a collection of Brazilian music released in 1994. Warwick first visited Brazil in the early 1960s and has become so entranced by the South American country that she has bought a home there and has studied Portuguese. “I love Brazil. I see there so much of what we’ve lost here in America. I see complete families, from grandmother to grandchild and in between at the malls on Saturdays together, on Sundays at the park together … I think the most important thing is that we all have problems obviously, but for whatever reasons it appears that through it all, people in Brazil still have the ability to smile, there is always tomorrow still. This attitude particularly captivated me,” Warwick told Cristina M. Eibscher of “News from Brazil” in 1995.

Dionne Warwick has adopted a favela or shanty town in Rio de Janeiro. “The Brazilian people have been offering me so much that I felt that it was time for me to give something in return for their hospitality and friendship. That’s when I decided to adopt a favel and help people who are needy. It’s a great feeling to know that you can contribute for the happiness and well being of others, especially for the well being of Brazilian children,” Warwick explained to Eibscher.

Dionne Warwick lost her sister, Dee Dee, in 2008, and her cousin, Whitney Houston, four years later. Despite these personal losses, Warwick continued to perform and to record new music.

My Life, as I See It: An Autobiography” by David Freeman Wooley was released in November 2010. (Click Image to buy).

In March 2011, Warwick exercised her philanthropic spirit even more when she appeared on the “The Celebrity Apprentice 4” to win money for her charity, The Hunger Project.

In 2012, Warwick celebrated her 50th year in music with the album “Now.” The recording features songs written by Bacharach and David. She once explained her longevity, saying “I really attribute it to remaining who I am and not jumping ship, being completely cognizant of what the people … are accustomed to hearing from me.”

Warwick is the second most charted female vocalist of all time with more 60 songs and selling over 100M records in her 57-year career.

Dionne Warwick won numerous awards during her career, including 5 Grammys, three Grammy Hall of Fame awards, NAACP Image Award, ASCAP Lifetime Achievement Award, Women’s World Lifetime Achievement Award, as well as many Vocalist of the Year awards.

The latest news on a documentary on the life of Dionne Warwick currently in production.

A documentary feature film about Dionne Warwick titled “Don’t Make Me Over,” is in the works, which will provide a “glimpse into the life of one of the most famous, yet notoriously private, superstars of the last 60 years,” according to a statement. David Garrett’s Mister Smith Entertainment will launch sales on the film and present select footage to international buyers at next month’s Cannes Market.

The film, co-directed and co-produced by Dave Wooley and David Heilbroner, and written by Wooley, “brings to life the real Dionne Warwick, an African-American woman who broke racial and gender barriers, a dedicated humanitarian fighting injustice worldwide, and a singer whose music became the soundtrack for generations.”

Directors of photography are Oscar nominee Tom Bergmann (“Life, Animated”) and Academy Award winner Ronan Killeen (“O.J. Made in America”). The film is being edited by Emmy Award winner Aljernon Tunsil (“Through the Fire: The Legacy of Barack Obama”).

Source: http://variety.com/2017/film/global/dionne-warwick-movie-mister-smith-cannes-1202402665/

To end this series on the legendary Miss Dionne Warwick….

In a special tribute to President Barack Obama, music legend Dionne Warwick graced the 24th Annual Stellar Awards (2009) in Atlanta, with a superb rendition of “Battle Hymn of the Republic.”

 

Buy the music of Dionne Warwick: https://www.amazon.com/Dionne-Warwick/e/B000APYFYM

Additional material: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dionne_Warwick

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find all of William’s posts on Jazz, Classical and Contemporary artists in this link: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-a-man-and-his-music-jazz-classical-and-contemporary-legends/

Thanks for dropping by and we hope you have enjoyed this week’s performances.. Your feedback is always welcome. Sally

William Price King Meets some Legends – Dionne Warwick – I’ll Never Love This Way Again – 1970s


Welcome to this week’s post on the wonderful Dionne Warwick who had enjoyed a fabulous 1960s working with the legendary Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Unfortunately the 1970s were not going to be so easy for this collaborative relationship nor Dionne Warwick’s career.

William Price King picks up the story of the career and music of Dionne Warwick as she enters the 1970s with a second Grammy Award for her best-selling album “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again. This was a music first as she was the first African-American solo female artist of her generation to win the highly sought after award for Best Contemporary Female Vocalist Performance, which had only been awarded to another earlier legend, Ella Fitzgerald.

Unfortunately the winning combination of Burt Bacharach and Hal David came to a very difficult split in 1972. Dionne Warwick had signed with Warner Bros records in 1971 and was contracted to produce an album of Bacharach and David compositions. This also fractured the long term collaboration with the singer, who was hurt by finding out in the newspapers that the music partnership was over. Threatened by a breach of contract suit by Warners, Dionne Warwick sued both Burt Bacharach and Hal David, eventually winning an out of court settlement.

“Then Came You,” which Warwick recorded with the group “The Spinners” was a 1974 Grammy nominated hit written by Sherman Marshall, Phillip T. Pugh and produced by Thom Bell. This song became Warwick’s first ever single to reach #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and became her highest charting R&B record reaching #2 on that chart. It became an RIAA certified gold record.

Unfortunately, despite the success of the song, Dionne Warwick hit a very touch patch both personally and professionally. Her marriage to Bill Elliott in 1967 which had produced two sons, came to an end in 1975, followed by the death of her father in 1969 and the ill-health of her mother.

Dionne turned to almost nonstop touring. “I felt I’d blow emotionally if I didn’t immerse myself in work. I pushed myself,” Warwick told Rich Wiseman of “People Magazine.

However, in 1979 she signed with Arista records, and label president Clive Davis, who had also been instrumental in the career of Warwick’s cousin, Whitney Houston, was excited and proud to have Warwick on his label.

Davis arranged for Barry Manilow to produce Warwick’s first Arista album, “Dionne.” Warwick was uneasy at first about working with Manilow, fearing their differing styles would clash. She was especially concerned that the album might have a “disco” sound. Happily, the Warwick-Manilow collaboration was spectacularly successful, resulting in the hits “I’ll Never Love This Way Again” and “Deja Vu.”

“I’ll Never Love This Way Again” from the album “Dionne” was a Grammy Award-winning, Gold-certified 1979 hit for Miss Warwick. This song, composed by Richard Kerr and Will Jennings, was produced by Barry Manilow and reached #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #13 Billboard’s R&B chart.

The song won Warwick a 1980 Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance. The tune was certified by the RIAA as Gold for sales of over 1 million copies and helped her Arista debut album, “Dionne,” be certified by the RIAA as Platinum for album sales of over 1 million copies.

“Deja Vu,” a ballad written by Issac Hayes and Adrienne Anderson was the second hit song for Warkick from her 1979 album “Dionne.” “Deja Vu” went to number fifteen on the Billboard Hot 100, number twenty-five on the Soul chart, and number one on the Adult Contemporary chart, early in 1980. Warwick won the Grammy for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance for “Deju Vu” as well as winning Best Pop Female Vocal Performance for “I’ll Never Love This Way Again,” becoming the first artist ever to win the R&B and Pop categories on the same night.

The title song from her 1982 album “Heart-beaker” took her yet again to the top ten on the Billboard chart. The song was written by Barry Gibb of the Bee Gees, who also produced the album. Warwick admitted that she was not fond of “Heartbreaker” but recorded it because she trusted the Bee Gees’ judgment that it would be a hit.

It turned out to be Dionne’s most successful solo hit of the 1980s. Maurice Gibb, who was a co-writer of this song commented, “I cried my eyes out after we wrote it. I drove home and thought, ‘We should be doing this one’, and when she did it, it was brilliant. We sang on it, and it still became like a duet between the Bee Gees and Dionne Warwick.” The song reached the top of charts around the world and stands as one of Warwick’s biggest career hits. It was ranked as Billboard magazine’s 80th biggest US hit of 1983. In the UK Singles Chart, the track reached number 2 for two weeks in November 1982.

Buy the music of Dionne Warwick: https://www.amazon.com/Dionne-Warwick/e/B000APYFYM

Additional material: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dionne_Warwick

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find all of William’s posts on Jazz, Classical and Contemporary artists in this link: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-a-man-and-his-music-jazz-classical-and-contemporary-legends/

Thanks for dropping by and we hope you have enjoyed this week’s performances.. Your feedback is always welcome. Sally

William Price King meets some Legends – Dionne Warwick – A hit filled 1960s


Welcome to part two of the Dionne Warwick series and this week the hits keep rolling in for this dynamic artist.  I will now hand you over to William Price King to pick up the story, and share the music he has selected to showcase this week.

The mid-1960s and the remainder of the decade was a wonderfully productive time for Dionne Warwick and the team of Hal David and Burt Bacharach. This included “Message to Michael” in 1966. The song had been a Bacharach and David hit for other artists including Jerry Butler  with “Message to Martha” and Adam Faith with the title ‘Kentucky Bluebird’ which reached #12 in the UK Charts. In all the different versions including “Message to Michael” by Dionne Warwick, the lyrics are addressed to a bluebird by the singer, whose lover is in New Orleans and wants them to return. There were two other massive hits for Dionne Warwick released that year.

In “I Say a Little Prayer,” Hal David wanted to convey a woman’s concern for her man who was serving in the Vietnam War with this song recorded by Warwick in 1966. This song, from the album “Windows of the World” peaked at number four on the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in December 1967. On the R&B Singles chart it peaked at number eight.

The other song was “Trains and Boats and Planes” which Dionne Warwick recorded in 1966, arranged and conducted by Burt Bacharach, and produced by Bacharach and David. It spent 7 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It also reached #37 on Billboard’s Easy Listening chart and #49 on Billboard’s Hot Rhythm & Blue’s chart. Other hit versions of this song were recorded by Bacharach himself and by Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas.

“(Theme from) Valley of the Dolls” is a 1967 song by André and Dory Previn, composed for the film version of the Jacqueline Susann novel “Valley of the Dolls.” Actress Barbara Parkins, who starred in the motion picture, suggested that Warwick be considered to sing the film’s theme song. The song was to be given to Judy Garland, who had been fired from the film. Warwick performed the song, and when the film became a success in the early weeks of 1968, her single from the film theme became a million-seller, peaking at #2 for four weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 in early 1968, #2 on the Cash Box Top 100 and #1 on the Record World chart. The song was the B-side of the million selling tune “I Say a Little Prayer.” The single would become one of the biggest double-sided hits of the rock era. The album “Dionne Warwick in Valley of the Dolls” peaked at number six on the Billboard Top 10 Albums chart, and would remain on the chart for over a year.

Dionne also saw success with another movie theme for “Alfie” in 1967 getting into the top twenty in the US.. There had been a number of covers of the Cilla Black original, including by Cher, but it was the Dionne Warwick interpretation of the Bacharach and David composition and lyrics that made it in America.

“Do You Know The Way To San Jose” was written and composed for Warwick by Bacharach/David. The song was Warwick’s biggest international hit, selling over a million copies and winning Warwick her first Grammy Award. David’s lyrics tell the story of a native of San Jose, California who, having failed to break into the entertainment field in Los Angeles, is set to return to her hometown. It became Warwick’s third consecutive Top Ten song, punctuating the most successful period of Warwick’s recording career. The song peaked at #8 in the UK, Ireland, and Canada. It also charted in France, Italy, South Africa, Australia, Germany, Brazil, Mexico, and many other countries. Dionne won the Grammy Award for Contemporary Pop Vocal for this song in 1968

“I’ll Never Fall In Love Again” was written by Bacharach/David for the 1968 musical Promises, Promises. Several recordings of the song were released in 1969, the most popular of which was by Dionne Warwick, who took it to number six on Billboard magazine’s Hot 100, and spent three weeks at number one on the magazine’s list of the 40 most popular Easy Listening songs in the US. At the 12th Annual Grammy Awards on March 11, 1970, Bacharach and David were the songwriting nominees of “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again” in the “Song of the Year”category but lost to Joe South for “Games People Play.” However Dionne Warwick won the Grammy Award for Contemporary Pop Vocal for the song.

“This Guy’s in Love with You” was written by Bacharach and David and recorded originally by Herb Alpert and Tijuana Brass with Alpert singing lead vocals. He originally sang the track on television on the Beat of the Brass show and due to viewer response went on to release it as a single in June 1968. It went to #1 and stayed there for four weeks. Dionne Warwick’s version went to #7 in the charts in 1969.

Bacharach told “Newsweek” that Warwick’s sound “has the delicacy and mystery of sailing ships in bottles. It’s tremendously inspiring. We cut songs for her like fine cloth, tailor-made.

Warwick’s appeal crossed racial barriers. She was to the 1960s what Nat King Cole had been to the 1950s—a mainstream performer who happened to be black. Nevertheless, Warwick occasionally faced race related problems such as bigoted hecklers in the audience  Cool and confident, Warwick responded to anti-black sentiment with cutting remarks and, if necessary, forceful letters to local authorities. Having grown up in a racially mixed, lower middle class community in the North, Warwick was never hesitant about appearing in the South. “To me, Mississippi is just a long word. They’ve got their problems, but they’re not going to make them my problems,” Warwick explained to “Ebony Magazine” in 1968.

Dionne Warwick made her acting debut in the film “Slaves,” with co-stars Ossie Davis, and Stephen Boyd. The film was directed by Herbert Biberman and was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival.

Buy the music of Dionne Warwick: https://www.amazon.com/Dionne-Warwick/e/B000APYFYM

Additional material: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dionne_Warwick

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find all of William’s posts on Jazz, Classical and Contemporary artists in this link: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-a-man-and-his-music-jazz-classical-and-contemporary-legends/

Thanks for dropping by and we hope you have enjoyed this week’s performances.. Your feedback is always welcome. Sally

William Price King meets some Legends – Dionne Warwick – The Early Years.


Welcome to a new series of William Price King meets some Legends and we will now be following the life and career of the amazing singer, Dionne Warwick.. I will hand you over now to William to share her early life and first chart hits.

The Gospel, R&B and Soul dynamo that millions of fans would come to love around the world, began life as Marie Dionne Warrick in December 1940 in East Orange, New Jersey. Her father was Mancel Warrick, who worked as a chef, record producer and accountant,and her mother Lee Drinkard, who was the manager of an established musical group The Drinkard Singers. It was inevitable, that coming from a Gospel background, that Marie would begin her music career in that style, and in her mid-teens, along with her sister Dee Dee and two cousins, she formed a group called The Gospelaires. Apart from local venues, the group would also perform as backing for other acts.

With this early introduction to music and performance, Dionne went on to study at the Hartt College of Music in Hartford, Connecticut, on a scholarship with the desire to become a public school music teacher. Whilst studying, she continued to perform with the group providing backing vocals for recording sessions in New York.

At the time her mother’s groupThe Drinkards were very popular in the area and many members of her mother’s family were part of the ensemble, including grandparents aunts and uncles. Dionne began working with her mother to guide the group, and they became even more successful with the addition of her vocals. After an appearance at the 1957 Newport Jazz Festival, they recorded the first gospel album to appear on a major label with the live “A Joyful Noise”, for RCA Records in 1959

After several personnel changes in the early 1960s, the remaining members of the group in 1967 became The Sweet Inspirations who would sing background for the Warwick sisters, Aretha Franklin and Elvis Presley.

In 1961, during a summer vacation from college, Dionne rejoined The Gospelaires to sing back up on The Drifters recording of “Mexican Divorce.” Conducting the session was the song’s composer Burt Bacharach.

“She was singing louder than everybody else so I couldn’t help noticing her,” Bacharach recalled. “Not only was she clearly audible, but Dionne had something. Just the way she carries herself, the way she works, her flow and feeling for the music – it was there when I first met her. She had, and still has, a kind of elegance, a grace that very few other people have.”

Based on his observations, he and his lyricist partner, Hal David approached Dionne to find out if she might be interested in recording demos of his compositions to pitch to record labels.

It was one of these demos “It’s Love That Really Counts” that would go on to be recored by The Shirelles for Scepter Records, that caught the attention of the President of the label, Florence Greenberg. She advised Bacharach to sign Dionne to his own production company which then signed to Scepter in 1962. However Bacharach still had the freedom to produce Dionne under his own management without interference from the labels dictates. This gave both of them the freedom to explore more complex compositions and Dionne’s vocal abilities.

Dionne Warrick’s first recording for Scepter, released in 1962, was more Bacharach-David material. Though Scepter was promoting the song “I Smiled Yesterday” as the potential hit, it was the record’s “B” side, the powerfully plaintive “Don’t Make Me Over,” that caught on and went to the number twenty-one position on the Billboard chart. A misspelling on the record – Warwick instead of Warrick – gave Warwick her stage name.

“Don’t make me over, man, (you have to) accept me for what I am” are the words that Warwick cried in her disappointment when she learned from Bacharach and Hal David that her record label did not think that her style was right. She felt that she was being used, manipulated, and exploited. Hearing those words, David said to Bacharach: “Burt, I think we just heard the title of a new song.” Hal David, not one to miss an opportunity to be inspired by life’s circumstances, used Warwick’s energetic outburst as the title and sentiment for “Don’t Make Me Over,” changing the meaning of the phrase to “Accept me for what I am,” and adding “Accept me for the things that I do.” “Don’t Make Me Over” was inducted to the Gammy Hall of Fame” in 2000.

Having now begun to establish her own style and with a new stage name, Dionne Warwick was fast tracked into the charts with some iconic hits over the next five years.

“Make it easy on yourself,” written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, was first of all a hit by Jerry Butler in 1962. Dionne Warwick did a cover of the song for her album “Presenting Dionne Warwick” in 1963 and her eventual hit of this track was from a live concert performance at the Garden State Arts Center in New Jersey in the summer of 1970. The single peaked at #2 on the Easy Listening Chart, #37 on the Pop chart and #26 on the R1B chart.

“Walk on By” is from the 1964 album “Make Way for Dionne Warwick.” This song peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 and was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1965 for the Best Rhythm and Blues Recording. The song was ranked number 70 on the Rolling Stone list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time,” the second highest song by a solo female artist on the list after “Respect” by Aretha Franklin.

“Anyone Who Had a Heart” was presented to Dionne Warwick in unfinished form while she, Burt Bacharach and Hal David were rehearsing in Bacharach’s Manhattan apartment for an upcoming recording session. Bacharach had finished the score which, in his words, “changes time signature constantly, 4/4 to 5/4, and a 9/16 bar at the end of the song on the turnaround. It wasn’t intentional, it was all just natural. That’s the way I felt it.”

This was the first use of polyrhythm in popular music. Warwick recorded this song at Bell Sound Studios in Manhattan in November 1963. According to published reports, Warwick nailed the tune in only one take. The track became Warwick’s first Top Ten single in January 1964, peaking at #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 and the Cash Box Pop 100 that February, also reaching #6 on the Cash Box R&B chart.

Buy the music of Dionne Warwick: https://www.amazon.com/Dionne-Warwick/e/B000APYFYM

Additional material: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dionne_Warwick

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find all of William’s posts on Jazz, Classical and Contemporary artists in this link: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-a-man-and-his-music-jazz-classical-and-contemporary-legends/

Thanks for dropping by and we hope you have enjoyed this week’s performances.. Your feedback is always welcome. Sally