Smorgasbord Poetry – Colleen Chesebro’s Tuesday Tanka Challenge No. 144 – Double #Etheree -The Charm of Fairies by Sally Cronin


This week’s prompt words for Colleen’s Tuesday Poetry Challenge 144 were ‘Enchant and Fly’ and I have used the synonyms ‘Charm and Soar’ for my double etheree

Image PIxabay

Double etheree – The Charm of Fairies – Sally Cronin

I
believe
in fairies.
I have done so
since I was a child,
and saw them clear as day.
Finding me they sought to charm,
fluttering on gossamer wings,
and sprinkling fairy dust in my eyes,
so I could see the magic in our world.
People will state that they do not exist,
and are of the imagination.
This is because they have not seen,
or felt the wonders you have.
Not all this world is known,
or those parallel.
Let in the joy
and you will
learn to
soar

©sally cronin 2019

If you would like to participate in this week’s poetry challenge then please head over and check the post: https://colleenchesebro.com/2019/09/10/colleens-2019-weekly-tanka-tuesday-poetry-challenge-no-144-synonymsonly/

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Smorgasbord Book Reviews – Fairies, Myths and Magic – A Summer Celebration by Colleen M. Chesebro


I am delighted to review the lovely book by Colleen M. Chesebro, Fairies, Myths & Magic: A Summer Celebration.

About the collection.

Step into a world where fairies, dragons, and other magical beings converge in a collection of poetry and short stories inspired by the celebration of Litha, the Summer Solstice.

Meet Drac, a dragon cursed by his own poisonous deeds, and two pixies who help an old man remember a lost love. You’ll meet a pair of fairies with a sense of humor, and a young girl who fulfills her destiny after being struck by lightning. Learn what happens when a modern witch’s spell goes terribly wrong. Meet the Sisters of the Fey, a group of Slavic Witches who sign a pact with the Rusalki Fey to preserve their magic for the good of all.

Atmospheric and haunting, the prose and poetry, will rewrite the mythologies of the past bringing them into the future.

My review for the book – Five Stars

I don’t really do wet and grey winters so I was badly in need of a tonic. This was very effectively supplied by the delightful collection of poetry and short stories by Colleen Chesebro.

Fairies have fascinated me since childhood, but my knowledge of the elves, pixies and other magical creatures, pales in comparison to that of the author. Clearly an observer of nature and the hidden worlds that only a chosen few have seen, she brings her cast of players to life delightfully. You will discover the different forms of fairy you might meet if you are lucky during a walk in a garden or lane, and you will find out about a chance encounter that  was life changing.

You will also be introduced to some humans such as Roger who find themselves living in close proximity to these ethereal creatures. And there is definitely mischief afoot when two pixies get their hand on a potent spell… One of my favourite poems was The Fairy Spider’s Lair, but to be honest, I was spoiled for choice.

There is so much to enjoy in this book that celebrates the magic world and summer, that I am sure that you too will lose yourself in its pages. Great for all ages and children will love it too.

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/Fairies-Myths-Magic-Summer-Celebration-ebook/dp/B07DTSBH4T

And Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fairies-Myths-Magic-Summer-Celebration-ebook/dp/B07DTSBH4T

Also by Colleen M. Chesebro

 

Read the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/default/e/B01N9MV2RX

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fairies-Myths-Magic-Summer-Celebration-ebook/dp/B07DTSBH4T

Read more reviews and follow Colleen Chesebro on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16254415.Colleen_M_Chesebro

About Colleen M. Chesebro

Colleen M. Chesebro is a writer and author of YA fantasy and magical realism, cross-genre fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. She loves all things magical which may mean that she could be experiencing her second childhood – or not. That part of her life hasn’t been fully decided yet.

A few years ago, a mystical experience led her to renew her passion for writing and storytelling. These days she resides in the fantasy realm of the Fairy Whisperer where she writes the magical poetry and stories that the fairy nymphs whisper to her in her dreams.

Colleen won the Little and Laugh Flash Fiction Contest sponsored by the Carrot Ranch Literary Community.com in November 2017 for her piece, called, “The Bus Stop.” Her debut novel, “The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy,” won gold in the 2017 AuthorsDB.com cover contest.

Colleen lives in Colorado with her husband. When she is not writing, she enjoys spending time with her husband and friends. She also loves gardening, reading, and crocheting old-fashioned doilies into works of art.

Connect to Colleen.

Website: https://colleenchesebro.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/list/16254415.Colleen_M_Chesebro
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ColleenChesebro
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/colleen.chesebro.3

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you will enjoy reading Fairies, Myths & Magic – Thanks Sally.

 

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New on the Shelves – Fairies, Myths and Magic: A Summer Celebration by Colleen M. Chesebro


Delighted to feature the new book by Colleen M. Chesebro, Fairies, Myths & Magic: A Summer Celebration. And great news…the collection isthe No. 1 NEW release in poetry anthologies on Amazon.

About the book

Step into a world where fairies, dragons, and other magical beings converge in a collection of poetry and short stories inspired by the celebration of Litha, the Summer Solstice.

Meet Drac, a dragon cursed by his own poisonous deeds, and two pixies who help an old man remember a lost love. You’ll meet a pair of fairies with a sense of humor, and a young girl who fulfills her destiny after being struck by lightning. Learn what happens when a modern witch’s spell goes terribly wrong. Meet the Sisters of the Fey, a group of Slavic Witches who sign a pact with the Rusalki Fey to preserve their magic for the good of all.

Atmospheric and haunting, the prose and poetry, will rewrite the mythologies of the past bringing them into the future.

One of the early reviews for the book

Colleen Cheseboro takes us into the magical world of fairies and magical folklore in her charming book, Fairies, Myths & Magic. This author has a gift for bringing our imaginations into her stories with her words and imagery as she opens us up to the world of fantasy and myths.

In this book, Chesebro introduces us to fairies, pixies, and various other mythical creatures who come alive in her stories. There is an assortment of short stories, haibuns, haikus and touching stories, all sprinkled with magic. Read about this author’s real life encounter with a Swamp Fairy, which became the inspiration for her first book, The Swamp Fairy, in Book 1 of The Heartstone Chronicles. Read about Roger’s Ringing Ears, an introduction to the magical beginnings of The Sisters of the Fey, stories with lovespells and how they can backfire, Dragons and Karma, impaired pixies, and many more!

Heartwarming, humorous and entertaining are just some of the emotions and reactions I felt while reading this book. If you enjoy magical stories, you’ll love this book!

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/Fairies-Myths-Magic-Summer-Celebration-ebook/dp/B07DTSBH4T

And Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fairies-Myths-Magic-Summer-Celebration-ebook/dp/B07DTSBH4T

Also by Colleen M. Chesebro

Read the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/default/e/B01N9MV2RX

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fairies-Myths-Magic-Summer-Celebration-ebook/dp/B07DTSBH4T

Find out more about Colleen Chesebro, read more reviews and follow on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16254415.Colleen_M_Chesebro

 

About Colleen M. Chesebro

Colleen M. Chesebro is a writer and author of YA fantasy and magical realism, cross-genre fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. She loves all things magical which may mean that she could be experiencing her second childhood – or not. That part of her life hasn’t been fully decided yet.

A few years ago, a mystical experience led her to renew her passion for writing and storytelling. These days she resides in the fantasy realm of the Fairy Whisperer where she writes the magical poetry and stories that the fairy nymphs whisper to her in her dreams.

Colleen won the Little and Laugh Flash Fiction Contest sponsored by the Carrot Ranch Literary Community.com in November 2017 for her piece, called, “The Bus Stop.” Her debut novel, “The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy,” won gold in the 2017 AuthorsDB.com cover contest.

Colleen lives in Colorado with her husband. When she is not writing, she enjoys spending time with her husband and friends. She also loves gardening, reading, and crocheting old-fashioned doilies into works of art.

Connect to Colleen.

Website: https://colleenchesebro.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/list/16254415.Colleen_M_Chesebro
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ColleenChesebro
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/colleen.chesebro.3

One of the recent reviews for The Swamp Fairy

Connect to Colleen.

Website: https://colleenchesebro.com
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/list/16254415.Colleen_M_Chesebro
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ColleenChesebro
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/colleen.chesebro.3

Thank you for dropping in today and it would be great if you could share Colleen’s news on your social media. Thanks Sally.

Guest Writer – Essay Seven – Fantastic Realms 1: Genius Loci by Horatio Grin


This essay follows on from the six that I featured last week and can be found in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/guest-writer-fairies-the-hidden-history-by-horatio-grin/

Fantastic Realms 1: Genius Loci by Horatio Grin

During the introduction in ‘Lost Beginnings of the Fairy Races’, I distinguished between the two types of fairies haunting popular imagination. The first were the fairy races of Chinese and Indo-European myth, who are described as essentially human but with extraordinary abilities. The second group I called nature spirits or elementals.

I realise this is hardly an all-encompassing description given the number of preternatural entities occupying the astral planes surrounding the physical realm, but I needed to be quite firm due to the enormous diversity of such phantasmagorical creatures. Given the complex relationships between the plethora of beings occupying the ethereal, I feared being drawn into labyrinthine byways of definition and distinction, and losing the thrust of my argument all together.

In occult lore they range from said elementals, goblins and shape-shifting sprites, to djinn races, great and minor demons, as well as the angelic choirs. It must be said some are closer to human than others. At the fringes exist creatures that literally defy comprehension in their strangeness.

Now I have secured my theories concerning what, for the sake of ease, I refer to as the humanistic Fairy Races (those evolving alongside man from an ancient common ancestor), it is time to redress the balance and explore the myriad of magical beings in existence.

The Ancient Romans used the all-encompassing term Genius Loci to describe the guardian spirits of holy places. It included the nymphs of trees and water and half human wild creatures such as satyrs; as well as non-human hauntings and inexplicable sensations associated with sacred places: glades, temples, standing stones, wells, springs, lakes, mountains and a thousand and one other places. Such sensations include feelings of déjà vu, pricking of the skin, shivers down the back, the small hairs on the neck and arms standing on end, and sudden violent overwhelming emotions such as hysteria, euphoria or melancholy.

Today the old word Genius means something entirely different. It conjures up knowledge and skills far beyond normal human ability. This is because it originally signified someone who was temporarily or permanently possessed by one of the greater or lesser gods.

Even today we refer to ‘flashes of genius’ and believe genius sits next to madness (another sign of possession by a god).

There is one more modern word whose origins we ignore: inspiration. Inspiration was a gift of the gods like prophecy. A prophet was not merely a soothsayer but someone possessed by a god and whom the god spoke through. This often included the ability to foretell the future as nothing was hidden from the gods.

The Celts believed Gwyn ap Nudd (Lord of the Otherworld) kept a pearl rimmed cauldron filled to the brim with mead, a drink made from fermented honey, which granted the gifts of poetry and eloquence (for which of us are not wiser, more insightful and loquacious after a few drinks). The mead was warmed by the breath of nine maids. This is an uncanny parallel to ancient Greek myth where we find the Nine Muses of Mount Parnassus.

In ancient times these minor goddesses were responsible for Poetry, History, Song, Dance, Drama and Astronomy. Originally there were only three muses; the significantly older and more powerful goddesses of Song, Memory and Practice. In earlier times song and poetry were one the one and the same. Music, drama and dance are still considered gifts of the muses. Creative people will tell you they genuinely fear their muse deserting them.

From the Roman word Genius meaning spirit, Islamic scholars coined the word Djinn. Djinn were originally elemental forces: dust devils, mirages, makers of mysterious patterns on the dunes, wind sculpted rock faces, voices heard in forsaken places and in the eerie singing desert winds. Eventually, the name came to includes unearthly beings possessing both divine and demonic qualities; but more of that later.

Genius Loci residing in ancient magical sites may not necessarily be human. Indeed they may not even constitute what we understand as beings or intelligences. They may be elementals; forces which hold the world in balance by maintaining the equilibrium of their assigned element within the natural order. They are essentially composed of etheric matter from one of the four elements and are able to move through their native element as man moves through the world.

Elementals usually consist of air spirits called Sylphs, who possess a cloud like form; Undines with bodies of glimmering blue green water and eyes like pools in a featureless face; Salamanders possessing bodies of smokeless fire and the Gnomes of the earth.

Across the world there is a huge array of animal and vegetative life elementals belonging to the Eros life force and an equal number of lower demons, representing ill luck and disease, belonging to the death force: Thanatos.

Other examples of Thanatos sprites include the Irish Banshee who wails at the impending death of certain noble families; the Scottish Washer at the Ford who also foretells death; the ghostly black dogs giving a similar warnings and apparitions (white ladies, headless horsemen and phantom armies) haunting old scenes of violence. For none of these spectres have an independent existence outside their primary purpose.

As elementals arise where they are needed to keep their part of the world turning, they may in fact be different aspects of the same force. The Gnostics referred to this primal force as the Demiurge. Taking their name from the Greek work for knowledge, the Gnostics were an ancient mystical Christian sect whose origins lie in the religions of Judaism, Babylon, Mesopotamia and Egypt.

The Gnostics did not believe a Supreme Being would make a world so flawed and marred by misery, disease and death. They credited the creation of the world to a rebellious subordinate with ambitions above his station, who they called both the ‘Demiurge’ and ‘The Lord of this World’: a name more recently acquired by the Christian devil. It is from the primal force of the Demiurge that the lower ethereal beings including elementals and the minor demons emanate.

Although powerful elementals and the lower demons have no reason or free will, they have cunning. To mortals they appear to possess personality traits associated to their native element: be it mercurial, calming, tempestuous, quick and angry or solid and dependable. If properly bound, they make good magical servants. But their powers are limited to a range encompassed by their native element. As they have no human intelligence, the magician must bond with an elemental to harness and direct its powers. This often results in possession, leaving a carless magician exhibiting outbursts of raw emotion and monomaniacal compulsions that are often deemed as madness.

Similar to elemental possession, but of a lower order, are atavistic resurgences. Artist and occultist Austin Osman Spare believed there were chaos elementals within the lower demonic orders. He argued spiritual development paralleled physical evolution. Just as a fish’s fins became animal limbs and we have vestigial organs like the appendix, and the primitive cerebellum that underlies our complex rational brain, so we retain remnants of primitive souls. These revenants contain violent mindless emotional energies from the time when the universe was chaos. It is these unconscious irrational impulses (collectively referred to as the id by Freudian psychoanalysts) chaos elementals ignite within their host.

When chaos elementals violently unleash subliminal energies they can literally overwhelm and consume the rational mind in a similar but more devastating way than nature elementals. Through learning techniques to control elemental forces, atavistic resurgence can be made to serve an initiate in much the same way as totem spirit animals guide Shamans through the astral planes.

Lying above the orders of minor demons and mindless elementals sit the ‘little gods’ of nature and the home. While the little gods are closer to the man in thought and appearance, they are not the same as us. Due to their wholly or mainly human appearance, and natural empathy with the human spirit, they can unwittingly deceive humanity into thinking they are kin. Beware, for they are not. They are not blessed with either free-will, morality or rationality. Under their human veneer lurk wild creatures of impulse. Esoteric doctrines that speak of the soul’s evolution claim their apparent humanity is a direct result of being in our presence.

The household gods gave rise to stories of Brownies – tiny elves who help around the home. It may surprise you to know when the Girl Guides created a junior branch they took the name Brownies from these helpful domestic creatures. Originally the intended name was ‘Rosebuds’.

Brownies, and their kind, are unequivocally dependent in some way on man’s spirit for their human attributes, for they only exist around humanity. They do not demonstrate higher faculties or intelligence, preferring instead routine repetitive tasks. They find it difficult to communicate with man, though they chatter incessantly among themselves. Brownies and their ilk do not easily adapt to change and will continue to haunt abandoned mine workings, farms and villages, even though lack of human contact drives them mad turning them into malevolent goblins and boggarts.

The word ‘nymph’ meant a girl of marriageable age – judged to be so when she became nubile, or womanly; as opposed to looking like a child. There were nymphs of fresh water (Naiads) and the sea (Nereids). Both become foam when they die as in Hans Christian Anderson’s The Little Mermaid. There are two types of tree nymphs. Hamadryads die when their tree dies, the others who do not. They are collectively known as dryads, although this is a misnomer. Each type is individually known by their chosen tree: dryads are only spirits of the oak; meliai of the ash; caryatid of the walnut and epimaliad of the apple. Their male counterparts are the vegetative principle and the rutting beast.

The vegetative principles are jointly Named ‘Green Man’ and ‘Old Man of the Woods’. They are linked to the spirits of winter and summer and often wedded to Eostre: the goddess of spring, or Ceres: the goddess of harvest. Each year the Old Man of the Woods is murdered by his rival and successor the Green Man, who ages over the year to be murdered in turn by the new Green Man.

The Arthurian romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a late and somewhat glossed over retelling of this myth. The Old Man of the Woods is the name given to a poisonous psychoactive mushroom, an intoxicant fed to the human sacrifice before the rite to allow the nature spirit to inhabit him.

Satyrs are the male animal procreative drive, the rut of spring or autumn that drives out every other instinct, while Silenes, associated with Bacchus, signify intoxication; originally considered a way of directly communing with the gods.

Occupying much the same niche as the nymphs and satyrs of classical mythology are the Huldr or hidden folk of Northern Europe. The Huldr and their kin, the Nixe, bridge the humanistic fairy races with both the angelic races and nature spirits. They are creatures of the forest, known for their great kindness to woodsmen and charcoal burners. While male Huldr are incredibly ugly, Huldr women, like fairy queens are seductively beautiful, except they possess a fox’s tail.

It is incredible the Huldr from Scandinavia and Lapland have counterparts in the fox spirits of Chinese mythology. At 50 years of age a Chinese fox spirit can take the shape of a beautiful woman who visits men while they sleep. At 100 it can also become a handsome man that preys on sleeping women. At 1,000 years of age it becomes a celestial being taking its place in heaven.

This is almost identical to the succubus of European legend, a demon who assumes a female shape to visit sleeping men and then become a man impregnating sleeping women with stolen seed. The wizard Merlin’s father was such a creature. In this way the Chinese fox spirits reveal a forgotten tradition that links the Huldr to the angelic realms, for angels and demons are surprisingly not that different.

Nixe or nekker are water sprites who also shape change to lure people to their death by drowning. They appear as beautiful women with siren voices to lure men, or naked youths tempting women with ravishing tunes from their violin. Despite both sexes appearing as handsome seducers, it is believed Nixie have no natural shape. Often they appear as a beautiful white brook-horse. Anyone foolish enough to climb on its back is held fast until the horse dives into the water to drown them. They also take the shape of white water-wyrms to trap unwary swimmers.

In the second part of this chapter I discuss the angelic and demonic realms

©HoratioGrin 2017

A brief bio for Horatio Grin

Horatio William Grin was born 29 July 1940 in the village of Kingstone Warren, Oxfordshire, in the shadow of White Horse Hill. His parents were William George Grin, Barrister and latterly King’s Counsel and Beatrice Caroline Grin nee Lough, a younger daughter of Squire Horatio Arthur Lough of the Oxfordshire Loughs.

After matriculating from Whychwood and Rye School, where he stayed as a day boarder, Horatio Grin went up to Girton and Caius College at Cambridge to read Particulate Physics, graduating with First Class Honours. For his Masters he read Russian and Mandarin. Eschewing a career with his alma mater, he joined military intelligence at the age of 23. Little is known of him for the next twenty-five years except for small snippets from diverse sources.

H. W. Grin is credited as a Research Assistant in the abstract of a paper from a team headed by Professor Able Epstein of Cambridge University. Professor Epstein acted as a Senior Researcher at the Los Alomos Facility in New Mexico during the atomic bomb tests. The research paper is not particularly significant, a description of the projected paths of post-collision sub-atomic particles.

His latest work on fairy lore called ‘Fairies: a Hidden History, the Collected Essays of Horatio Grin’, again containing no publisher’s mark, is a series of articles rumoured to be from the Archives of the Magi Temple of Central England. The essays are remarkable for effortlessly marrying ancient mythology and fairy folklore with the latest discoveries in the scientific disciplines of archaeology, genetics and physics. They are currently the subject of controversy among different schools of occult thought.

Please follow the link to read the full biography of this remarkable man: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/19/smorgasbord-guest-writer-19th-june-to-27th-june-author-horatio-grin-biography/

You can read all the previous essays by Horatio Grin in this directory:https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/guest-writer-fairies-the-hidden-history-by-horatio-grin/

As always Horatio would appreciate your feedback.. thanks Sally

Smorgasbord Guest Writer – Part 4: The Problem with Erlkings by Horatio Grin


Welcome to today’s post by Horatio Grin. However much we might like to belief in fairies or their various visitations, it is very difficult to prove their existence when history has been repeatedly scrubbed of any tangible evidence. This is true of the fairy overlords.. The Erklings who science has found lacking. However, Horatio takes us on a journey to potentially restore them to glory.

Part 4: The Problem with Erlkings by Horatio Grin

The first fairies were the offspring of early modern humans and Neanderthals, whose developed frontal lobes indicate telepathic and telekinetic abilities. Fairies are telepaths and cast glamour – an illusionary spell to make an object look different. But glamour does not satisfactorily account for all instances of fairy magic. Sometimes not only the appearance, but also the substance, of an object changes and telekinesis seems the most likely explanation.

Telekinesis is the ability to move objects by the power of the mind. In doing so it holds the key to the manipulation of the universe. There is only a difference of degree between moving a plastic ball across a table and sub-atomic particle.

What we perceive as a solid object is nothing more than a myriad of energy bursts vibrating at the sub-atomic level. If the rate of an object’s atomic vibration was changed, it would cause one solid object to pass through another. If the energy potential from one part of an atom is transferred to another part, elements transmute, quite literally from lead to gold – the aim of generations of alchemists.

When we consider that telekinetic ability is present in no more than a few thousand people out of a world population of almost seven billion, we realise how rare it is. During the last 50 years, laboratory condition experiments in America, Europe and Russia have only yielded a dozen or so subjects. But it may well be that many more people are simply not aware they possess the ability.

Poltergeist activity in teenagers is often the result of spontaneous psychokinetic outbursts, suppressed in later life. Others may discount the talent. I once witnessed a young man make a pencil swing back and forth like a compass needle. He considered it nothing more than a party trick and of no practical use.

His attitude probably reflects a general feeling. People studied under laboratory conditions can do no more than roll a ball across a table, spin small paper cones or control electronic random number generators.

Perhaps people with the gift do not see telekinesis an asset because it is not easy to master. Such is the complexity of nature that turning lead into gold is child’s play when compared to making a living thing like a flower. This may explain why a fairy’s sumptuous feast tastes no better than muck.

The question remains, how would a telekinetic person learn to use the ability?

Acrobats and jugglers have the same bodies as us, but do things we would never attempt. This is because a teacher sculpts their natural skills from an early age. So where are the teachers for gifts such as telekinesis?

Through the ages there have been many schools teaching mastery of the universe, the Orphics, Pythagoreans, Kabbalists, Gnostics and Hermetics to name but a few. Some like the Tibetan Vajrayanas believe enlightenment cannot be attained without a higher guide or master.

Today a teacher may be a yogi, a lama, a high Rosicrucian or even one of the ascended masters of the Theosophists. In ancient times they were probably thought of as gods. I say this because ancient civilisations were most particular to draw a distinction between semi-divine beings such as nymphs, who seem to fit our idea of the fairies, and the gods themselves, who were seen to be entirely different.

To the ancients the Gods were not the same as we would think of God today – an omnipotent, omnipresent and eternal creator, responsible for the whole universe. The gods were more like what we call superheroes, but without the moral fibre. The universe had existed long before they came along. It was created in the time of their forefathers; sometimes by unknown gods. Some gods even prayed to older gods. Others slyly claimed to be related to them; although even mortals were known to take such snobbish conceits with a pinch of salt.

Ancient people knew only too well the gods were flawed; that they could be injured or even die. Two gods died in historical times. The first was Asclepius the Greek God of Medicine. Zeus killed him with a thunderbolt for bringing the dead back to life. The great God Pan died during the reign of the Roman Emperor Tiberius, sometime around 30 AD. No one knows how he died, but the story goes his death was announced to a sailor passing the Isle of Paxos.

There is evidence Fairy Queens can detect the telepathic talents in others, and this is why they steal children to perpetuate their race. They train their protégés telepathically, amplifying the natural talent to resist the bombardment of incoming thoughts and project their own thoughts outwards. An empathic side-effect is the seepage of the fairy queen’s personality, beliefs and even personal memories into the young apprentice.

Perhaps the gods once detected and trained those with telekinesis in much the same way. The theory would certainly account for tales of gods stealing youngsters such as Ganymede and taking them up to the heavens. It would also account for the immortality of gods, especially when we know gods did succumb to injury, disease, and death.

Perhaps when a god died, the apprentice filled the vacancy. Trained telepathically like the pupils of a fairy queen, the apprentice would have empathically absorbed much of their master’s personality, identity and memories, and so was able to seamlessly take the god or goddess’ place. In fact, they may have considered it a sacred duty.

As already discussed, the ancient world met with a series of devastating pandemics that decimated gods and fairies along with the mortals. Compared to mortals both gods and fairies were rare breeds, but the gods were especially so. There were often no more than a few dozen of them at any one time in any one place.

After centuries of plague undermining confidence in their own immortality, and with growing indifference from the population as they failed to stem disaster after disaster, the gods may well have come to see themselves in a different light. In the same way as the fairies did, they would have left behind their claims to divinity becoming magicians or even saints.

It is in the far north of the world, the last stronghold of the old religion, where in early Christian times that we first hear of Erlkings. The name Erlking is a corruption of alder king and identification with the alder tree allows us to trace Erlkings all the way back to Gilgamesh and the Annunaki Star Gods of ancient Sumeria. Despite the name, Erlkings are not exclusively men. Rather the word is used to denote a status or rank more powerful than a fairy queen.

Today the glory days of Fairyland are long gone, and all that remain are isolated fairy nests. With the passing of the splendour much history was lost and all we know of the Erlkings are fragments of half remembered tales. Originally whispered among the fairies themselves, they were recorded by monks desperate to preserve their own dying world from the predation of Viking raiders.

Fairy stories speak of Erlkings as malevolent creatures – enchanters and shape shifters, who turn men to beasts, bring stones to life, conjure castles from thin air, or even kill with a thought. The fact they are shrouded in legend indicates many centuries had passed since one was seen. So why should we believe they ever existed at all?

There is a wealth of evidence of monsters and miracles in a variety of ancient documents stretching across the ages. These days science doubts everything and explains away what it can.

The one-eyed Cyclops is dismissed as the skull of an extinct elephant found in ancient Greece, because the opening for the trunk looks like a giant single eye socket. It is the same with the bones of giants; now viewed as extinct animals that roamed the land a few million years earlier. Dragons are dinosaur bones or perhaps even crocodile skulls, such as those decorating medieval castles in Central Europe. While unicorn horns are merely Narwhale tusks.

From Procopius’ stories of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian, whose head he claimed would fly about the palace at night, to equally miraculous Dark Age tales of Celtic saints found in medieval manuscripts, there is a thousand years of miracles and wonders where men turn to stone; settlements vanish; animals talk; fantastic creatures, strange lights or aerial boats appear; where phantom armies arise and entire kingdoms drown.

But no matter how reputable the chronicler, or how large the number of witnesses, because we know better today, science dismisses all of them as no more than allegory, fancy, hysteria or even group hallucinations cause by eating rye bread infected with the ergot fungi – a naturally source of the hallucinogenic drug LSD.

Although we continually complain about factual liberties taken by journalists in our own age, we would be outraged at the thought of future historians treating our newspapers in the same way.

I believe evidence does exist of unusual magical events from the Golden Age of Fairies in 5th century Britain. For example there are three distinct legends of catastrophically drowned lands, from a period when there is no evidence at all of rising sea levels.

The remains of the drowned land of Cantre’r Gwaelod can still be seen in Cardigan Bay at low tide. Its king, Gwyddno Garanhir, was the owner of one of the 13 Sacred Treasures of Britain – a magical hamper that produced whatever food was desired. Gwyddno was under the protection of the Fairy High King Gwyn ap Nudd.

Gwyn ap Nudd was a powerful magician and the lord of the underworld. Gwyn appears in Arthurian legend and is associated with Glastonbury. A poem records a dialogue between the two kings where an exhausted Gwyn ap Nudd talks of gathering the slain of Britain from the battlefield.

It is known Gwyn kept the Cauldron of Inspiration in his fortress on Glastonbury Tor. This may well be the same miraculous vessel the raven god Bran once possessed; a cooking pot that brought the dead back to life when they were boiled inside it. It is likely Bran inherited the cauldron from his predecessor, Cernunnos: the Celtic stag-horned god of the Wild. Cernunnos is sometimes shown dipping warriors headfirst into his bubbling cauldron.

Maybe Gwyn asked for the loan of Gwyddno’s magical hamper to feed his army of the undead. Perhaps angered by his vassal’s refusal to loan out his sacred treasure, Gwyn caused Gwynddno’s whole kingdom to drown.

Half a century later, Gwyn’s kinsman, Gwentholeu (owner of one of the 13 treasures – a miraculous chess set that played by itself) would seek the rest of the 13 sacred treasures in order to become High King of Britain. But his cousin Rytheric (owner of the sword White Hilt, whose blade burned with flame when touched by a brave man – another of the 13 sacred treasures) betrayed and killed him, sending Gwentholeu’s magician, Merlin, mad with grief.

All that remains of Lyonesse, off Land’s End, is the archipelago of five inhabited islands of the Scilly Isles, along with numerous other small rocky islets. Roman navigators said Scilly was a single island. Today the field walls of ancient farms can be seen at low tide. All evidence points to a catastrophic drowning in the Dark Ages. Unfortunately its fate is not recorded. It was the same with the city of Ys off the coast of Brittany, like Lyonesse another drown place. This time cursed for its wickedness by a Celtic saint.

These three events are now dismissed by science and I think this elegantly summarises the whole problem with Erlkings. If science dismisses every piece of evidence it cannot finds alternative explanations for, simply because it does not believe in psychic phenomena or magic, then how will it ever be possible to prove Erlkings once existed?

©HoratioGrin 2017

Previous posts

You can find out more about the author here: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/19/smorgasbord-guest-writer-19th-june-to-27th-june-author-horatio-grin-biography/

Part one – Lost Beginnings of the Fairy Races

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/20/smorgasbord-guest-writer-part-1-lost-beginnings-of-the-fairy-races-by-horatio-grin/

Part Two – Tales of the Old Gods

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/21/smorgasbord-guest-writer-part-2-tales-of-the-old-gods-by-horatio-grin/

Part 3: Twilight of the Gods by Horatio Grin

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/22/smorgasbord-guest-writer-part-3-twilight-of-the-gods-by-horatio-grin/

Thank you for dropping and Horatio would love to receive your feedback. Thanks Sally

Horatio’s next post will be on Monday.

Smorgasbord Guest Writer – Part 2: Tales of the Old Gods by Horatio Grin


I am delighted to welcome as a guest writer for the next week the esteemed Horatio Grin who takes us back in history to the beginnings of the legends and myths surrounding fairies. Today Horatio explores the origins of the old gods.

  You can find out more about the author here: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/19/smorgasbord-guest-writer-19th-june-to-27th-june-author-horatio-grin-biography/

Part one – Lost Beginnings of the Fairy Races

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/06/20/smorgasbord-guest-writer-part-1-lost-beginnings-of-the-fairy-races-by-horatio-grin/

Part 2: Tales of the Old Gods by Horatio Grin

As we saw, the fairy race may have originated around 40,000 years ago. Yet, we know nothing about the fairies and very little about humans for much of this time. In this period the Ice Age reached its maximum extent. For thousands of years there were glaciers a mile high where London and New York stand today. Much of Europe and North America were bleak frozen wastelands.

About 12,000 years ago the ice began to melt, marking the rise of man and creating the modern world. At first people continued to live as they had always done, eking out a nomadic existence by following animal migrations and seasonal fishing; picking what wild fruits and grain were available as they passed. As the climate became more favourable, they stopped hunting and foraging, and started farming crops and herding animals. Cities developed such as Jericho and Çatal Hüyü, and civilisation arose in the Fertile Crescent in Mesopotamia, Egypt, India and along the Yellow River of China.

As civilisation developed, whole families of gods replaced the goddess cult of the Stone Age and Çatal Hüyük. The oldest of these were the Annunaki or the Star-gods of the Sumerians. Although the original tales of the Annunaki Star-gods are lost, some fragments remain in the earliest written records of five and a half thousand years ago. These say the Annunaki Star-gods created man as their slave, but freed him when he became too difficult to handle. Some of these gods were said to worship a great mother goddess, perhaps a memory of an earlier, more primitive, time.

As with tales of the Egyptian, Indian or Olympian gods, and even in the much later Celtic fairy stories, the Annunaki Star-gods are presented as human, with all our shortcomings and vulnerabilities. They need to eat and drink, rest and sleep. They squabble, are selfish, stupid, and capricious as spoilt children. They get married, have affairs, get drunk and have hangovers.

They are immortal and have superpowers, but they are by no means all-powerful. In many ways they are limited in what they can do, and often are not all that clever. They are spoken of as enchanters: able to cast spells; bring fire from their bodies; travel at great speed and transform rain into chickpeas and barley. Many of the gods have no function at all, which seems strange to us who tend to think of the Greek and Roman gods of the sky and sea, love and war.

All these ancient gods were the same: quarrelsome, vain and lustful. Only in Judaism did God come to be regarded mystically. In all other ancient religions the gods were seen, in a very human sense, as overlords to be obeyed, feared and served. When thinking about the ancient gods in this way, it is hard not to see them as Erlkings; those mysterious entities whispered about by the fairies.

The word fairy only came into use 1,000 years ago, long after Rome fell. It is a Middle English word borrowed from Old French and comes from the Latin ‘fata’ meaning a guardian spirit, while ‘ry’ denotes a place.

The Ancient Greeks and Romans took care to distinguish nymphs and demigods from the ‘little gods’, the so called ‘genius loci’ or spirits of a place, which in magical terms are more like elementals – forces of raw nature possessed of consciousness and some would even say intelligence.

It would seem that while Ancient Greece and Rome did not share our modern concept of a unique fairy race, the nymphs and demigods of field and stream were merely fairies under different names. Perhaps in the separation of Olympian god from local guardian spirits, we find the first evidence of Erlking and fairy.

The earliest surviving tales from Northern Europe date to around 2,000 ago. It is here the Alf, or Elves, are first mentioned.

The word Alf probably comes from the old German word for ‘white’ and as such recalls the White Goddess – described in the book of the same name by Robert Graves. It is remembered in sacred place names that survive today beginning Alb or Elbe. Britain was once called Albion and the Romans described it as a holy place, where druids from Gaul went to learn their craft.

The earliest Norse gods were the Vanir, lords and ladies of the wildwoods associated with nature, fertility and the ability to see the future. The Vanir are not known outside the far north of Europe, the edge of the retreating ice. They shared the land with their cousins, remembered as dwarfs, trolls and the Jotunn or giants of ice and fire. In some tales the Vanir are even called the children of the Jotunn. And often the Norse gods and goddess are described as being giants themselves.

The Aesir, the tribe of Thor, Odin and others, were immigrants from the east, which means they originated in ancient Mesopotamia. As their homeland was remembered as a place more fertile than any other, it is more than likely they came from early farming communities. Like the Annunaki Star-gods of the Sumerians, their sacred trees were the ash and the oak, so they were probably related.

Legends hint they migrated to the frozen north because they were fleeing something. One 13th century story says they were fleeing the fall of Troy. This is obviously a confused memory of a flight from persecution a few thousand years earlier, when the priests of the new god Marduk overthrew the ancient Annunaki Star-Gods and hunted them down.

When the Aesir and Vanir met there was a brutal war that abruptly ended in truce as the two tribes united. The Vanir retained their old association with nature, while Odin and his sons assumed leadership and defence. Their truce seems a reasonable compromise, especially if the Aesir brought with them the new technologies of farming and metalwork. But equally, to call a truce in the first place each side must have recognised some kinship with the other.

It is apparent both groups freely intermarried and interbred, as indeed they did with the Jotunn giants, the dwarves and trolls. The giants were forever trying to carry off goddesses from Asgard. Odin and Thor had affairs with giantesses and Frey married one. Like gods everywhere, they all bred freely with mortals, producing semi-divine children, such as daughters skilled in magic and fearless, heroic sons.

With the advent of Christianity the old gods were absorbed into the new religion or dismissed as objects of ridicule. The Irish fire goddess Bridget became Saint Bride; while the sun god became ‘little leaping Lugh’, a Leprechaun. Perhaps it was during this time the fairies began to leave behind their old association with pagan nymphs and godlings and adopt a new identity; one less provocative to a church that was becoming increasingly hostile to the old ways.

In the long run even a change of identity could not save the fairy race. In the long dark centuries ahead, they were accused of witchcraft and trafficking with the devil, and ultimately persecuted, tortured and killed.

Thank you for joining us today and thanks to Horatio for another fascinating look at the legends and myths of gods and fairies. Sally

 

Smorgasbord Guest writer – 19th June to 27th June – Author Horatio Grin – Biography.


It is clear that fairies seem to be trending at the moment and this rather enigmatic author, who is surrounded by mystery was recommended to me by Paul Andruss as being an authority on these mythical creatures…Horatio Grin has kindly agreed to let me use his series on other worldly creatures over the next week.. I am sure you will enjoy has much as I have.

To get the ball rolling I thought I would introduce Horatio with his bio and interesting back story along with the link to the website where he maintains a low web presence.. You will understand why when you read about his career.

Horatio William Grin was born 29 July 1940 in the village of Kingstone Warren, Oxfordshire, in the shadow of White Horse Hill. His parents were William George Grin, Barrister and latterly King’s Counsel and Beatrice Caroline Grin nee Lough, a younger daughter of Squire Horatio Arthur Lough of the Oxfordshire Loughs.

Tragedy struck the family in 1945 when Horatio’s 14 year old brother Vaughn went missing. As it was during the last months of the 2nd World War, it was immediately assumed the young man had fallen foul of a ring of German fifth columnists working in the area sabotaging the radar installations that nobody was supposed to know anything about.

The police found nothing to corroborate this wild theory. In the absence of a body, it was generally believed he had plunged into a sinkhole in the chalk hills and perished. Eventually, a local coroner recorded a verdict of death by misadventure.

Speculation over Vaughn’s fate continued to run wild for decades. The elderly and poorly educated of the district noted he was last seen in the vicinity of Dodd Lane. According to local tradition, Dodd Lane was a corpse road or fairy path, and so they naturally assumed the fair folk stole him.

The overgrown drovers’ road Dodd Lane is part of the series of Neolithic straight trackways forming the so called Ridgeway traversing the Oxfordshire hills between the ditch and bank earthworks of the old Iron Age fort of Uffington Castle and the Hill of the White Horse, where a large stylised image of a prancing horse is cut from the turf exposing the underlying chalk. It is believed the image dates all the way back to the Iron Age and may be a representation of the Celtic goddess Epona.

After matriculating from Whychwood and Rye School, where he stayed as a day boarder, Horatio Grin went up to Girton and Caius College at Cambridge to read Particulate Physics, graduating with First Class Honours. For his Masters he read Russian and Mandarin. Eschewing a career with his alma mater, he joined military intelligence at the age of 23. Little is known of him for the next twenty-five years except for small snippets from diverse sources.

H. W. Grin is credited as a Research Assistant in the abstract of a paper from a team headed by Professor Able Epstein of Cambridge University. Professor Epstein acted as a Senior Researcher at the Los Alomos Facility in New Mexico during the atomic bomb tests. The research paper is not particularly significant, a description of the projected paths of post-collision sub-atomic particles.

Certain members of the team later worked with Professor Epstein for Military Intelligence, during the Cold War. They investigated psychokinesis, which is the ability to move objects with the mind. Some of Professor Epstein’s research papers were recently published when restrictions under the Official Secrets Act expired. They do not however shed much illumination on the remainder of his still classified work.

A second mention comes from United Kingdom newspapers in the summer of 1978, during the kidnapping of the Italian Deputy Ambassador’s fourteen year-old daughter, Sophia. Sophia was recovered alive and well by a military intelligence team. No ransom was paid and there were no arrests. According to the newspapers the diplomatic liaison was Horatio Grin. A Horatio William Grin was awarded a CBE in the following New Year’s Honours List.

In 1981, Horatio Grin CBE became a partner in the firm of Chartered Accountants in Golden Square, Soho. This firm was later to become Grin, Pipe and Thynne, as Horatio Grin became the Senior Partner. From a small, comfortable domestic firm, the business expanded internationally and exponentially after Mr Grin’s arrival, even though the records of the Association of Chartered Accountants clearly show Mr Grin did not apply for full membership until sixth year of joining the practice.

In 1995 Mr Grin left the London Office, moving to the Malvern Hills to open a regional office with which to keep occupied during semi-retirement. Once again he attracted a considerable client list of landowners ranging from old gentry to celebrities, rock stars, bankers and industrialists, themselves in semi-retirement on newly acquired estates.

He became a leading figure in the community, known for his charitable work with the Magi, an organisation similar to the Rotary Club. The Magi were formed from the upper echelons of the Scottish Charted Accounting Societies; founded in the 1850s under the aegis of the Sinclair family, the owners of the famous Rosslyn Chapel.

Contemporary reports deem the Magi akin to Freemasons, although neither organisation ever publicly acknowledged affinity. Horatio Grin’s name features in two decades worth of the Annual Scripts of Concourse, which are held in the public archives of the United Grand Lodge of England at the Freemasons’ Hall in London. His membership of course is unconfirmed.

This seems to satisfactorily sum up Horatio Grin’s professional public life. However there is another side, private if not entirely hidden, and certainly occult, in the true sense of the word. Horatio Grin’s name features in the public member lists of Alpha et Omega and Stella Matutina Temples. Interestingly he was a member of both temples while working for MI5, suggesting his masters knew, and approved, of his involvement.

In 1969 his name features in the official documentation supporting Grady McMurtry’s elevation to the position of Frater Superior, the effective head of the Ordo Templi Orientis. After his signature is the glyph 6°=5□ signifying that he had attained the grade of Adeptus Major within the order of the Rosy Cross.

His name also appears in the published membership list of the Hermes Temple. In 1978 he travelled to New Zealand in order to participate in the closure of the Whare Ra Temple. In the Bills of Dissolution his glyph is shown as 8°=3□ indicating he had attained the rank of Temple Master. Again his name and Temple Master glyph appear on the Bills of Dissolution for Gnostic Catholic Church, which was restored to the aegis of the Ordo Templi Orientis in 1986.

It is with the Temple Master glyph that Horatio Grin, once again signs himself in his privately published alchemic works:
‘Initiation to the Metaverse’
‘Speaking to the Universe, a Description of Infinity’
‘The Mind of Matter’
‘A Chemycal Wedding, the Quantum theory of Alchemy’.

His latest work on fairy lore called ‘Fairies: a Hidden History, the Collected Essays of Horatio Grin’, again containing no publisher’s mark, is a series of articles rumoured to be from the Archives of the Magi Temple of Central England. The essays are remarkable for effortlessly marrying ancient mythology and fairy folklore with the latest discoveries in the scientific disciplines of archaeology, genetics and physics. They are currently the subject of controversy among different schools of occult thought.

Website: http://britishocculthistory.yolasite.com/

Please join me each day this week and then Monday and Tuesday next week to read more about this extraordinary writer.