Smorgasbord Health Column – Food in the News #Carbs – Don’t throw out the good ones!


I never recommend anybody give up one of the major food groups. There are some people who do require specialised diets that preclude certain foods within a group, such as gluten high grains. But that is far fewer than the multi-billion gluten free food industry would have you believe.

I eat moderate amounts of wholegrains each day. I am not as active as I used to be and don’t need them in the same quantity as I did at 35, but I still have whole grain Basmati rice with my main meal at least five days a week… with whole grain pasta on the other two.

Here are a few recent news stories about wholegrains and their nutritional value in our diet and then a brief overview of the benefits.

Eating wholegrains and high-fibre foods can actually help you maintain a LOWER weight, study finds

If you’re wanting to ditch the excess kilos, you may be contemplating a low-carb diet or cutting the food group out for good.

However, new research has shown that a diet that includes carbs – those that are unrefined and high in fibre – can actually help you lose weight.

A secondary analysis of research from the University of Wollongong found that grain quality is key, with whole grain, high-fibre foods being linked with lower weight.

Read the rest of the article: Study into obesity and wholegrains Daily Mail Article

All Hail the Whole Grain! By Jan Suszkiw March 15, 2018

A human nutrition study reaffirmed the health benefits of substituting whole-grain foods like whole-wheat bread, oatmeal, barley, rye, and brown or wild rice for refined-grain products like white bread in the diet.

Scientists with the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA)—jointly run by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts—conducted the study to clarify the role of whole grains in helping regulate weight, blood sugar levels and calorie (energy) use, among other benefits. Unlike refined grains, which undergo extensive milling or other processing, whole grains are sold for eating with their bran and other constituents intact—all rich in vitamins, minerals, fiber and other nutrients.

According to Susan Roberts, director of the Center’s Energy Metabolism Laboratory, the study was the first to strictly control participants’ diet, weight and type of whole-grain products they consumed. Previous clinical trials didn’t incorporate these important study design criteria, leaving the benefits of whole-grain diets—especially on weight management—open to being questioned.

In the eight-week study, published last year in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers determined the weights and energy intake needs of 81 participants (healthy, nonsmoking men and women ages 40 to 65) and started them on a diet free of whole grains. At week two, the researchers randomly switched some participants to diets containing the daily recommended allowance of whole grains (a minimum of three ounces for women and four ounces for men every day).

Read the rest of the article: US Dept of Agriculture

Carbohydrates – Not All are Demons – Smorgasbord Health.

Carbohydrates are a component of food that supplies us with energy in the form of calories to the body. Along with proteins and fats they provide the human body with the main elements required to be healthy. Carbohydrates are made up of sugars (simple carbohydrates), starches (complex carbohydrates) and fibre. If you take the fibre out of the formula through over processing you are just left with the sugars.. These are intense and result in blood glucose fluctuations. You may have experienced this for yourself after a heavy lunch with lots of white rice followed by a rich and sugary dessert. You become light headed and feel faint requiring a top up around 4pm in the afternoon!

To lower cholesterol levels naturally you need to eat carbohydrates that have retained the fibre element as this helps absorb some of the sugars and prevent blood glucose fluctuations.

Carbohydrates are not the demons that some would make out. They have essential elements that are required to make the perfect fuel mix for our bodies.

However,our requirement for carbohydrates will change as we get older. When we are children and young adults our growing bodies require a supercharged fuel – carbohydrates are also needed in higher concentration during periods of high activity as you get older but should be allied to that particular period of exercise. When men and women pass through the mid-life change the requirement certainly drops but levels again depend on how active your life style is.

If someone is a total couch potato drifting from bed to table, table to car, car to desk, desk to car, car to sofa – then putting a high octane fuel into the body will simply be converted to fat. However, stopping all carbohydrates is wrong – there are certain nutrients and fibre within wholegrain carbohydrates that the body needs so that the chemical balance is maintained.

You can read the rest of the post here with details on gluten and suggestions on how to include health wholgrains into your daily diet: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2015/02/03/the-cholesterol-myth-carbohydrates-not-all-are-demons/

And here is my preferred carbohydrate wholegrain rice.

Of all rice – any form of brown rice will contain more of the nutrients as it loses only the outer layer of the grain called the hull.

What vital nutrients are lost in processing wholegrain rice to the white used by the majority of consumers.

During the process that turns brown rice to white rice it loses 67% of its vitamin B3 (niacin) 80% of B1, 90% of B6 – half of its manganese and phosphorus, 60% of its iron and all the dietary fibre and essential fatty acids. Do you realise that to make white rice acceptable as a food it has to be artificially enriched with B1 B3 and iron? It is amazing the difference that processing a food can have on its nutritional content.

Brown rice is a very rich source of manganese –essential for blood health. It is also necessary for bone health and for it’s antioxidant capabilities in preventing damage to cells, particularly blood cells.

Brown rice is rich in fibre, which cleans the system of toxins and harmful deposits in the blood so helps keep your cholesterol down. Like oats it tends to release its energy slowly so maintaining stable blood sugar levels. The fibre is insoluble which means that it works through your system efficiently. This prevents some organs from getting into an overload situation like the liver and the bile duct – a speedy process through the system ensures that the bile duct does not secrete too much bile which can lead to gallstones.

Proteins like turkey are high in selenium but so is brown rice and it is very important for our immune systems and thyroid function – also to help prevent cancer as it encourages healthy DNA repair in the cells.

Magnesium is present in high quantities and this is associated with a number of systemic problems such as asthma – high blood pressure –migraine headaches and reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Magnesium does this because it helps to regulate nerve and muscle tone by balancing the action of calcium. You will see that very often calcium supplements are teamed with magnesium.

Calcium tends to rush around frantically and needs magnesium to curb its enthusiasm. For example if allowed to, calcium will overwhelm the nerve cells in the muscles and they become over activated. This causes the muscle to overwork and wear out faster. This occurs if you have insufficient magnesium in your diet. Another reason that magnesium is so important is for bone health and about two thirds of the magnesium is found in the bones of the human body. The rest is stored for when needed. Brown rice provides nearly a quarter of your daily requirement in one serving.

The human body is over 100,000 years old. In that time the body has developed an incredible defence mechanism called the survival instinct. In some cases it is miraculous. It is only in recent centuries that we have begun to refine our grains.

Recent researchers are maintaining that we ate few carbohydrates in the form of grain but I do dispute this. We would have eaten anything in our path that was in the least bit edible and certainly wild grains would have been a seasonal addition to the meat and fish that were hunted.

So our bodies spent the first 99,900 years eating whole-grains including rice. Wheat only came along about 10,000 years ago. During those many thousands of years our bodies evolved a very precise dietary support system that provided it with everything it needed to survive and be the fittest. It was essential for the survival of mankind that only the fittest made it through. This ensured that each generation was stronger.

If you go back to what I was saying about the loss of nutrients in the processing of brown rice to white rice you can perhaps understand why we are now facing the sort of medical problems that we are. We are depriving the body of not just a food group but the essential nutrients and energy that they provide.

You do not have to eat a plateful every day -for rice I would suggest two large tablespoons – it is actually very nice to have a cereal bowl of white rice with some warm milk and a banana for breakfast if you prefer a non-savoury option.

Brown rice needs to be prepared a little carefully – don’t get the easy cook as this has been partly processed. I suggest the real stuff, but put in a large glass bowl before cooking with cold water to cover it and whisk as hard as you can – then drain and then repeat until the water is clear. This gets rid of dust etc.

It takes a little more boiling than white rice and check after about 20 minutes until you get a slightly chewy and nutty tasting grain.

Use for any other dish that you would cook rice for. Curry, risotto, paella or mixed through a salad.

©sallycronin Just Food for Health 1998 – 2018

A little bit about me nutritionally.

A little about me from a nutritional perspective. Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 20 years ago. I qualified as a nutritional therapist and practiced in Ireland and the UK as well as being a consultant for radio. My first centre was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Here are my health books including a men’s health manual and my anti-aging book.

All available in Ebook fromhttp://www.amazon.com/Sally-Cronin/e/B0096REZM2

And Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sally-Georgina-Cronin/e/B003B7O0T6

Comprehensive guide to the body, and the major organs and the nutrients needed to be healthy 360 pages, A4: http://www.moyhill.com/html/just_food_for_health.html

Thank you for dropping in and if you have any questions fire away.. If you would like to as a private question then my email is sally.cronin@moyhill.com. I am only too pleased to help in any way I can. thanks Sally

 

Smorgasbord Health – IBS Part Three – Identifying Trigger Foods


This is the process that I used successfully for myself originally 20 years ago and also with my clients since then.. It may seem a real pain to keep a food diary and to pay so much attention to what you are eating, but it will pay off when you have either reduced your IBS symptoms or discovered the cause of the disease.

Intermittent Fasting.

In the last couple of years there has been a lot of press about Intermittent Fasting. The theory behind the concept is that by restricting your eating to within certain time periods that it gives your body a chance to process your food efficiently and also to rest the major organs active in the digestive system.

There are a couple of choices. You can have two days a week where you only have 500 calories during the day with fluids and then you eat normally for five days (by normally I do mean a balanced diet). Or you can do what I do and that is eating within an 8 hour window every day.

I have lost weight, regained my appetite, and I have lost my sugar cravings. This of course does not mean you have a free licence to eat anything you like.. But you can still have a pizza or a night out once or twice a week provided the rest of the time you are eating with Cook From Scratch firmly in place.

As to IBS symptoms.. After a year I can now have the occasional home baked or fresh made bread from the in house bakery in the store once or twice a week. I enjoy a glass of wine or gin and tonic at the weekend and I can enjoy most things as long as it is not a regular feature.

Stress

As I pointed out in the other posts on IBS, stress has been recognised as a contributory factor in the condition.  When you are keeping your food diary it is important to also make a note of out of the ordinary events or activities that resulted in an increase in symptoms.

Programme to identify your food triggers that result in IBS symptoms.

WEEK ONE – The aim is to reduce inflammation and cramps and increase intestinal flora.

Grains are all out for the first week. You will be getting sufficient carbohydrates from vegetables and fruit. You will start to re-introduce from week two, one grain at a time.

Dairy is out for the first week – you will introduce butter week two, milk week three and cheese week four. Calcium will come from vegetables, canned fish etc. If you can abide the taste of organic soymilk then fine but make sure no added sugar!  If you have symptoms after using a dairy alternative stop taking.

No alcohol for six weeks or any other processed packets, cans or bottles of sauces of any kind including mayonnaise.

One coffee per day in the morning but note any intestinal symptoms 30 – 60 minutes after eating. The oil content in caffeinated coffee can cause diarrhoea so try decaffeinated. Tea – black without milk – Green tea – very good and peppermint tea – great for spasms and cramps.

FOOD YOU CAN EAT WEEK ONE.

Vegetables – for first week or two avoid cabbage or cauliflower as nutritious but can increase wind. At least five a day of spinach, broccoli, watercress, Rucula lettuce, courgettes, leeks, onions, (every day) mushrooms (shitake are excellent) garlic (fresh if possible) carrots, parsnips, swede, potatoes, butternut squash (carbohydrates), tomatoes, (see how you feel the next day as pips in tomatoes can cause a problem if you suffer from diverticulitis), red peppers, peeled cucumber, half an avocado per day. Flavour with a little olive oil and herbs or spices. Balsamic vinegar with some olive oil and herbs makes a good salad dressing.

Fruit –At least two per day – bananas (helps both diarrhoea and constipation) oranges, lemons, apples, pears, grapes, berries of all kinds, plums, melon. Avoid dried fruit in week one.

Meat and poultry – any unprocessed Lamb, pork, chicken, turkey, beef, and duck. Eggs any way you wish. If you are not using milk you can still make scrambled egg and omelettes by whisking the whites first. Use the microwave or a pan with a little olive oil.

Fish – at least three times a week. –Salmon fresh and canned (mash the soft bones in for added calcium) tuna, sardines, halibut and any other fish. Give shelled fish such as prawns, crab and lobster a miss for week one and two and then introduce one a week.

Oils – Standard Olive oil or sunflower for all cooking and extra virgin olive oil for dressings – mix with herbs and spices like garlic to drizzle over jacket potatoes and salad. Do not fry with olive oil alone, add some sunflower oil and do not burn.

Examples of meals.

Breakfast. Water on rising or juice of a lemon in hot water – leave at least 30 minutes before eating if you can.

Spanish omelette with two eggs, chopped potatoes, tomatoes and onion (chop the night before and keep in fridge)

Fruit salad with fresh pressed juice on top.

Poached egg on spinach with half an avocado.

Lunchtime

Homemade vegetable soup – no stock but you can add seasoning and salt. For example butternut squash and carrot – if you can find a fresh made soup without sugar and preservatives then go for it.

Large salad with egg, avocado tinned salmon or sardines with chopped potato and balsamic dressing.

Jacket potato with drizzle of olive oil and a tin of tuna or salmon.

Dinner

Meat, fish or chicken all fresh – green vegetables – carrots and potatoes – use olive oil and herbs and spices over the vegetables.

Snacks between meals.

Fruit, nuts and seeds.

If at the end of week one you are still experiencing severe symptoms drop the fruit and repeat week one.

WEEK TWO – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS

You can introduce oats every other day – porridge with a banana and a small cup of whole milk. You can also put a dash of milk in your tea and coffee. No more than 250ml per day. If you symptoms worsen drop the milk and stay with the oats.

WEEK THREE – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS

You can introduce corn and brown rice – corn tortillas and substitute every other meal with two tablespoons of brown rice.

You can also start to use some butter to drizzle over vegetables etc.

WEEK FOUR – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS.

Cabbage, Brussel sprouts, cauliflower (check for increase in symptoms). Also a couple of ounces of cheese every other day.

You can introduce rye – Ryvita will add some variety to snacks and lunches.

WEEK FIVE – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS

You can introduce wheat again – try reduced sugar Irish soda bread – one slice per day. It is at this point that you want to pay particular attention to your symptoms over 48 hours. If you notice an increase you are probably gluten intolerant which means that certainly for the conceivable future you need to only eat gluten free products. Gluten is not just in bread of course, it is in many processed foods and meats such as sausages and in sauces.

You can have good quality yoghurt every other day. Note any increase in symptoms.

WEEK SIX – ALL OF THE ABOVE PLUS

You can introduce whole grain pasta – make simple sauces from scratch like tomato and basil etc.

You can have a glass of red wine three days apart – watch for increase in symptoms.

By now you should be very aware of how your body and more importantly your intestines are reacting to the food you are eating. This is not a weight loss exercise although those who are overweight will lose some but those who have been starving themselves out of desperation will put it on.

As I mentioned earlier – you can extend each phase to two weeks. The key is to make sure that you keep an accurate record of both food intake and symptoms.

SUPPLEMENTS.

There is a huge debate as to the effectiveness of supplements. You should be now getting most of which you need to obtain the necessary nutrients but there are a few that I find very useful in speeding up the process.

Peppermint capsules Peppermint tea is great an hour after you have eaten, but I find that two peppermint capsules after breakfast help with cramps and digestion in general. However, in some people peppermint can cause symptoms so note any of these. Also be careful of over the counter IBS medication as they nearly all have peppermint.

Acidophilus capsules at least 3billion active cultures. This helps give your intestinal bacteria a kick start. They are quite expensive and good quality is vital. Take as directed but I have found that 2 per day to start with, after breakfast and dinner are helpful. You can drop this to one a day after a period of time. (see Part Two that tells you which foods are high in natural probiotics)

Aloe Vera gel this is highly nutritious and provided you begin slowly you may find it will help with symptoms, reduce the cramping and give you a boost. I start with a teaspoon a day before breakfast and graduate up to a dessert spoon twice a day over a two week period. After that you can increase to the recommended dosage on the product. I take through the winter months as I find it a great help when I am not getting any sunshine. You should be able to find a local agent but most have online shops who supply Forever Living which is about the best quality.

Multi-vitamin supplement-If you are suffering from a basic nutritional deficiency then do go to one of the larger health food chains and ask their advice regarding the best multi-vitamin that they have. You want one that is yeast and sugar free and liquid might be best to get you started rather than demand your overworked intestines try to process anything else. The liquid will also be absorbed faster and easier.  As I get older and particularly through the winter months I find that taking a B-complex supplement helps me.

So those are the basics.

Six to twelve weeks to perhaps discover the one or two foods that might be the cause of all your misery. A time to rest your digestive system and encourage your healthy bacteria in your gut and also stimulate the natural muscular activity to restart.

I hope that you will find that this is not a starvation programme but one that you can enjoy, experiment with and learn how what you eat does impact your health.

Having improved your symptoms – you may well have to make minor adjustments going forward – it might be gluten free – sugar reduced – dairy alternatives – but all are worth the price if you are free of symptoms and stress. If there are foods that will always cause you a problem you will find that there are many that will not. A small sacrifice to have the freedom from the symptoms of IBS.

On that note, as you begin to feel better and have the urge to exercise, find something that enables you to relax and be calm – leave the marathon running and the extreme sports for a while!

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to comment here or contact me privately through my About Me on the blog.

Here are Part One and Part Two of the series.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2015/04/28/smorgasbord-health-irritable-bowel-syndrome-stop-and-rewind/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2015/04/29/smorgasbord-health-irritable-bowel-syndrome-part-two-strategies/

Smorgasbord Health – Irritable Bowel Syndrome – Part Two – Strategies


Yesterday I outlined the basics of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and today a look at some of the nutrients that your intestine needs to work efficiently and also some of the triggers for the condition.

For some people the discovery that their favourite food – bread, pasta etc. is causing their discomfort, will be upsetting. We are lucky that in most cases there are alternatives and for some there is a management solution, where the food can be eaten in small amounts very infrequently.

To identify which foods are triggers for an IBS episode you need to complete a six week programme or better still extended to 12 weeks following each stage for two weeks. Nutritionally that is not a problem – two weeks without grains may be difficult but provided you are obtaining carbohydrates from other sources you should find you have plenty of energy.

The key is to listen to your body and to keep notes each day on symptoms and how you feel in general – keep a food diary, as this will provide you with the blueprints for your new diet going forward.

NUTRIENTS NEEDED TO HELP SUPPORT THE INTESTINES FUNCTION.

A broad spectrum of nutrients is required to enable the body to function and it is important that you eat a wide variety of foods to provide them. This is particularly important when your intestines are not working efficiently and only partially processing the food you eat. There are blogs on some of the nutrients in the archive but here are some that you should make sure you are consuming in food rather in supplemental form, as the body is designed to extract what it needs from natural sources rather than pills.

Cook from scratch and avoid all processed foods including sauces, ketchups, mayonnaise etc. Even the savoury kinds are full of sugar and additives that can irritate a sensitive gut. You should be eating lots of vegetables, some sugar reduced fruits and lean protein. Try not to eat very large meals that require a great deal of processing. Smaller portions with a gap of around 2 hours minimum between eating.

Some specific nutrients and food elements that are helpful for your gut.

Calcium (helps control diarrhoea) sardines, dark leafy vegetables, sardines, tinned salmon, beans, fruit such as figs and oranges, nuts and dairy if not lactose intolerant – in which case use lactose free alternative.  Calcium needs Magnesium and Vitamin D to be absorbed efficiently.

Magnesium (helps relieve constipation) Pumpkin seeds, Halibut, beans, wholegrain rice, avocados spinach.

Vitamin D acts more like a hormone and is essential for a wide range of reactions in the body. The best source of the vitamin is direct contact on the skin for at least 45 minutes a day (not to burn) but also from specific foods such as egg yolks, fatty fish like salmon and liver.

Fibre, to slow down the digestive process and allow normal absorption of nutrients and fluids from food – all vegetables and fruit.

Iron (for energy and blood health) Green leafy vegetables, fish and meat, beans, nuts, bananas.

Also anti-bacterial agents such as green tea, garlic and onions to restrict Candida growth

Peppermint tea 60 minutes after meals to reduce the cramps, spasms and pain if you are not intolerant to peppermint. You can also use peppermint oil but it is very strong and just one drop in a large glass of water is more than enough.

Some foods that can be hidden.

There is a link, as I have already mentioned, between certain foods and strong contender is gluten.The clue is in the name and comes from the Latin word for Glue!  It is a protein present in wheat and some other grains such as barley and rye.  Although not inherently present in other grains such as oats, they can become contaminated if they are processed in a mill that also works with wheat and the other grains. Gluten gives that elastic feel to bread dough and it also helps it rise.

I have not experienced a problem with wholegrain rice but it can be harsh on the intestines if you are going through an episode of IBS.. I suggest that you only have one or two tablespoons I find if I mix wholegrain with Basmati rice that is a gentler mix.

Grains are not just in cereals and bread but in many processed products including hamburgers, soups, sausages, processed meats, crisps and ready meals.

Refined Sugars are a real problem for IBS sufferers, particularly with the strong link to Candida, and it is important that you avoid refined sugar completely and also your intake of processed foods. Even savoury foods contain high levels of sugar as do breakfast cereals, jams, biscuits etc.

Here is the posts for Candida and sugars that you should read if you have IBS symptoms.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/sugars-and-candida-2015-2/

FLUIDS.

Water is important to help hydrate the body, particularly after IBS symptoms such as diarrhoea, and also to flush toxins from the body. However – you don’t need to drink litres as this will only cause a flushing effect. It will push any food you eat rapidly through the system – drinking two litres a day in delayed bursts is fine as most of the fruit and vegetables have a high fluid content too. I use a 2litre mineral water bottle – with tap water and make sure I drink throughout the day at intervals before and after meals.

Drink a glass of water when you get up and then 45 minutes before each meal. Leave at least an hour after eating before drinking anything so that the gastric juices in your stomach have a chance to digest the food you have eaten. It is better to leave two hours if you can.

JUICING.

If you are naturally pressing juices yourself than that is fine – one glass per day. Try to stick to vegetable with a small amount of fruit to taste- I actually enjoy a carrot juice with a small amount of blueberries. Store bought tend to have additives but you can find juice bars that will press a selection for you.

ALCOHOL IS SUGAR

I love a glass of wine or a shot of whisky but for this re-establishment of good bacteria in your intestinal system you need to give up for the six weeks. You can re-introduce in week six – just one glass and then limit intake and watch for any increase in symptoms.

PROBIOTICS

Our body is a rich soup of bacteria and yeasts, many that are needed for all the processing that is taking place continuously. Probiotics are the good guys and are beneficial for your digestive system especially when it is struggling to maintain a healthy balance.

You can find in foods which is obviously the best way for your body to utilise the bacteria. And whilst I would caution the use of some commericial live yogurts that can contain too much sugar and additives you can make your own at home.

I sometimes take Kefir which is a fermented dairy combination of goat’s milk and fermented kefir grains. High in lactobacilli and bifidus bacteria and antioxidants you will find in better supermarkets and also in your local health store.

Fermented foods are your other option including pickles,Sauerkraut, pickled red cabbage etc.  Also Japanese Miso soup which anyone who is familiar with macrobiotic cooking will be familiar with. It is again fermented and made from rye, beans and usually rice or barley.

Supplemental probiotics

I do take certain specific supplements when needed and one of these is a high quality probiotic. Whilst food should always be the first source of the nutrients that we need on a daily basis, there are times, such as during the recovery from an illness, when additional support is needed.

I take one probiotic capsule a day for maintenance and two when I feel I need extra help. You must keep in the fridge when opened and it needs to be of adequate strength. The one I use has 3billion active cultures and ask advice in the pharmacy or the health shop to find the most effective one for your specific needs.

If you are taking broad spectrum antibiotics, you either should wait until you have finished since they are designed to kill off all bacteria including any you might take in supplementation form, or you can get specific probiotics that are effective when taken in conjunction with antibiotics.

Tomorrow’s post The six week programme.

The aim of this programme is to reduce the symptoms that you are currently experiencing and to repopulate your intestines with the healthy bacteria needed for your body to function.

You only know if something is working if you keep a record. So to start you should write down all your symptoms and over the six weeks keep a journal – were there days when you noticed an increase or decrease in symptoms– what did you eat in the last 24 hours. Did you re-introduce a grain or dairy etc?

This will also help you in the future when you perhaps relapse and you can look back and perhaps identify a food or habit that might have crept back in.

I will also give you foods you can eat and when to reintroduce suspected triggers for symptoms.

Here is yesterday’s part one on IBS

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2015/04/28/smorgasbord-health-irritable-bowel-syndrome-stop-and-rewind/