Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – January 17th – 23rd 2022 – Hits 1986, Nat King Cole, Winter Sun destinations, Healthy Eating, Book Reviews, Funnies


Welcome to the round up with the posts from the week you might have missed.

A grey overcast day here in Ireland but at least it is dry and in fact I might have to water the pot plants in the front of the house which is almost unheard of during the winter months!

Not a great deal to report on the home front. I am just waiting until the end of the month to book my hotels for my planned trip to the UK for my sister’s 80th. We are still around the 6,000 mark here and the UK hovering around the 100,000. Hopefully that downward trend will continue in the next couple of weeks. Some of the paperwork, tests etc are being lifted from Monday.. they were put in place to prevent the spread of Omicron but that ship has sailed. There are murmurs about other variants but the general premis is that we are going to have to live with it. I am as boosted as I can be including the flu jab and have my travel permit, fingers crossed.

I did get out and about during the week and was delighted to be the guest of award winning author Janice Spina for an interview. Janice also very kindly reviewed Life is Like a Mosaic… so a double pleasure.

Interview with Author Sally Cronin

It is such a pleasure to welcome a fellow author to Interview an Author on Jemsbooks.blog. Today, please help me welcome talented author/poet/nutritionist Sally Cronin!

Thank you so much, Sally, for coming today to share a little bit about yourself and your lovely books. I am excited to have you here! The floor is yours! 

Head over to join us: Interview and review with Janice Spina

As ever I am very grateful for the contributions by William Price King, Debby Gies and Carol Taylor and I hope you will check out their posts and enjoy the music, travel and food.

And thank you for dropping in and reading, liking, commenting and sharing the posts.. it keeps me motivated.

On with the show….

Chart Hits 1986 Part Two – Peter Gabriel, Billy Ocean, The Bangles, Lionel Richie

William Price King meets the Jazz Icons – Nat King Cole – The 1950s

Three Winter Sun Destinations – Kauai, Hawaii, Malta and Martinique

Cook from Scratch to prevent nutritional deficiency – Vitamin B1 – Wholegrains, Mackeral, Pork, Pineapple, Eggs, Asparagus

#Winning Streak – The Charity Shop

Winning Streak – The Date

Tales from the Garden – The Santuary

The Gentle Detox – Part Three – Pre-Weight Loss – Willpower booster

#Interview Annika Perry on Priorhouse, #Writing Traci Kenworth, #Characters D.Wallace Peach, #Review Robbie Cheadle, #Writerlinks D.G. Kaye, #Stories Allan Hudson

Oh Baubles: A Christmas Romance Novella by Harmony Kent

#Christmas #Romance – Love Me by Jacquie Biggar

New Book on the Shelves – #Biography #WWI, Queen Victoria, #Adventures, Lucky Jack by S. Bavey

Personal Recommendations – #Paranormal Robbie Cheadle, #Western #Romance Sandra Cox, #Fantasy C.S. Boyack

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Pizza, Coffee and Breaking and Entering

January 20th 2022 – Another Open Mic Night with author Daniel Kemp – Eye openers and Husbanding

 

Thanks for dropping in and have a lovely week ahead   Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Weekly Round Up – January 3rd- 9th 2022 – Innovations,Travel, Chart hits 1985, Healthy Eating, Books, Reviews and Humour


Welcome to the round up of posts you might have missed this week.

A strange bitty week with weather… a bit of sun, a bit of snow, a bit of wind… but a great deal of rain. We are lucky, as I know large parts of Europe and North America have been getting frozen blasts and metres of snow.

The first week of 2022 and some milestone birthdays in the family with David’s 70th next Tuesday and my sister’s 80th in February. We were laughing the other day about how we never thought one day we would be talking about events and people from over 60 years ago. Also how many iconic events have taken place in our lifetimes, and what amazing inventions we have incorporated into our everyday lives in the last century. Here are just a few that gives us reason to be grateful to be born in this day and age…. despite the current covid pandemic, which could be a great deal worse if not for the medical knowledge and scientific breakthroughs of the last 50 years in particular.

  • Clearly space travel and landing on the moon was monumental.
  • Listening to music moving through cassette tapes, CDs to digital downloads.
  • Mobile phones – smart phones
  • Computers – laptops – notebooks
  • Microwave ovens
  • Worldwide web
  • Digital cameras
  • 3D printers
  • Sliced bread (1928)
  • Advanced anaesthetics
  • The first transplants of heart, liver and kidneys
  • Development of the artificial heart
  • Vaccines that have virtually eradicated smallpox, polio, TB, Typhoid, Yellow Fever, Scarlet Fever, Maleria and Diptheria.

I choose to be positive about the coming year with this very small selection of brilliant innovations from the last century behind us, and far more to come I am sure.

Tomorrow sees the start of the first feature from the new Smorgasbord Bookshelf where you will find all the authors and their books that I personally recommend along with one of my reviews for their books. Click the link to discover the authors currently on the shelves.

My intention is to read some of the older books of these authors in the coming year, as well as new releases, and I will change the reviews out as I post them.

I have some new authors that I am also planning to read and I will add those to the shelves too.

In this first feature I will be sharing bios, book covers and my review for all the authors presently on the shelves. There will be more regular features during the year including a Summer and Christmas Book Fair.

New book releases.

If you have a new book being released in the next few weeks please let me know the date if on pre-order or available so that I can create a promotion for you.

There are two links for new books released this week further down in the post to give you an idea of how they would look. One is for a new author to the bookshelf and the other for a resident author Email me on sally.cronin@moyhill.com so we can chat about what I need and dates etc.

As always my thanks to William Price King, who as well as joining me on The Breakfast Show, joins us on Fridays with his series Meet the Music Greats and Jazz Icons. To D.G Kaye whose Travel Column I am resharing through the first half of the year and to Carol Taylor with our joint series Cook from Scratch to prevent nutritional deficiency.

Time to get on with the show….

The Breakfast Show with William Price King and Sally Cronin – Chart Hits 1985 Part Two – Tears for Fears, USA for Africa, Jennifer Rush, Katrina & The Waves

The #Travel Column Rewind with D.G. Kaye – Safe Vacation Travel – Restrictions, Paperwork, Insurance, Price Checking, Tagging.

Vitamin A – Carrots, Liver, Apricots, Trout. Eggs, Frittata

The Wedding Day

The Nanny

The Gentle Detox – Introduction and Phase One – Before you begin your weight loss programme

#Shortstory – #Supernatural – Breathless by Yvette Calleiro

#EpicFantasy – Demon Seed: Book Three of New Blood (New Blood Saga) by W.D. Kilpack III

#Preorder – #Military #Romance – Jagged Feathers (The White Rune Series Book 2) by Jan Sikes

Funnies, Story Reading Ape, Moon Blessings Colleen Chesebro, #Mercury D.G. Kaye, #Bookreviews Jacquie Biggar, #Shrimp New Vintage Kitchen, #Customerservice John Howell.

The Senior Team pass the the funnies along – Liars and Social Distancing

 

Thanks for dropping in and I hope you will join me again next week… Sally.

Smorgasbord Health Column – Weekly Grocery Shopping List by Nutrient – Part One – Vitamins A – B


Last week I shared my year of living without sugar my year of living without sugar and the results, eating a diet of low to moderate glycemic foods with some high glycemic ones thrown in for good measure. I am certainly not on a crash diet and in fact I am eating more variety than ever before.

I am not posting my usual weight loss series this year, for the simple reason that most of you understand that I don’t believe in crash dieting and that your body deserves more respect than to starve it of the nutrients it needs to be healthy.

I believe in eating, and eating all food groups, just moderating the amount that you eat based on your requirements. Your body knows how to process fresh food, raw and cooked from scratch. It is not designed to extract nutrients from manufactured foods which includes the majority that come in a packet, jar or can.

Most of the lifestyle diseases we suffer from and overburden the health service with are related to the fuel we put into our bodies. Unfortunately, unlike the mechanic who services my car, and understands what the correct fuel mix for its engine is required, most doctors do not have a clue about the fuel the body needs and this is reflected in the number of pills that we as a population are consuming at an increasingly alarming rate.

With that in mind here is part one of a shopping list that your body might write if it was capable. It does try to tell you that it is missing elements that it needs which is when you are sick.

Last year we ran a new series on nutrients and the symptoms of deficiency.. and Carol Taylor provided very tasty recipes using ingredients to make sure you don’t lack certain vital vitamins and minerals. Cook from Scratch to avoid Nutritional Deficiency with Sally Cronin and Carol Taylor

The alternative shopping list by nutrient that the body needs to be healthy – Part One

We usually compile our shopping list based on our preferences, tastes and sometimes pocket. But I have a slightly different method that you might find useful.

The chemical interactions within our body that are essential for life – including the healthy functioning of our immune system – are only made possible by the raw ingredients in our diet. Even if you are having the occasional food fest, if your basic diet contains the right raw ingredients it won’t matter to your body.

It is the everyday ingestion of sugars, Trans fats and white starches that cripple the system – I follow the 80/20 rule. If 80% of the time your body is getting what it needs, 20% of the time you can have what your heart and taste buds would like too.

You can ring the changes within the nutritional ingredients, and whilst it is a good idea to eat seasonally,we now have access to a great many varieties of exotic fruits that give added benefit to our diets including the powerhouse, for example, that is the Avocado.

I hope you will find plenty of foods that you enjoy on this list and will incorporate others you are less familiar with so that you get plenty of variety.

First a little more about vitamins and their sources

Water Soluble Vitamins

These include all the B vitamins, vitamin C as well as Folic Acid. They are not easily stored in the body and are often lost in cooking or by being eliminated from the body. This means that they must be consumed in constant daily amounts to prevent deficiencies. In the case of Vitamin C this could lead to poor immune system function and if you are deficient in the B vitamins you will not be able to metabolise the fat, protein and carbohydrates that you eat.

Fat Soluble Vitamins.

These vitamins include A, D, E and K. Because they are soluble in fat they tend to be stored in the body’s fat tissues, fat cells and liver. This means that they should be supplemented with care if you are already taking in plenty on a daily basis in your diet. In excess even supposedly beneficial nutrients can be toxic and this is why you always should adjust your diet first before taking in additional supplements.

First the basic nutrients we need for energy and healthy functioning systems and organs. If you would like to explore each of the nutrients in more detail you can find in the link next to the foods.

Vitamins and anti-oxidants – A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B9 (Folate) B12, C, D, E, K,

Minerals – Calcium, chloride, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium, zinc.

Amino Acids – Essential Fatty AcidsBioflavonoids – very strong anti-oxidants.

Quite a few foods fall into several categories so I will give you the top sources within the groups- these are the foods that should make up your basic shopping with seasonal fruits and vegetables when available.

For example, spinach has Vitamin A, B1, B2, B9, E, calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese and potassium – (Popeye knew what he was doing)

Here is the shopping list to select foods from for each of the nutrients.

Vitamin A or Retinol was actually the first of the fat-soluble vitamins to be identified, in the States in 1913.  It is only found in animal sources but some plants contain compounds called carotenoids, which give fruit and vegetables their red, orange and yellow colours.  The body can convert some of these carotenoids including beta-carotene into Vitamin A. Find out more about this nutrient: Vitamin A – Retinal or Beta Carotene

Vitamin A – from plants:carrots, red peppers, sweet potato, apricots, broccoli, cantaloupe melon, nectarines, peaches and spinach. Cashew nuts. Vitamin A – from animal sources: Liver, meat, fish, fish oils, free range eggs and dairy.

Vitamin B1- Thiamin

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) is a water-soluble vitamin. This means that along with the other B vitamins and Vitamin C it travels through the blood stream and any excess is eliminated in our urine. The body cannot store thiamin but it is found in tissues within the body such as in the liver, heart, kidneys and the nervous system where it binds to enzymes. This does mean that these types of vitamins need to be replaced from our food continuously. Find out more about this nutrient: Vitamin B1 Thiamin

Vitamin B1 sources –whole grains such as brown rice, oats and whole wheat cereals and bread, beans, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, nuts, pineapple, watermelon, asparagus, spinach, squash, lentils, beans, peanuts as well as oily fish, eggs, lean ham and pork.

Vitamin B2 – Riboflavin

Like the other B vitamins, B2 plays an important role in energy production by ensuring the efficient metabolism of the food that we eat in the form of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. It plays a key role in our nutritional processes such as its help in processing amino acids. It is also vital for the uptake of iron to find out more about this nutrient: Vitamin B2 -Riboflavin

Vitamin B2 sources – All green leafy vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, asparagus, mushrooms, almonds, fish, milk, eggs, wholegrains, wheat germ, liver and kidney

Vitamin B3 is also known in different forms as Niacin, Nicotinic Acid, Nicotinamide and Nicinamide. When the vitamin was first discovered it was called nicotinic acid but there was a concern that it would be associated with nicotine in cigarettes, leading to the false assumption that somehow smoking might provide you with nutrients. It was decided to call it Niacin instead. It works with other nutrients, particularly B1, B2, B5, B6 and biotin to break the carbohydrates, fats, and proteins in food down into energy. B3 itself is essential in this process and it goes further by aiding in the production of hydrochloric acid in the stomach to aid the digestion of food. It is actually involved in over 40 metabolic functions which shows how important it is in our levels of energy on a daily basis. To find out more about this nutrient: Vitamin B3 Niacin

Vitamin B3 sources Asparagus, broccoli, spinach, mushrooms, potatoes, tomatoes, sunflower seeds, wholegrain bread and cereals. Chicken, Lamb, Turkey, Salmon, tuna, Venison, eggs and cheese.

Vitamin B5Pantothenic acid 

Like the other B vitamins, B5 plays an important role in the conversion of carbohydrates into glucose, which is burned to produce energy. These nutrients are also needed to breakdown fats and proteins as well as promoting the health of the nervous system, skin, hair, eyes and importantly this month, the liver. Vitamin B5 has a number of roles in the body some more critical than others. One job that is vitally important is assisting in the manufacture of red blood cells as well as sex and stress related hormones. To find out more about this nutrient: B5 – Pantothenic Acid

Vitamin B5 sources – Organic (non GMO) Corn, Cauliflower, Shitake Mushrooms, Brewer’s yeast, avocado, duck,  Organic (non- GMO) soybeans, lobster and strawberries.

B6 is a water-soluble vitamin that exists in three major chemical forms: Pyridoxine, pyridoxal and pyridoxamine B6 plays such a crucial role in so many functions of the body that a deficiency can have a huge impact on your health. It is required for over 100 enzymes that metabolise the protein that you eat. Along with the mineral Iron, it is essential for healthy blood. The nervous and immune systems also require vitamin B6 to function efficiently. It is also necessary for our overall feeling of well being as it converts the amino acid tryptophan, which is essential for the production of neurotransmitters such as serotonin in the brain. Without B6 you would not be able to manufacture haemoglobin to carry oxygen around the body. Find out more about this nutrient B6 Pyridoxine – Blood Health and Depression

Sources for vitamin B6 – wholegrain carbohydrates like brown rice, porridge oats, walnuts and sunflower seeds, bananas, avocados, salmon and tuna, dried fruit such as prunes and raisins, eggs, wheatgerm, poultry and meats such as lamb.

Vitamin B12 (Cyanocolbalamin) is an essential water-soluble vitamin but unlike other water soluble vitamins that are normally excreted in urine very quickly, B12 accumulates and gets stored in the liver (around 80%), kidney and body tissues.

  • B12 is vital for the efficient working of every cell in the body especially those with a rapid turnover as it prevents cell degeneration.
  • It functions as a methyl donor and works with folic acid in the manufacture of DNA and red blood cells.
  • B12 is necessary to maintain the health of the insulating sheath (myelin sheath) that surrounds all nerve cells.
  • It is involved in the production of melatonin, the hormone responsible for resetting our biological clock’s rhythm when we change to new time zones, and also helps us sleep
  • To find out more about this nutrient: B12 Cyanocolbalamin for cell health, DNA and sleep

Sources for Vitamin B12B12 is present in meats apart from offal, eggs and dairy products. It is better to drink a cold glass of full fat milk than to eat yoghurt as the fermentation process destroys most of the B12 as does boiling milk. One of the best sources is Marmite with 25% of your daily requirement in one 5gm serving…

There are very few sources, if any of B12 in plants, although some people do believe that eating fermented Soya products, sea weeds and algae will provide the vitamin. However analysis of these products shows that whilst some of them do contain B12 it is in the form of B12 analogues which are unable to be absorbed by the human body.

I hope that you have found this useful, and at the end of the three part series I will post a complete shopping list for you to copy and print off.

©Sally Cronin Just Food for Health 1998 – 2020

I am a qualified nutritional therapist with twenty- two years experience working with clients in Ireland and the UK as well as being a health consultant on radio in Spain. Although I write a lot of fiction, I actually wrote my first two books on health, the first one, Size Matters, a weight loss programme 20 years ago, based on my own weight loss of 154lbs. My first clinic was in Ireland, the Cronin Diet Advisory Centre and my second book, Just Food for Health was written as my client’s workbook. Since then I have written a men’s health manual, and anti-aging programme, articles for magazines and posts here on Smorgasbord.

If you would like to browse by health books and fiction you can find them here: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/my-books-and-reviews-2019-2020/