Smorgasbord Health Column – Nutrient in the News – Vitamin D and Irritable Bowel Syndrome


Part of my work as a nutritional therapist involves keeping up to date with new research. Even though I am no longer working with clients on a one to one basis, I like to make sure that my posts and books are updated regularly.

Those of you who are regulars to my health posts will know that I am passionate about communicating the fact that those of us living in northern climates with limited sun exposure are at a risk of Vitamin D deficiency. This is more so for children who spend less time than ever outdoors playing in sunlight or even daylight.

This research was featured recently in Science News.

Vitamin D supplements could help to ease painful Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) symptoms, a new study from the University of Sheffield has found.

Scientists from the University’s Department of Oncology and Metabolism reviewed and integrated all available research on vitamin D and IBS — a condition which affects two in 10 people in the UK.

The study showed a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in IBS patients — regardless of their ethnicity.

The Sheffield team also assessed the possible benefits of vitamin D supplements on IBS symptoms. Whilst they believe more research still needs to be conducted, their findings suggested supplements may help to ease symptoms which can include abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and constipation. Vitamin D was shown to have the most benefit on quality of life in IBS.

Read the rest of the article: Science Daily Vitamin D

Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

I high percentage of my clients over the years have been suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome. It is a health issue that affects millions of men, women and children worldwide. There is a massive amount of information out there on the condition and it can become confusing as to the why, how and what to do about it when it effects us personally.

Stop and Rewind.

I am afraid if there is a disease with a syndrome in the title it means that the professionals really do not know the why, how and what to do either! In diseases like this symptoms are lumped together and given them a collective name. As in Irritable Bowel Syndrome……..

In working with men, women and children who have these symptoms for the last 20 years I too cannot give you a definitive cause. However, I have found it useful to stop and rewind.

Infant years

It helps if you have a parent alive who can tell you if you were a colic prone baby, cried a great deal, demanded a bottle frequently but failed to put weight on and thrive and had several stomach upsets. This is probably due to lactose intolerance – milk sugar basically which is in human milk and then of course dairy which babies tend to be weaned onto.

Anti-biotics

If that was not the case then I would look at anti-biotic prescription from as early as the client could determine. If not then would track back to when the early stage symptoms of intestinal issues first presented. I could track mine to age 11 when I had six courses of anti-biotics before finally having my tonsils removed. I put on three stone in three months and developed an unhealthy addiction to sugar.

Hormonal imbalance, dieting, lifestyle

Then teenage years – hormonal fluctuations or prescription drugs such as those for acne that might have affected intestinal flora – also any eating disorders,anorexia in particular that not only starved the gut of food to produce bacteria but also caused nutritional deficiency.

Late teens early twenties – perhaps taking the contraceptive pill- start of drinking more alcohol – busy lives and very often symptoms being ignored. By this time many people have developed an overgrowth of Candida Albicans and of course diet plays a role, especially if high in sugars and processed foods.

Here are the posts for Candida and sugars that you should read if you have IBS symptoms.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/04/07/smorgasbord-health-top-to-toe-the-digestive-system-candida-albicans-an-opportunistic-pathogen/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/04/10/smorgasbord-health-2017-the-digestive-system-candida-albicans-feeding-the-body-starving-the-fungus-our-daily-bread/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/04/13/smorgasbord-health-2017-digestive-system-candida-albicans-mushrooms-and-cheese/

Women will continue to experience hormonal fluctuations during pregnancy until their 60s when menopause is complete. Certainly taking HRT may effect the intestinal flora resulting in an imbalance for as long as that is taken.

Men are affected in a similar way during their lifetimes especially in relation to hormonal changes in the teen years and middle age, although IBS is more associated with women which leads weight to the hormone contributory factor.

Then from around 70 there is a decline in both activity and appetite. Less food is eaten and if dental health is not great, the variety of food is also decreased. To add to this lack of nutrient variety, you have to add in the natural decrease in digestive enzymes and acids which means that food is processed less efficiently.

Stress

Throughout a person’s lifetime suffering from this embarrassing, painful and life affecting health problem, you have to add the element of stress. The more we stress about the symptoms the more they will intensify. You become obsessed with finding bathrooms and what you eat. I have had clients come to me worn out, depressed and stressed out, trying to exist on a handful of foods that someone has told them they can eat – with a far longer list of prohibited foods – FOR LIFE. This leads to an increase in the problems and the far more dangerous risk of severe nutritional deficiency and even more severe health problems.

So – here is a brief look at the syndrome and then later in the week  I am going to give you a simple but effective way to reduce the symptoms, increase the healthy bacteria in the gut and lessen the stress associated with the problem. It will also help you identify the particular cause of your particular symptoms. This is tried and tested – so many of my clients presented with these symptoms that we had plenty of opportunity to see the process evolve into a successful management of the condition.

IBS – Where is the problem?

The bowel is the term used for both the large and the small intestine.In the case of irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, it is usually the large intestine which is involved, as this is where our stool is stored and is likely to cause the most problems. When I was working with clients, I found over a number of years that there were strong links between those who were lactose intolerant (milk sugar) from birth, Candida Albicans from childhood antibiotics and as adults following gastric upsets and taking medication, and a lifelong consumption of refined sugars. These all result in a bacterial imbalance in the gut leading to the most common symptoms experienced by those diagnosed as suffering from IBS.

What sort of symptoms are involved?

These will vary from person to person. They will also vary in severity and timing. The most common symptoms are:

  • · Abdominal pain or cramping
  • · Bloated feeling after eating.
  • · Gas.
  • · Diarrhoea and or constipation
  • · Mucus in the stool
  • · Depression.
  • · Lower back pain
  • · Chronic fatigue
  • · Panic attacks and palpitations
  • · Heartburn
  • · Light-headedness after eating

What causes these symptoms?

The walls of the intestine are lined with layers of muscle that contract and relax as they move the food from your stomach, through the intestinal tract and the rectum. Normally, this is co-ordinated and rhythmic but if you suffer from IBS, the contractions are much stronger and last longer. This causes the food to be rushed through the system. It is not processed properly – because it is not digested – and it can cause diarrhoea in the first instance. This leads to dehydration – and that affects the balance of fluids and causes further undigested food to block the intestine and – leading to constipation and stomach bloating and cramps. It is a typical vicious circle. As the nutritional deficiency develops there will of course be an affect on the whole system and the organs, hence palpitations, dizziness and could lead to heart disease, diabetes and cancers.

Later this week – a six week plan to reduce symptoms, increase healthy bacteria and function to the intestines and to identify which foods or one food is causing your IBS.

I am happy to answer questions confidentially by email if you prefer at sally.cronin@moyhill.com. If your question is general and might help someone else then please include in the comments.  I hope this has been helpful.

Smorgasbord Health – Ancient healing therapies – Reflexology


smorgasbord health

It is a couple of years since I posted a series on some of the Ancient healing therapies that are still being practiced today. I am reluctant to call them Alternative therapies as that is an expression that was coined by the medical profession back in the dark ages…up to the present day…. to describe healing that has been used for thousands of years but is beyond their comprehension.  This is not to say that all treatments today that are offered on the back of ancient healing is effective. Over the last twenty years or so I have come across some practices that I find very difficult to support.

To become an effective healer in any of the ancient practices you need to undergo stringent training and to have a broad knowledge of the human body. You also have to understand that even physical therapies that require a hands on application can have a profound effect on mental and emotional health. For example reflexology in the right hands can produce a release of emotions as well as alleviating pain and soreness in a particular region of the body.

The other aspect that it is interesting to note is that some of the ancient therapies such as acupuncture and reiki, are used on pets and they can prove to be very effective. Since animals to not experience the placebo effect, it does go a long way to prove in my mind that the treatments are genuinely beneficial to humans and animals alike.

WHAT IS REFLEXOLOGY?

Reflexology is a form of complementary medicine that was first practised over 5,000 years in China where it was used to correct energy fields in patients. There is evidence in the form of wall art that the Egyptians and Indians also used this form of healing in the same time period. The Incas are believed to have passed down their skill of reflexology to the North American Red Indians who used it extensively for healing and relaxation.

It really only came to prominence in the Western world in the last century when various physicians discovered that reflexology points when stimulated acted as a form of anaesthetic. A doctor in the U.S called Dr. William Fitzgerald developed these first points into vertical zones and connected them to specific organs and parts of the body. He wrote a book on Zone Therapy in the early 1900’s and was the forerunner of modern day reflexology therapy.

Later doctors added additional horizontal zones to the upper and underside of the feet and then to the hands. Other parts of the body such as the face and ears were explored as the connection between massaging certain points on the body and acupuncture became more apparent.

In the 1920’s a therapist called Eunice Ingham completed the chart of the feet and developed the method that today we call reflexology.

HOW DOES REFLEXOLOGY WORK?

As in acupuncture that I  will cover next week,there are a number of places on the body where pressure can be applied to benefit individual organs, systems and the structure of the body. This includes the hands and the ears but today I am going to focus on the feet which are the most common area of the body to be massaged.

In the feet there are reflex areas that correspond to all parts of the body and these areas are arranged in the form of a map on each foot. The right foot mainly corresponds to the right side of the body and the left foot to the left side with shared zones for central areas of the body. This enables therapists to be very specific about areas and conditions that require treatment. The important thing to remember with all natural therapies is that they work from the inside of the body to the outside of the body whereas conventional treatment tends to work from the outside in. In most cases this leads to the symptoms being treated and not the cause. Reflexology can treat the whole body internally and externally just by manipulating these specific pressure points.

Reflexology points

If you imagine the image of the foot from above with the toes facing away from you can get a clearer picture of the reflexology map.

There are horizontal zones running across the centre line of the toes and these pressure points relate to the face, sinus, teeth, gums and jaw on the left foot and the neck and brain stem on the right foot. Above the zone in the nail bed of the big toe is the zone for the head and brain and under the zone at the base of the toe is the zone for the neck.

Another horizontal band runs across the foot just slightly below the toes and this relates to the tops of the shoulders. Half way up the foot is a zone that can be massaged to relieve upper back problems and the zone around the base of the ankle controls the lymph glands, fallopian tubes and the groin area.

Along each side of the foot are smaller zones with specific roles in therapy. Along the outside edge of the left foot are the zones for the arm, lungs, chest and breast areas, elbow, waistline, knee and leg and lower back. Along the inside edge of the left and right feet are zones for the spine and the bladder.

On the bottom of the feet.

On the bottom of both feet you will find specific zones of varying sizes that are massaged to provide therapy for other parts and organs. On the underside of the left foot are the zones for shoulder, lungs, upper chest and back, diaphragm, gall bladder, ascending colon. Just under the last two toes is the zone for the inner ear. The big toe has a zone for the head and brain as well as one for the pituitary gland.

The underside of the right foot contains zones for the thyroid gland, eye, sinus, neck, ear, arm, stomach, spleen, transverse and descending colon and the small intestine.

Both feet share zones on the inside edge and centre which relate to the heart, solar plexus, liver, adrenal gland, pancreas, kidneys, spine, bladder, sciatic nerve and the lower back.

As in acupuncture the gentle manipulation of certain pressure points on the feet releases blocked channels in the body allowing healing to take place.

WHAT HAPPENS DURING A REFLEXOLOGY TREATMENT?

Your therapist should take a full medical history before beginning to treat you. You will then sit in a comfortable position with bare feet.

All the zones on the feet will be massaged usually using the side and end of the thumb to apply firm pressure. If there is a particular part of the body that is affected by pain or discomfort this will often be reflected in the specific zone for that area on the foot. A feeling of tenderness will be experienced that can ease with continued massage. The process should not be in any way uncomfortable and in fact many people find it very relaxing.

WHAT SORT OF MEDICAL CONDITIONS COULD REFLEXOLOGY HELP?

As with any alternative therapy, despite often having thousands of years of history, you have to be very careful about claiming that it works as a cure. Many patients find relief from stress, depression, fatigue, spinal problems, indigestion, Irritable bowel syndrome, hormone imbalance and sinusitis. It is also used for specific muscle and joint pain in conjunction with other complementary therapies.

ARE THERE ANY SIDE EFFECTS FROM UNDERGOING REFLEXOLOGY TREATMENT?

This largely depends on the extent of the original problem but there may be slight detox side effects such as mild headaches, diarrhoea, and possible congestion as the body tries to rid itself of toxins that have been released. It is a good idea to combine reflexology with a detox programme along the lines of last month’s plan combined with additional fluids. You might also experience some emotional side-effects and certainly if you have been under stress you might find yourself feeling either a little weepy.  You should certainly feel relaxed.

Reflexology and pets.

Sam enjoyed both reflexology and reiki healing which I will cover in another post. He would actively ask for a massage, not just on his tummy as many dogs do but he would come and sit with his back to me until he was touching my knees… I would then massage the edges of his ears (like in humans probably relating to certain parts of his body ) and then his neck gently and then down across the tops of his front legs and then down his spine… He would occasionally lift his paw and I would massage the pads of his foot and lightly inbetween..He would sit perfectly still for 10 minutes or so before getting up, stretching and moving off to go to sleep.

For those of you who are interested here is the link to Pet massage from last week. Good for them and good for you.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2016/07/11/pet-health-massage-for-your-pet-that-benefits-you-too-3/

Next time a look at Acupuncture which is a healing therapy that I have found to be very beneficial several times in my life.

©sallycronin Just Food for health 2007

 

 

Smorgasbord Health – Irritable Bowel Syndrome – Part Two – Strategies


Yesterday I outlined the basics of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and today a look at some of the nutrients that your intestine needs to work efficiently and also some of the triggers for the condition.

For some people the discovery that their favourite food – bread, pasta etc. is causing their discomfort, will be upsetting. We are lucky that in most cases there are alternatives and for some there is a management solution, where the food can be eaten in small amounts very infrequently.

To identify which foods are triggers for an IBS episode you need to complete a six week programme or better still extended to 12 weeks following each stage for two weeks. Nutritionally that is not a problem – two weeks without grains may be difficult but provided you are obtaining carbohydrates from other sources you should find you have plenty of energy.

The key is to listen to your body and to keep notes each day on symptoms and how you feel in general – keep a food diary, as this will provide you with the blueprints for your new diet going forward.

NUTRIENTS NEEDED TO HELP SUPPORT THE INTESTINES FUNCTION.

A broad spectrum of nutrients is required to enable the body to function and it is important that you eat a wide variety of foods to provide them. This is particularly important when your intestines are not working efficiently and only partially processing the food you eat. There are blogs on some of the nutrients in the archive but here are some that you should make sure you are consuming in food rather in supplemental form, as the body is designed to extract what it needs from natural sources rather than pills.

Cook from scratch and avoid all processed foods including sauces, ketchups, mayonnaise etc. Even the savoury kinds are full of sugar and additives that can irritate a sensitive gut. You should be eating lots of vegetables, some sugar reduced fruits and lean protein. Try not to eat very large meals that require a great deal of processing. Smaller portions with a gap of around 2 hours minimum between eating.

Some specific nutrients and food elements that are helpful for your gut.

Calcium (helps control diarrhoea) sardines, dark leafy vegetables, sardines, tinned salmon, beans, fruit such as figs and oranges, nuts and dairy if not lactose intolerant – in which case use lactose free alternative.  Calcium needs Magnesium and Vitamin D to be absorbed efficiently.

Magnesium (helps relieve constipation) Pumpkin seeds, Halibut, beans, wholegrain rice, avocados spinach.

Vitamin D acts more like a hormone and is essential for a wide range of reactions in the body. The best source of the vitamin is direct contact on the skin for at least 45 minutes a day (not to burn) but also from specific foods such as egg yolks, fatty fish like salmon and liver.

Fibre, to slow down the digestive process and allow normal absorption of nutrients and fluids from food – all vegetables and fruit.

Iron (for energy and blood health) Green leafy vegetables, fish and meat, beans, nuts, bananas.

Also anti-bacterial agents such as green tea, garlic and onions to restrict Candida growth

Peppermint tea 60 minutes after meals to reduce the cramps, spasms and pain if you are not intolerant to peppermint. You can also use peppermint oil but it is very strong and just one drop in a large glass of water is more than enough.

Some foods that can be hidden.

There is a link, as I have already mentioned, between certain foods and strong contender is gluten.The clue is in the name and comes from the Latin word for Glue!  It is a protein present in wheat and some other grains such as barley and rye.  Although not inherently present in other grains such as oats, they can become contaminated if they are processed in a mill that also works with wheat and the other grains. Gluten gives that elastic feel to bread dough and it also helps it rise.

I have not experienced a problem with wholegrain rice but it can be harsh on the intestines if you are going through an episode of IBS.. I suggest that you only have one or two tablespoons I find if I mix wholegrain with Basmati rice that is a gentler mix.

Grains are not just in cereals and bread but in many processed products including hamburgers, soups, sausages, processed meats, crisps and ready meals.

Refined Sugars are a real problem for IBS sufferers, particularly with the strong link to Candida, and it is important that you avoid refined sugar completely and also your intake of processed foods. Even savoury foods contain high levels of sugar as do breakfast cereals, jams, biscuits etc.

Here is the posts for Candida and sugars that you should read if you have IBS symptoms.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/sugars-and-candida-2015-2/

FLUIDS.

Water is important to help hydrate the body, particularly after IBS symptoms such as diarrhoea, and also to flush toxins from the body. However – you don’t need to drink litres as this will only cause a flushing effect. It will push any food you eat rapidly through the system – drinking two litres a day in delayed bursts is fine as most of the fruit and vegetables have a high fluid content too. I use a 2litre mineral water bottle – with tap water and make sure I drink throughout the day at intervals before and after meals.

Drink a glass of water when you get up and then 45 minutes before each meal. Leave at least an hour after eating before drinking anything so that the gastric juices in your stomach have a chance to digest the food you have eaten. It is better to leave two hours if you can.

JUICING.

If you are naturally pressing juices yourself than that is fine – one glass per day. Try to stick to vegetable with a small amount of fruit to taste- I actually enjoy a carrot juice with a small amount of blueberries. Store bought tend to have additives but you can find juice bars that will press a selection for you.

ALCOHOL IS SUGAR

I love a glass of wine or a shot of whisky but for this re-establishment of good bacteria in your intestinal system you need to give up for the six weeks. You can re-introduce in week six – just one glass and then limit intake and watch for any increase in symptoms.

PROBIOTICS

Our body is a rich soup of bacteria and yeasts, many that are needed for all the processing that is taking place continuously. Probiotics are the good guys and are beneficial for your digestive system especially when it is struggling to maintain a healthy balance.

You can find in foods which is obviously the best way for your body to utilise the bacteria. And whilst I would caution the use of some commericial live yogurts that can contain too much sugar and additives you can make your own at home.

I sometimes take Kefir which is a fermented dairy combination of goat’s milk and fermented kefir grains. High in lactobacilli and bifidus bacteria and antioxidants you will find in better supermarkets and also in your local health store.

Fermented foods are your other option including pickles,Sauerkraut, pickled red cabbage etc.  Also Japanese Miso soup which anyone who is familiar with macrobiotic cooking will be familiar with. It is again fermented and made from rye, beans and usually rice or barley.

Supplemental probiotics

I do take certain specific supplements when needed and one of these is a high quality probiotic. Whilst food should always be the first source of the nutrients that we need on a daily basis, there are times, such as during the recovery from an illness, when additional support is needed.

I take one probiotic capsule a day for maintenance and two when I feel I need extra help. You must keep in the fridge when opened and it needs to be of adequate strength. The one I use has 3billion active cultures and ask advice in the pharmacy or the health shop to find the most effective one for your specific needs.

If you are taking broad spectrum antibiotics, you either should wait until you have finished since they are designed to kill off all bacteria including any you might take in supplementation form, or you can get specific probiotics that are effective when taken in conjunction with antibiotics.

Tomorrow’s post The six week programme.

The aim of this programme is to reduce the symptoms that you are currently experiencing and to repopulate your intestines with the healthy bacteria needed for your body to function.

You only know if something is working if you keep a record. So to start you should write down all your symptoms and over the six weeks keep a journal – were there days when you noticed an increase or decrease in symptoms– what did you eat in the last 24 hours. Did you re-introduce a grain or dairy etc?

This will also help you in the future when you perhaps relapse and you can look back and perhaps identify a food or habit that might have crept back in.

I will also give you foods you can eat and when to reintroduce suspected triggers for symptoms.

Here is yesterday’s part one on IBS

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2015/04/28/smorgasbord-health-irritable-bowel-syndrome-stop-and-rewind/

Smorgasbord Health – Irritable Bowel Syndrome – Stop and Rewind.


Thank you for the emails with questions about various aspects of nutritional health. There have been a number with questions about Irritable Bowel Syndrome and as I have not done a post on the subject for over a year over the next two days I am going to cover the condition and some strategies to manage it.

I am not surprised that so many people are interested in finding out more about IBS since it is a health issue that affects millions of men, women and children worldwide. There is a massive amount of information out there on the condition and it can become confusing as to the why, how and what to do about it when it effects us personally.

Stop and Rewind.
I am afraid if there is a disease with a syndrome in the title it means that the professionals really do not know the why, how and what to do either! In diseases like this symptoms are lumped together and given them a collective name. As in Irritable Bowel Syndrome……..

In working with men, women and children who have these symptoms for the last 18 years I too cannot give you a definitive cause. However, I have found it useful to stop and rewind.

Infant years
It helps if you have a parent alive who can tell you if you were a colic prone baby, cried a great deal, demanded a bottle frequently but failed to put weight on and thrive and had several stomach upsets. This is probably due to lactose intolerance – milk sugar basically which is in human milk and then of course dairy which babies tend to be weaned onto.

Anti-biotics
If that was not the case then I would look at anti-biotic prescription from as early as the client could determine. If not then would track back to when the early stage symptoms of intestinal issues first presented. I could track mine to age 11 when I had six courses of anti-biotics before finally having my tonsils removed. I put on three stone in three months and developed an unhealthy addiction to sugar.

Hormonal imbalance, dieting, lifestyle
Then teenage years – hormonal fluctuations or prescription drugs such as those for acne that might have affected intestinal flora – also any eating disorders,anorexia in particular that not only starved the gut of food to produce bacteria but also caused nutritional deficiency.

Late teens early twenties – perhaps taking the contraceptive pill- start of drinking more alcohol – busy lives and very often symptoms being ignored. By this time many people have developed an overgrowth of Candida Albicans and of course diet plays a role, especially if high in sugars and processed foods.

Here is the posts for Candida and sugars that you should read if you have IBS symptoms.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/sugars-and-candida-2015-2/

Women will continue to experience hormonal fluctuations during pregnancy until their 60s when menopause is complete. Certainly taking HRT may effect the intestinal flora resulting in an imbalance for as long as that is taken.

Men are affected in a similar way during their lifetimes especially in relation to hormonal changes in the teen years and middle age, although IBS is more associated with women which leads weight to the hormone contributory factor.

Then from around 70 there is a decline in both activity and appetite. Less food is eaten and if dental health is not great, the variety of food is also decreased. To add to this lack of nutrient variety, you have to add in the natural decrease in digestive enzymes and acids which means that food is processed less efficiently.

Stress
Throughout a person’s lifetime suffering from this embarrassing, painful and life affecting health problem, you have to add the element of stress. The more we stress about the symptoms the more they will intensify. You become obsessed with finding bathrooms and what you eat. I have had clients come to me worn out, depressed and stressed out, trying to exist on a handful of foods that someone has told them they can eat – with a far longer list of prohibited foods – FOR LIFE. This leads to an increase in the problems and the far more dangerous risk of severe nutritional deficiency and even more severe health problems.

So – here is a brief look at the syndrome and then tomorrow I am going to give you a simple but effective way to reduce the symptoms, increase the healthy bacteria in the gut and lessen the stress associated with the problem. It will also help you identify the particular cause of your particular symptoms. This is tried and tested – so many of my clients presented with these symptoms that we had plenty of opportunity to see the process evolve into a successful management of the condition.

IBS – Where is the problem?
The bowel is the term used for both the large and the small intestine.In the case of irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, it is usually the large intestine which is involved, as this is where our stool is stored and is likely to cause the most problems. When I was working with clients, I found over a number of years that there were strong links between those who were lactose intolerant (milk sugar) from birth, Candida Albicans from childhood antibiotics and as adults following gastric upsets and taking medication, and a lifelong consumption of refined sugars. These all result in a bacterial imbalance in the gut leading to the most common symptoms experienced by those diagnosed as suffering from IBS.

What sort of symptoms are involved?
These will vary from person to person. They will also vary in severity and timing. The most common symptoms are:

  • · Abdominal pain or cramping
  • · Bloated feeling after eating.
  • · Gas.
  • · Diarrhoea and or constipation
  • · Mucus in the stool
  • · Depression.
  • · Lower back pain
  • · Chronic fatigue
  • · Panic attacks and palpitations
  • · Heartburn
  • · Light-headedness after eating

What causes these symptoms?
The walls of the intestine are lined with layers of muscle that contract and relax as they move the food from your stomach, through the intestinal tract and the rectum. Normally, this is co-ordinated and rhythmic but if you suffer from IBS, the contractions are much stronger and last longer. This causes the food to be rushed through the system. It is not processed properly – because it is not digested – and it can cause diarrhoea in the first instance. This leads to dehydration – and that affects the balance of fluids and causes further undigested food to block the intestine and – leading to constipation and stomach bloating and cramps. It is a typical vicious circle. As the nutritional deficiency develops there will of course be an affect on the whole system and the organs, hence palpitations, dizziness and could lead to heart disease, diabetes and cancers.

Later this week – a six week plan to reduce symptoms, increase healthy bacteria and function to the intestines and to identify which foods or one food is causing your IBS.

I am happy to answer questions confidentially by email if you prefer at sally.cronin@moyhill.com. If your question is general and might help someone else then please include in the comments.  I hope this has been helpful.