Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – Christmas Book Fair – Guest Post – Kevin Cooper – Tripartite On Reviews


Delighted to welcome author and book reviewer Kevin Cooper as a guest to talk about book reviews and I am sure you will find it very helpful as I did.

Part One – The Five-Star Review

The five-star review is probably one of the easiest reviews to write no matter what genre(s) you’re into. You love the work, there are no issues surrounding grammar and sentence structure, the plot is excellent, and the story entices you to keep reading. You probably love the work in as much you want a sequel or wait eagerly in anticipation for the author’s next work to come out. You will, without doubt want to read it again sometime…

It has the Wow Factor. Everything you say in your review screams out, “Guys, you gotta read this book!” This is usually followed by great praise for the author and whether you write long detailed reviews or short summary reviews, your audience will know that this book ticks all the boxes for you. If all the above is true, you have written a five-star review for all the right reasons. If all of the above is not true, please, do not fall into the traps listed below:

Wrong reasons for writing a five-star review

  • You know/like the author.
  • You don’t want to offend the author.
  • The author gave you a five-five star review and you feel obligated to return the favour.
  • You don’t like being negative.
  • You’re afraid that if you criticise, the author may retaliate.
  • You only write five-star reviews.

The traps can be endless, but either way, you look at it, it’s dishonest to other readers, and you are deceiving yourself if you think you are doing the author, yourself or other readers any favours.

What if a reader buys a book based on your review and it does not live up to the expectations that you have influenced? Not only could they take it out on the said author by leaving a very negative review, but they may never trust one of your reviews again. In other words, you lose all the credibility of being a good reviewer. So in the long term, you may cause more harm than good by writing a five-star review simply because you felt obligated to or some similar reason.

However, I don’t want you to be deterred from writing five-star reviews and not everyone is going to agree with you on the star rating you give. As long as you have been honest. You have nothing to worry about. Whether you know the author, have received a five-star review from that author, don’t want to offend, be negative and so on, remember, There is nothing wrong with writing a four-star, three-star, or if necessary even two or one-star reviews. Simply be honest, be constructive, and if it helps, let folks know why you chose to give any particular star rating.

Part Two – The Four-Star Review

I love four-star reviews. For me receiving a four-star review is every bit as rewarding as receiving a five-star review… and some. Why the ‘and some’? Because in some cases, four-star reviews can be more rewarding. I have actually written more four-star reviews than other ratings, especially as my own approach to reviews has changed over the years. Yes, I fell into the above traps at first… Guilty As Charged! Most of those reviews have since been removed by myself. I left only the ones that were sincere.

A four-star review gives more of a sense of sincerity. It tells the reader you loved their work, you highly recommend it to others. It is an excellent work and once again, ticks all the boxes or just about all of them. (Realistically, one cannot expect every book to tick all the boxes.)

Your readers can hear you shouting about this work and may even include some high praise for author. It’s most certainly a memorable work for all the right reasons and there’s no reason why it shouldn’t have a four-star review.

How I approach writing a four-star review…

Firstly, for all types of reviews, I always leave a margin for errors for the sake of human error, even for my five-star reviews. However, the wider that margin grows, the lower my star rating goes. The four-star review margin is quite narrow… meaning there’s not much more in it from the five-star. How I judge it is by how the work affects me…

I loved the work. I may even be tempted read it again. I most certainly would have no problem with highly recommending it, but somewhere it just didn’t quite match up to others which I have given five stars for. It’s not quite there for some reason. This doubt could be caused by anything from a slow start getting into the work to one or two more errors than what you feel comfortable with or simply the feeling that it could have been a bit better overall. In some of my four-star reviews, I tend to say something to the effect of, ‘…had it not been for…. This would have been a five-star review for me.’ It’s as simple as that.

Part Three – The Three-Star Review and lower star ratings

Three-star reviews are probably the trickiest of all reviews. Few people like to write them, and even fewer like to receive them. Personally, I don’t mind receiving a three-star review as long as it’s honest and has something to say which I can learn from, albeit, like all authors, I do prefer five-star and four-star reviews. However, I have to admit. I still don’t like writing three-star reviews.

First and foremost as with all reviews, when writing the three-star review, one should be perfectly honest without being offensive. One way we can achieve this is by looking at reviews in the same manner as one’s perspective of the school/university rating systems. E.g.: A five-star review would be equivalent to an A… for excellent work; Four-star reviews are equivalent to receiving a B… for very good work. This brings us to the three-star review… (You’ve guessed it!) C.

So what’s wrong with a C or a three-star review? It actually means that the work is equally as good as most everybody else’s!

It’s a funny old world we live in. We love democracy because it provides everyone with a voice. We fight for equality and a fairer society. But, nobody likes being average.

The key to writing a good three-star review is the same as that of receiving one: Firstly, remember that three-stars, still means the work is deemed to be as good as most anyone else’s you have read or anyone’s else’s out there. Let the person know why it’s three-stars and what you would do or suggest to improve it. This could be any reason from a slow start, getting lost a bit due to holes in the story to structural or grammatical errors.

The same principle can be used for lower star reviews if you do decide to write them. I have written some lower star reviews in the past, but now I don’t really bother with writing these reviews. They take up too much time and energy. I simply put these works down and start reading something else instead of wasting my time with them. If I can’t finish a book, I don’t review it and these days I find it difficult enough to finish a three-star work without getting into the hassle of having to explain a lower-star review.

Thanks for reading, folks!

©Kevin Cooper 2019

About Kevin Cooper

Kevin Cooper is an eclectic author & songwriter. His works are multifarious. He has published fantasy, sci-fi, memoirs and drama in the form of novels, novellas, short stories, poetry and song.

Some of KC’s major influences in literature are JRR Tolkien, Philip Pullman, C.S Lewis, Terry Brooks, and J.K Rowling.

KC was born in Hull, England. At 21 years of age, he moved to the USA where he first attended Western Kentucky University, but transferred to Asbury College where he graduated with a BA in Psychology. He then attended Asbury Theological Seminary for a couple of years before moving to Arizona where he enrolled at the Grand Canyon University, obtained a research fellowship and graduated with a M.Ed. His career in education spanned from tutor to teacher, to college lecturer. He later changed careers and went into management working for The Hertz Corporation. After almost twenty years living and working in the USA, he returned to England where his worked in the NHS for several years before giving up work to care for his wife, and focus on his writing and music.

You can read Kevin’s insightful reviews for other authors: Author Kevin Cooper Book Reviews

Time to look at some of Kevin’s own books

About  Miedo “Afraid”

Miedo ‘Afraid’ contains both of the volumes of the Miedo story: Miedo: Living Beyond Childhood Fear & Miedo 2: A Reckoning With Fear.

Miedo: Living Beyond Childhood Fear is a memoir written as a British drama set in the historical city of hull in the mid-1960s-1980s. This is the true story of a boy who after losing his mother at a very young age, begins to experience a plethora of paranormal/supernatural incidents brought about through the circumstances of living within a dysfunctional family and resulting in a childhood filled with fear.

Miedo’s story continues in this chilling sequel to Meido: Living Beyond Childhood Fear. As Miedo comes into young adulthood, he is confronted with new demons while he searches for answers to his past through Spiritualism. But, rather than finding answers, he is left with more questions as a plethora of paranormal experiences occur in his life once again…

A review for the book

“All good things must come to an end”

The book tells a true story of a painful past that emerges from the depths of time, which continues to prick the memory of the man who recounts his childhood.

A novel that touches the heartstrings, rattling arcane emotions, in pure and naked sincerity dictated by the need to rework trauma and patterns that have influenced dramatically a life.
The author rewinds the time as if it were a ball of wool defeat from an old sweater. There are knots, ends tied after the thread is broken… wounded in the most intimate. Other times, the thread appears thin, slim and fragile, almost a metaphor of the moments where the mere fact of “being alive” appears as a condition of punishment.

The author takes us by the hand, accompanying us to meet the places of his childhood tormented by dark and devastating presences.

In the garden of the grandparents, the particularity of a sour apple fall from the tree prematurely, and sugar bowl given to him by his grandmother for dipping the fruit and make it sweeter. On the other hand, the memories of the taste of a chocolate mint “After Eight”, carefully removed from the tin bottle-green colour.

The feeling of an insect that walks on his arm, the sadness of knowing that if a bumblebee stings you then he dies… Many small detailed descriptions that enrich the reader with sensations simple and so purest to make you reconnect with your own childhood.

Yet, the fish & chips, meatballs, and sausage sprinkled with vinegar, taken from the store where worked his grandmother.

The deep affection of the child towards his grandparents, to mitigate his great fear of the present and of the apparitions that at night arise in front of his bed. Then there are the plots and family intrigues, pettiness of both sisters Liz and Chloe… other characters that come and go from the story, distant sounds of panaceas to the suffering that was always lurking.

Then a new change, the author is separated by his grandparents and is living in a new environment, a cold and lifeless house, everything he loved had been taken away… without notice… without asking him what he wanted. “All good things must come to an end.”
Then the presence of true friends, and those supposed, met at school or at work, or the meeting with deep Faith, will lead the author to new and radical changes.

“Suffering is mostly caused by fear, not by the circumstances themselves, but by my response to them” (Jan Frasier)

But I will not reveal more of the 440 pages that certainly will be anchoring you, making you a participant in the most intimate, making you even cry tears of bitterness.

A very good novel, honest and unfussy, which will certainly make the reader ponder!
Claudine Giovannoni.

A selection of other books by Kevin Cooper

Read the reviews and buy the books: Amazon UK

And: Amazon US

More reviews and follow Kevin: Goodreads

You can connect to Kevin 

Blog
Kevin’s Music
Twitter
Facebook Author Page

My thanks to Kevin for his interesting and useful perspective on writing book reviews and I know he would be delighted to respond to your questions.

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Kentucky Days Part Two – Lost River Cave by Kevin Cooper


My thanks to Kevin Cooper for sharing his time living in Kentucky and in part two we explore a cave with an interesting history.

Lost River Cave by Kevin Cooper

One of the many trips I had while in the US was to Lost River Cave. Lost River Cave is located on Nashville Road, Bowling Green, Kentucky. Now when I visited it in the mid to late 80’s. It was a ruins. See the pictures. I climbed down somewhat, but couldn’t do much at the time as I had my suit on. (It wasn’t a planned trip)

It is actually a seven mile cave system. It has always been a rich fresh water and food source throughout its history. Even in the American civil war it was used as a camping site (and escape point) for both confederate and union soldiers. Some time later, in 1943 onwards it was used for river dances. However, by the 1980’s it had become a neglected ruin and more of a dumping site than a historical site. This was around the time I came to live in Bowling Green.

I’m happy to say that thanks to Western Kentucky University and The Friends of lost river it has been restored and now offers a two-part tour. The first part is a walking tour through the caves and the rest is on the boats in the river. It is also used as an educational tour for schools. I hope to return someday so I can enjoy the benefits of this wonderfully restored place.

You can find out more about this historic location here: https://lostrivercave.wordpress.com/

As you can see from this photograph the cave is very different today from the 1980s and you can explore in comfort.

 

” Plan to spend about 45 minutes to an hour on this two-part tour.

The Cave Boat Tour begins with a leisurely stroll in the valley as your guide shares the tale of the blue hole and disappearing Civil War soldiers.

When you arrive at the massive cave entrance, prepare to board Kentucky’s only underground boat tour. Duck your head for just a moment as you glide under the famous wishing rock. Touch the cool limestone ceiling before the passage opens into a cathedral-like cavern. Sturdy shoes recommended. No dogs allowed on tours.

We encourage you to purchase your tickets online in advance, but it is not required, walk ins are welcome”

Image and more information: http://lostrivercave.org/cave-tours/

©Kevin Cooper 2015

My thanks to Kevin for sharing this post on his life in Kentucky and I hope you will head over to his blogs and follow his more current postings.

About Kevin Cooper

Kevin Cooper was born in Hull, East Yorkshire, England in 1963

He moved to the USA in 1985 when he was 21 years old. He graduated with a BA in Psychology from Asbury College in Kentucky with recognition on the Dean’s List. He continued his studies at the Grand Canyon University in Arizona, where he obtained a Research Fellowship and graduated with a M.Ed with a strong focus on writing and grammar.

While in America, Kevin has been a College Lecturer of General Studies, a Manager for The Hertz Corporation, who acknowledged him with awards of recognition for his service and dedication to the company, a Substitute Teacher, and a Private Tutor.
He now resides in England and is an established Author of several works.

Kevin founded Kev’s Author Interviews and Author of the Month to help promote fellow authors worldwide through his website and across the social media networks.
He recently re-branded his website to Kev’s Great Indie Authors with added features for authors including an editing service and book reviews. He is always developing his services as he comes across new ways to help promote indie authors.

A selection of books by Kevin Cooper

41c9jzpkqyl-_uy250_51tood7xwl-_uy250_51uhaelypwl-_uy250_51oheje9rl-_uy250_51zpaloj4fl-_uy250_

About Miedo 2: A Reckoning With Fear.

Miedo’s story continues in this chilling sequel to Meido: Living Beyond Childhood Fear. As Miedo comes into young adulthood, he is confronted with new demons while he searches for answers to his past through Spiritualism. But, rather than finding answers, he is left with more questions as a plethora of paranormal experiences occur in his life once again…

One of the recent reviews for the book

I enjoyed Cooper’s first memoir, Miedo: Living Beyond Childhood Fear, and when I finally picked up this sequel, I liked it even more than the first. It continues the story of Cooper’s early life through his teens, including his struggle to find his place in the world, understand the role of faith in his life, and control the demons that continue to plague him.

Told in the 3rd person, the memoir reads like a story, and Miedo is a highly sympathetic character. I related to his feelings of displacement, and the rambling style of Cooper’s narration perfectly reflects that time of life when young adults are stumbling about and trying to define who they are. In some ways, the narrative reminds me of Frank McCourt (Angela’s Ashes) as it picks up on the day to day seemingly insignificant events that make up a life. People and jobs, plans and friends come and go like water through Miedo’s fingers. His sense of belonging never seems to have a strong anchor though there are some relationships that he relies on.

Cooper does an excellent job of telling his story in Miedo’s authentic “voice,” reflecting his age and education at the time events unfold. The narrative also happens in the moment. In other words, this is not a memoir that the authors relates with the benefit of hindsight, but one that unfolds for the reader as it happens.

Miedo 2: A Reckoning with Fear isn’t a long read. Cooper’s style is unique and his story is addicting. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys memoirs and stories about the struggle to overcome difficult childhoods. I’m looking forward to the next book in the series.

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Miedo-2-Reckoning-Kevin-Cooper-ebook/dp/B00SC35UG

And Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Miedo-2-Reckoning-Kevin-Cooper-ebook/dp/B00SC35UG

Read more reviews and follow Kevin on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/460158.Kevin_Cooper

Connect with Kevin

Author page Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kevin-Cooper/e/B00EWFEYKQ
Author page Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Kevin-Cooper/e/B00EWFEYKQ
Website: https://lovelifetearsnlaughter.wordpress.com/about/
Blog:https://kcbooksandmusic.wordpress.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kevcooper63
Twitter: https://twitter.com/GrtIndieAuthors
Google: https://plus.google.com/+KevinCooper/posts

Thank you for popping in today and I am sure that Kevin would love your feedback.. thanks Sally

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Kentucky Days by Kevin Cooper


Another post from the archives of Kevin Cooper and here is part one of his time of living in Kentucky.

Kentucky Days by Kevin Cooper

Morning View

My first, ever car was a 1974 Cadillac sedan deville. It was my second year over in the states and I had just passed my driving test. Considering that I almost got run down by a car my first week over there makes this look like a miracle. I had looked the wrong way before crossing the road. The language coming from the driver who swerved to avoid me, I’ll never forget. Then he was gone and I was left standing there, dumbfounded.

I remember, Doug, my pastor from the Free-Methodist Church we attended laughing his arse off. I rang him almost immediately after getting it; I couldn’t wait to go and show it off to him. “Couldn’t you have found a bigger car, Kev?” He almost doubled over as I pulled up outside the church. He put his arm around me when I got out, still laughing.

It was something of a novelty seeing an Englishman driving an old cadillac that was bigger than his house. Doug wasn’t the only one who laughed and patted me on the back. “You crease me up!” They would say, and they meant it.

Our first big outing was a trip to Cincinnati, Ohio. It was just a road trip for me to get used to the car. About 180 miles distance. Morning view, KY is just outside of Ohio. It’s a beautiful drive, hence the pics. I flew into Cincinnati Airport when I immigrated the previous year and wanted to get a feel of how far away it was, without the jet lag.

The Car drove like a dream. It had automatic trans, cruise control, air conditioning and it was total luxury inside. I loved that car.

I only have pics of my car and Rich Road. The first pic is Doug and I. The pic with the teeny tiny house in the back that looks about half as big as the car, that was the first house we rented.

Barren River

Barren River is one of the first places I visited when I immigrated to the US. I lived in Bowling Green, Kentucky in Warren County and Barren River which is 135 miles long, flows into Bowling Green from Monroe County, (Named after the US’s fifth president, James Monroe.) also in Kentucky.

I was a little dubious when I first visited Barren River due to strange wildlife there. Rattlesnakes and spiders in particular, BIG spiders. My eyes were all over the place as I walked through the green. I had already seen wasps that were so much bigger than I was used to. (Ours are like gnats in comparison.) They scared the hell out of me. Insect life was something I had to adjust to.

My uneasiness didn’t last long. Once I saw the beauty of the river, all was forgotten. Even on my way back, I was still thinking of the river with its beautiful surroundings and totally oblivious to the wildlife around me. 🙂

The first two pictures are where I lived when I first immigrated. It is a twin apartment complex called, The Towers. The third pic is of an US Mail Jeep…I had never seen the like before and just had to have a photo of it. 🙂

About four to five years later, Mike, my brother-in-law and I took Wesley, my son (he would have bordered on two years at the time) to the river so he could appreciate the beauty of its surroundings.

They were happy days folks and I wouldn’t exchange them for the world.

©Kevin Cooper 2015

My thanks to Kevin for sharing this post on his life in Kentucky with part two next week.

About Kevin Cooper

Kevin Cooper was born in Hull, East Yorkshire, England in 1963

He moved to the USA in 1985 when he was 21 years old. He graduated with a BA in Psychology from Asbury College in Kentucky with recognition on the Dean’s List. He continued his studies at the Grand Canyon University in Arizona, where he obtained a Research Fellowship and graduated with a M.Ed with a strong focus on writing and grammar.

While in America, Kevin has been a College Lecturer of General Studies, a Manager for The Hertz Corporation, who acknowledged him with awards of recognition for his service and dedication to the company, a Substitute Teacher, and a Private Tutor.
He now resides in England and is an established Author of several works.

Kevin founded Kev’s Author Interviews and Author of the Month to help promote fellow authors worldwide through his website and across the social media networks.
He recently re-branded his website to Kev’s Great Indie Authors with added features for authors including an editing service and book reviews. He is always developing his services as he comes across new ways to help promote indie authors.

A selection of books by Kevin Cooper

41c9jzpkqyl-_uy250_51tood7xwl-_uy250_51uhaelypwl-_uy250_51oheje9rl-_uy250_51zpaloj4fl-_uy250_

About Miedo 2: A Reckoning With Fear.

Miedo’s story continues in this chilling sequel to Meido: Living Beyond Childhood Fear. As Miedo comes into young adulthood, he is confronted with new demons while he searches for answers to his past through Spiritualism. But, rather than finding answers, he is left with more questions as a plethora of paranormal experiences occur in his life once again…

One of the recent reviews for the book

I enjoyed Cooper’s first memoir, Miedo: Living Beyond Childhood Fear, and when I finally picked up this sequel, I liked it even more than the first. It continues the story of Cooper’s early life through his teens, including his struggle to find his place in the world, understand the role of faith in his life, and control the demons that continue to plague him.

Told in the 3rd person, the memoir reads like a story, and Miedo is a highly sympathetic character. I related to his feelings of displacement, and the rambling style of Cooper’s narration perfectly reflects that time of life when young adults are stumbling about and trying to define who they are. In some ways, the narrative reminds me of Frank McCourt (Angela’s Ashes) as it picks up on the day to day seemingly insignificant events that make up a life. People and jobs, plans and friends come and go like water through Miedo’s fingers. His sense of belonging never seems to have a strong anchor though there are some relationships that he relies on.

Cooper does an excellent job of telling his story in Miedo’s authentic “voice,” reflecting his age and education at the time events unfold. The narrative also happens in the moment. In other words, this is not a memoir that the authors relates with the benefit of hindsight, but one that unfolds for the reader as it happens.

Miedo 2: A Reckoning with Fear isn’t a long read. Cooper’s style is unique and his story is addicting. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys memoirs and stories about the struggle to overcome difficult childhoods. I’m looking forward to the next book in the series.

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Miedo-2-Reckoning-Kevin-Cooper-ebook/dp/B00SC35UG

And Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Miedo-2-Reckoning-Kevin-Cooper-ebook/dp/B00SC35UG

Read more reviews and follow Kevin on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/460158.Kevin_Cooper

Connect with Kevin

Author page Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kevin-Cooper/e/B00EWFEYKQ
Author page Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Kevin-Cooper/e/B00EWFEYKQ
Website: https://lovelifetearsnlaughter.wordpress.com/about/
Blog:https://kcbooksandmusic.wordpress.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kevcooper63
Twitter: https://twitter.com/GrtIndieAuthors
Google: https://plus.google.com/+KevinCooper/posts

Thank you for popping in today and I am sure that Kevin would love your feedback.. thanks Sally

 

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives -Bronte Country by Kevin Cooper


Delighted to welcome Kevin Cooper to the series with three posts. In his first post Kevin and his wife Pat took a break from her treatment from breast cancer to explore Bronte country.

Bronte Country by Kevin Cooper

With everything going on, we haven’t planned to do anything over Easter. Having said that, our thoughts are turning towards the need for a vacation or at the very least, a weekend holiday. We don’t feel we can really plan anything until after Pat finishes her radiotherapy early in May.

We normally do have days away or weekends away around Easter, but since we have nothing really going on this year here’s what we did… yesteryears, so to speak. 🙂

A few years ago, Pat and I celebrated Easter in Haworth. It was a weekend trip. I had neglected to take my camera charger and only managed to get pictures of us on the Barge Trip, but we really enjoyed it nevertheless.

Haworth is well known as Bronte Country. It’s where the Bronte Sisters were born and raised. Charlotte wrote the most works, Jane Eyre being the most popular. Personally, I like Anne’s, Agnes Grey the best. I believe the most popular of all though is Emily’s, Wuthering Heights with its most famous quotation, “I am Heathcliff!” which I sometimes find myself crying out when I’m in La-la land, depending of which version of La-la land I’m in… I digress. Their brother, Branwell was more of an artist and a poet.

I was fortunate to obtain the complete Bronte paperback collection for Pat while we were in Howarth, and a compilation of their poems for myself, which I didn’t know existed. Pat often takes one of their works on holiday with her. I pick one up once in a while myself for a good re-read when everything else on the market just looks downright boring and trite. 😀

We took a canal trip at Hebden Bridge. Being as it was Easter, they had this huge white egg on the front of the barge. I actually found the egg somewhat annoying because I had a hard time getting the camera around it to take shots. (Grr!)

The dog that’s on the barge in the photos below, followed us all the way down the canal and back. He’d wait at the gates with us, smiling with his mouth open and then carry on when we were moving again. Pat noticed him first and I observed him while we had our cuppa. I wish I had got more shots of him now.

The most interesting part for me was waiting for the lock gates to fill with water. Not having been on a barge before, I found it to be quite a novelty. The view was beautiful. Pat got bored with all the waiting at each gate.

We’ve been back to Bronte Country since this trip, particularly the village and the Bronte Museum. It was unplanned and I didn’t have my camera at all that time. However, I was impressed by how much I learned at the museum, how life was back in the day, the black death, changes that Patrick Bronte (Their father) sought to make to improve the lives of people in the village…I could go on, but I’m saving that for another post when I have some more photos to share.

Pat especially loved the museum. I’ll be sure to get some really good pics the next time we go, especially of the village and the museum. Pat and I actually enjoy short breaks more than we do long vacations and it seems we enjoy holidays here in Britain more than those abroad. 🙂

©Kevin Cooper 2016

About Kevin Cooper

Kevin Cooper was born in Hull, East Yorkshire, England in 1963

He moved to the USA in 1985 when he was 21 years old. He graduated with a BA in Psychology from Asbury College in Kentucky with recognition on the Dean’s List. He continued his studies at the Grand Canyon University in Arizona, where he obtained a Research Fellowship and graduated with a M.Ed with a strong focus on writing and grammar.

While in America, Kevin has been a College Lecturer of General Studies, a Manager for The Hertz Corporation, who acknowledged him with awards of recognition for his service and dedication to the company, a Substitute Teacher, and a Private Tutor.
He now resides in England and is an established Author of several works.

Kevin founded Kev’s Author Interviews and Author of the Month to help promote fellow authors worldwide through his website and across the social media networks.
He recently re-branded his website to Kev’s Great Indie Authors with added features for authors including an editing service and book reviews. He is always developing his services as he comes across new ways to help promote indie authors.

A selection of books by Kevin Cooper

41c9jzpkqyl-_uy250_51tood7xwl-_uy250_51uhaelypwl-_uy250_51oheje9rl-_uy250_51zpaloj4fl-_uy250_

About Miedo 2: A Reckoning With Fear.

Miedo’s story continues in this chilling sequel to Meido: Living Beyond Childhood Fear. As Miedo comes into young adulthood, he is confronted with new demons while he searches for answers to his past through Spiritualism. But, rather than finding answers, he is left with more questions as a plethora of paranormal experiences occur in his life once again…

One of the recent reviews for the book

I enjoyed Cooper’s first memoir, Miedo: Living Beyond Childhood Fear, and when I finally picked up this sequel, I liked it even more than the first. It continues the story of Cooper’s early life through his teens, including his struggle to find his place in the world, understand the role of faith in his life, and control the demons that continue to plague him.

Told in the 3rd person, the memoir reads like a story, and Miedo is a highly sympathetic character. I related to his feelings of displacement, and the rambling style of Cooper’s narration perfectly reflects that time of life when young adults are stumbling about and trying to define who they are. In some ways, the narrative reminds me of Frank McCourt (Angela’s Ashes) as it picks up on the day to day seemingly insignificant events that make up a life. People and jobs, plans and friends come and go like water through Miedo’s fingers. His sense of belonging never seems to have a strong anchor though there are some relationships that he relies on.

Cooper does an excellent job of telling his story in Miedo’s authentic “voice,” reflecting his age and education at the time events unfold. The narrative also happens in the moment. In other words, this is not a memoir that the authors relates with the benefit of hindsight, but one that unfolds for the reader as it happens.

Miedo 2: A Reckoning with Fear isn’t a long read. Cooper’s style is unique and his story is addicting. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys memoirs and stories about the struggle to overcome difficult childhoods. I’m looking forward to the next book in the series.

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Miedo-2-Reckoning-Kevin-Cooper-ebook/dp/B00SC35UG

And Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Miedo-2-Reckoning-Kevin-Cooper-ebook/dp/B00SC35UG

Read more reviews and follow Kevin on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/460158.Kevin_Cooper

Connect with Kevin

Author page Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kevin-Cooper/e/B00EWFEYKQ
Author page Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Kevin-Cooper/e/B00EWFEYKQ
Website: https://lovelifetearsnlaughter.wordpress.com/about/
Blog:https://kcbooksandmusic.wordpress.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kevcooper63
Twitter: https://twitter.com/GrtIndieAuthors
Google: https://plus.google.com/+KevinCooper/posts

My thanks to Kevin for sharing this lovely day trip to Bronte Country and there will be more posts in the next few weeks.