Smorgasbord Blogger Daily – Thursday 9th September 2021 – D.G. Kaye, Elizabeth Gauffreau, Jim Borden, Pete Springer, Carol Taylor


A small selection of posts I have enjoyed over the last few days and I hope you will head over to read in full.. thanks Sally.

The first post is from earlier in the week from D.G. Kaye (Debby Gies) who shares the meaning of Jewish New Year – Rosh Hashanah and what it means to her personally.

Rosh Hashana

Jewish New Year – Rosh Hashana, What About it?

Jewish New Year came early this year. Every year it falls on a different date because the holidays are based on the 10 month Jewish Calendar. It begins on the Jewish Calendar in the 7th month, Tishrei, which typically falls in September or October on the Gregorian calendar. It is believed to have begun as far back as 6th century BC. Ever wonder what to say on Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, when you meet a Jewish person? The Jewish New Year is not just about vowing new goals to lose weight or work out at the gym. 

Head over to read Debby’s informative and personal observations about this important festival: D.G. Kaye – Jewish New Year – Rosh Hashana – What about it?

The next post is from Liz Gauffreau who demonstrates the effectiveness in writing a story in two genres.. in this instance a Tanka and a non-fiction story. N.B Liz has a new poetry book out later this month that is receiving great advance reviews – Grief Songs on pre-order – Amazon USAmazon UK

Youth Group Picnic: A Tale of Two Genres

My dad is the fellow in the middle. According to his Aunt Louise, the crew cut he is sporting made him look “defective.”

Genre Revisited

I have always been fascinated by one of the most basic aspects of the writing process: deciding which genre will best align with the experience I feel inspired to write about. Am I trying to convey a particular emotion? Am I trying to work out the mystery of why people behave the way they do? Am I trying to impose some order on a series of seemingly random events? Do I just want to have some fun and play?

Head over to enjoy both Tanka and story and share your thoughts: Youth Group picnic – a tale of two genres

Something from Jim Borden on the problems that are arising during school board meetings that are turning fractious and sometimes even ugly.

School board members are typically unpaid volunteers, often parents who step forward to shape school policy, choose a superintendent, and review the budget. In most places, and during most times, it was a relatively unremarkable, yet vital position, one that few people paid attention to, or even knew who the members of the local school board were.

But times have changed, reflecting the divisiveness that exists when our country at this moment in time. Look at some of these examples: 

Head over to read the rest of Jim’s post and share your thoughts: Why Would Anyone Want to Be on Their Local School Board?

Next Peter Springer with a thought provoking and reasoned article on the point where we realise we need to act not just on our own behalf but on behalf of others around us. Particularly in relation to the vaccination programme against Covid. I do recommend you head over to read in full.

Photo Credit from CDC

Stop the Madness

When it comes to most matters, I’m one of those people who can typically see both sides of an issue. For example, I don’t own a weapon, but I understand and respect the right of others who own a gun to protect themselves or use a rifle for hunting. I believe an organized society needs fair laws that protect its citizens, and we need the police to uphold those laws. I am a big supporter of law enforcement. I generally think they do an excellent job doing a difficult task, especially given their decisions must happen in a split second. The actions of a few bad ones shouldn’t cloud our judgment of the profession as a whole. At the same time, we can’t bury our heads in the sand as some officers use their positions of authority in abusive ways.  

Head over to read the rest of Pete’s post on this contentious subject: Stop the Madness – Pete Springer

And to finish off today a recipe… as always from Carol Taylor, it is cook from scratch and is delicious. Coconut biscuits/cookies. Carol has also been getting out and about to up her fitness levels.. a reminder to us all (me included) that it makes a difference.

CarolCooks2…In my kitchen…Coconut Biscuits/Cookies…

Coconut Biscuits

I don’t make biscuits very often…I love a homemade cookie/biscuit far more than my waistline does…over the last 18 months I have not walked as much and the pounds have crept on…as I am very close to my 70th birthday…yikes…the motivation to get those pounds off has increased.

I have started walking again however because my feet have gotten soft I gained a glorious blister the other day although I did push it and walked further than I should have… however as it was my first week back on the exercise circuit I know it was stupid of me..

Head over to save the recipe and catch up on Carol’s fitness programme: CarolCooks2…In my kitchen…Coconut Biscuits/Cookies…

 

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you will head over to enjoy the posts in full..thanks Sally.

Smorgasbord Blogger Daily – Tuesday November 12th 2019 – Pete Springer, Olga Nunez Miret and Anne Stormont


The first post today is by Pete Springer former teacher and author who writes about a recent  incredible project undertaken by the Humboldt County Children’s Author Festival Committee, bringing in 25 authors to talk to children in the district’s school.  Apart from very careful planning to bring the author festival together, planned outages due to recent wildfires threatened to disrupt the planned events… I hope you will head over to find out how it turned out.. well worth it.

Promoting Literacy

What a wild couple of weeks! I hardly know where to begin. Eighteen months ago, I decided to join the Humboldt County Children’s Author Festival Committee. https://www.authorfest.org/. My limited knowledge of this group was based on my past experiences when I was teaching. Every two years, I got to enjoy a beautiful day with my class when a children’s writer would visit our school. Before the author’s visit, the teachers would read many of the author’s books so that the kids could become more familiar with his/her books.

The magical day would arrive, and I so enjoyed watching my students’ faces as they became fully engaged. The authors would share some of their books, how they became an author/illustrator, and convince many children that they too could follow their dreams and become whatever they wanted to be. As I watched my students’ receptive faces, I saw future writers and illustrators born that day.

There were two main reasons I joined this committee: (1) I want to support anything that promotes literacy and education. (2) While I was teaching (I taught thirty-one years in grades 2-6), I dreamed of becoming a children’s author.

Head over to read the rest of this very interesting post: Pete Springer Promoting Literacy

Pete Springer’s book is now in Ebook on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/They-Call-Mom-Difference-Elementary-ebook/dp/B07YBL8DPY

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Pete-Springer/e/B07ZYDPJ3RBlog: https://petespringerauthor.wordpress.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/peter.springer.5876

The next post is from Olga Nunez Miret and is one of her in depth book reviews. This week the fascinating subject of The Mother of the Brontës

The Mother of the Brontës: When Maria Met Patrick by Sharon Wright

Hi all:

Those of you who follow me will know that I have shared my interest in the Brontës and my love for Haworth on many occasions already. And when I saw this book about their mother, I had to read it. And I am very happy I did.

At long last, the untold story of the mysterious Mrs Brontë.

They were from different lands, different classes, different worlds almost.

The chances of Cornish gentlewoman Maria Branwell even meeting the poor Irish curate Patrick Brontë in Regency England, let alone falling passionately in love, were remote.

Yet Maria and Patrick did meet, making a life together as devoted lovers and doting parents in the heartland of the industrial revolution. An unlikely romance and novel wedding were soon followed by the birth of six children. They included Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë, the most gifted literary siblings the world has ever known.

Her children inherited her intelligence and wit and wrote masterpieces such as Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre, and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. Yet Maria has remained an enigma while the fame of her family spread across the world. It is time to bring her out of the shadows, along with her overlooked contribution to the Brontë genius.

Untimely death stalked Maria as it was to stalk all her children. But first there was her fascinating life’s story, told here for the first time by Sharon Wright.

Head over to read Olga’s review in full: The Mother of the Brontes – When Maria Met Patrick – Book Review

Olga Nunez Miret – Buy: http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B009UC58G0
Blog: http://www.authortranslatorolga.com Goodreads: Olga on Goodreads

Please visit Amazon or Olga’s blog to view all her books.

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The final post today is from author Anne Stormont who also writes for children as Anne McAlpine.  Anne was invited to give a talk a the primary school on the Isle of Skye… here is a short excerpt from her post, but I recommend you head over to enjoy the rest.

Author Talk on the Isle of Skye – a bit of writing life away from the desk

Portree Harbour

Writing can be a lonely profession – all that sitting at the desk – alone with your own thoughts. So it’s good to get away from time to time – and it’s even better to be able to combine that with talking about your work and getting to meet readers and prospective readers.

So I was delighted recently to get an invitation to do just that.

I was invited to do an author talk to the Primary 5, 6 and 7 children on the 5th November at Broadford Primary School on the Scottish Isle of Skye. And not only that I was also invited to deliver a writing workshop to the Primary 7 children later on the same day. And of course I would be appearing as my children’s author alter-ego, Anne McAlpine – author of The Silver Locket (for 9 to 12 year-olds), rather than Anne Stormont writer of adult fiction.

I lived and worked as a teacher on the island for many years and the invitation came from a friend who is also a former colleague.

And it was lovely to have a reason to go back. I miss Skye so much that I hadn’t felt able to return during the (almost) three years since I left. But this offer to talk about my work as a writer and to share The Silver Locket with some of its intended readership, was the perfect opportunity to get over myself and return to the place where I left a big part of my heart.

Head over to read the rest of this fascinating post: Author Talk by Anne Stormont

Buy Anne’s books for adults: https://www.amazon.com/Anne-Stormont/e/B004IU0P8KAs Anne McAlpine: https://www.amazon.com/Anne-McAlpine/e/B013BZZQW2Blog/Website: https://anne-stormont.comGoodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5156419.Anne_Stormont

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you will head over and enjoy the post in full. Thanks Sally.

Smorgasbord Blogger Daily – Friday October 4th 2019 – Pete Springer, Beth I Didn’t Have my Glasses on, Janet Gogerty and Jim Borden


This series is an opportunity to showcase posts from around our community and the brilliant bloggers who share with us. It would be amazing if you would follow the links to the post I have highlighted and whilst visiting follow and support the blogger.

The first post today is from Pete Springer who woke up to find that his fence was badly damaged… however, all is not as it may seem and as the day wore on, and evidence came to light, the damage was put into the category of Minor Inconveniences.

We woke up this morning to see that our still relatively new redwood fence (just over a year old) had been thoroughly mashed. When I came in to tell my wife what I had discovered, she remembered hearing a sound that woke her up in the night. I slept through the entire incident. Our neighbors have gently backed into the fence a couple of times, but they have taken responsibility and repaired the damage themselves.

This accident was no minor fender bender; one of the fence posts had broken in two. Knowing there wasn’t much room even to back up a car fast, it was hard to imagine how it had happened.

Some crimes are more troubling than others. Hit and run is one of those types that bothers me. I still remember coming out of a store when I was twenty-years-old and found that somebody had broadsided my beloved first car—my pumpkin orange Chevy Nova.

Head over to Pete’s post to discover how the rest of the story unfolds: https://petespringerauthor.wordpress.com/2019/10/01/minor-inconveniences/

Blog: https://petespringerauthor.wordpress.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/peter.springer.5876

The next post is from Beth of I Didn’t Have My Glasses On... and shares the news that in Japan KitKat will have another look and one that is better for the environment...Origami and Chocolate

it’s important we each do our part to help Mother Earth

and here is a way we can all pitch in,

with two of my favorite things on this earth,

paper and chocolate.

you are welcome.

Japanese KitKats Are Replacing Plastic Packaging

with Origami Paper You Can Turn into Cranes!

From plant-based, bio-plastic Lego to Adidas’s first fully recyclable running shoe, companies worldwide are working hard to make their products and packaging more sustainable. Last year, food and drink manufacturer Nestle announced that it plans to use 100% recyclable packaging for its products by 2025. As part of that goal, nestle Japan recently released new packaging for its popular miniature KitKat chocolate bars, which will now be wrapped in origami paper instead of plastic.

“Plastic waste is one of the biggest sustainability issues the world is facing today,” Nestlé CEO Mark Schneider says “Tackling it requires a collective approach. We are committed to finding improved solutions to reduce, re-use and recycle.” Japan is the biggest market for KitKats, with 4 million being sold every day. By swapping out the candy bar’s shiny plastic wrap for eco-friendly matte paper, Nestlé expects to cut down on roughly 380 tons of plastic each year.

Head over and read the rest of the post, and perhaps KitKats worldwide might follow suit, as origami is a wonderful art that children could benefit from: https://ididnthavemyglasseson.com/2019/09/29/origami-and-chocolate/

Find out more about Beth: https://ididnthavemyglasseson.com/about/

 Janet Gogerty takes us on a tour of the lovely Yorkshire harbour town of Whitby… get your climbing boots on though..The 199 Steps…

Whitby is a scenic harbour town on the east coast of Yorkshire; the harbour piers face north so it has an east and west cliff, both of which are worth clambering up. You don’t have to climb the cliff face, you can arrive at the west cliff hotels or the east cliff abbey ruins by coach, bus or car, but it is more interesting to tread the many paths and steps that wind upwards. Count Dracula took such a route up the east cliff after his ship was blown off course in the north sea. Disguised as a black dog he ran up the 199 steps to the church of St. Mary and the ruins of St. Hilda’s Abbey, thus creating a tourist attraction for the fitter holiday maker.

Head over and enjoy the rest of the photographic tour: https://tidalscribe.wordpress.com/2019/10/02/the-199-steps/

Buy the books: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Janet-Gogerty/e/B00A8FWDMU/ Blog: https://tidalscribe.wordpress.com/  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Beachwriter/

And finally today an inspiring post from Jim Borden about the MacArthur Foundation and one of this year’s recipients, Lisa Daugaard, a Criminal Justice Reformer who has established an effective programme to work with those who are arrested for minor drug crimes.

Every year, the MacArthur Foundation selects between 20 and 30 individuals as MacArthur Fellows, commonly referred to as Genius Grant winners.

The MacArthur Fellows Program is intended to encourage people of outstanding talent to pursue their own creative, intellectual, and professional inclinations. In keeping with this purpose, the Foundation awards fellowships directly to individuals rather than through institutions. Recipients may be writers, scientists, artists, social scientists, humanists, teachers, entrepreneurs, or those in other fields, with or without institutional affiliations. They may use their fellowship to advance their expertise, engage in bold new work, or, if they wish, to change fields or alter the direction of their careers.

Although nominees are reviewed for their achievements, the fellowship is not a lifetime achievement award, but rather an investment in a person’s originality, insight, and potential. Indeed, the purpose of the MacArthur Fellows Program is to enable recipients to exercise their own creative instincts for the benefit of human society.

Please head over to find out more about the MacArthur Foundation, Lisa Daugaard and the LEAD programme, which sounds like it should be applied across jurisdictions: https://jborden.com/2019/09/26/now-this-is-my-kind-of-genius/

Connect to Jim via his Blog: https://jborden.com/about-me/ – Twitter: https://twitter.com/jimborden – Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jborden119 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimborden119/

Thanks for dropping in today and I hope you will head over to enjoy the posts in full.. more next week. thanks Sally