Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Music Column – The Breakfast Show – 1960s Hits Part Two – Special Guests John W. Howell and Jennie Fitzkee


Over the last four weeks we have been featuring the hits in the charts of 1960-1962. We have also included some of the notable events in those years for the up and coming stars who were centre stage at the time. You can find these posts:The Breakfast Show with hosts William Price King and Sally Cronin

We will be sharing the music of the 1960s until the end of May before moving on to the 1970s. Participate in the spin-off shows and share your memories of the music of the 60s. An opportunity to share your work and here are the details: The Breakfast Show 2021

The first guest today is John W. Howell who shares his wonderful memories of the 1960s and his time as a D.J on radio.

John in the 1960s

Thanks, Sally for allowing me to give my impressions of the decade of 60s music.

When I look back on the 60s, my memories always go to the very earliest part of that decade. I had graduated from high school and was off to college. I left a high school sweetheart behind, and of course, time and distance do not make suitable relationship binders. The relationship fell apart, and so there were plenty of songs to help balm the bruised heart. In May of 1960, Roy Orbison released his biggest hit, “Only the Lonely.” This song became my anthem for the rest of the year.

In addition to losing what I thought was the only love of my life, I was also serving as a class officer, so I tended to work hard to avoid thinking of my problems. The term ended, and it was time for the summer break. The biggest song that wouldn’t go away was “Theme from a Summer Place” by Percy Faith. I can still imagine us all at the drive-in restaurant with the radios up loud, trying to convince our dates that we were in love.

School came back into session, and around October 1960, Edith Piaf released her finest song Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien. Edith and I went way back. When I was ten, my father passed away, and I collected Edith Piaf records. They ended up almost unplayable after I listened to them hundreds of times. For some reason, her story and her songs gave me a lot of comfort. Her release of the record brought back the earlier sadness. More importantly, the song with Edith singing it had the effect of making me realize I had weathered the storm and had nothing to regret. So I offer as my favorite 1960’s song Edith Piaf and “Non Je Ne Regrette Rien.” ondrejtis 

John Howell turned to writing as a full-time occupation after an extensive career in business. John writes thriller fiction novels and short stories. His story Cold Night Out won an honorable mention in Writers Digest Popular Fiction contest this year. He also won first place in the Kurt Vonnegut Kilgore Trout novel contest, celebrating Kurt Vonnegut as an author. His short story Never Give Inn was selected to be published in the Miracle E-zine fifth issue published in April of 2014. Since then John has published three books in the John Cannon thriller series, a novel Circumstances of Childhood, a collaboration with Gwen Plano, The Contract a paranormal thriller, and his latest release Eternal Road an adventure in the afterlife.

John lives in Lakeway Texas with his wife Molly and their spoiled rescue pets.

Books by John Howell

Read the reviews for John’s books: Amazon USand : Amazon UK – Goodreads:John Howell Goodreads Blog: John W. Howell. com – Twitter@HowellWave

The final guest this weekend is Jennie Fitzkee who shares the music that she grew up with and which she now shares with the children in her class every morning.

A new generation discovering the music of the 1960s

My parents had a HiFi that was off limits to me and my sisters. I was fascinated by the record changer and being able to stack multiple records at one time. They loved playing albums, particularly Frank Sinatra albums. His music remains a favorite of mine to this day. Do you know that young children need to hear soft jazz in the background at school? Yup, I play Frank at school every morning.

And then it was 1962.

I discovered American Bandstand on TV. Every rock and roll song was played. Teenagers voted on the songs. And oh, the dancing! I was on my feet for the entire show. That fall I started in a new school, 7th through 12th grade. The lunch cafeteria was in the basement, and there was another room with a juke box. The juniors and seniors always played songs and danced. I walked in on my first day and listened to “Do You Love Me” by the Contours. That was it. I was in rock and roll Seventh Heaven, and still am. R&B was in my blood.

And then it was 1964.

The Beatles had made their first record album, “Meet the Beatles.” I remember going downtown to the department store and buying the album with my babysitting money. I have played it hundreds of times. I still play the album. It was “ I Want To Hold Your Hand” that sent me to the moon. I’ve been there ever since. February 9, 1964, I forced my parents to watch Ed Sullivan and even threatened anyone who dared talk. It was wonderful.

My love of rock and roll and R&B has never waned. As the music grew, I did too. From the Supremes to Janis Joplin, this was a decade of great music. Woodstock is still one of my favorites albums. I bring my 1960’s music into my classroom, playing my albums on a record player. This is fascinating for children. They love the music as much as I do. Most recently a Boston Massachusetts robotics company videoed their robots at Boston Logan Airport dancing to “Do You Love Me”. I nearly jumped out of my skin when I saw this! I showed this to the children many times, and we have written a letter to the company.
“One of my favorite songs is “Twist and Shout.” The original is by the Isley Brothers, and the redo is by the Beatles. Both are terrific! I danced and did the Twist in stocking feet till I had no stockings left on the bottom of my feet.”

Good music never goes away!

Here is the Beatles version “Twist And Shout” The Beatles

About Jennie Fitzkee

I have been teaching preschool for over thirty years. This is my passion. I believe that children have a voice, and that is the catalyst to enhance or even change the learning experience. Emergent curriculum opens young minds. It’s the little things that happen in the classroom that are most important and exciting. That’s what I write about.

I am highlighted in the the new edition of Jim Trelease’s bestselling book, “The Read-Aloud Handbook” because of my reading to children. My class has designed quilts that hang as permanent displays at both the National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia, and the Fisher House at the Boston VA Hospital.

Connect to Jennie – Blog: Jennie Fitzkee – Facebook: Jennie Fitzkee – Twitter: @jlfatgcs

 

Thanks for joining us today and as always we would love your feedback..you can all the Tuesday Breakfast Shows so far in the directory Here

Smorgasbord Reblog – #Pre-School Nature is the Greatest Teacher for Children by Jennie Fitzkee


Jennie Fitzkee is back at school and shares how valuable it is for children to spend time outside exploring nature and discovering new things for themselves.. Head over to the post to read the newsletter that Jennie sends to the parents including some great photos of children learning by experiencing.

Nature is the Greatest Teacher for Children by Jennie Fitzkee

Covid-19 has actually made teachers rethink how to best teach young children. At school, we decided that spending more time outside is better for children. We teachers all know the benefits of nature, yet the demands of what children need to learn, including providing opportunities for technology, have pushed nature aside over the years.

Not this year!

At last we are back to basics, the root of investigating and discovery. Thank goodness.

The erosion of outdoor play in schools, and also art and music, has been a thorn in my side for decades. Parents want their child to succeed, and they think computer programs and phonics are the way to go. They want school to have straight instruction. The problem is, children need to figure things out on their own, and that happens with teacher and parent support, not direction.

Public schools answer to parents. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if they could educate parents? Schools might look different. I figured this out decades ago. If I educate parents, I am helping the child, too. Parents are always hungry to learn, and isn’t it better to learn straight from the teacher? Makes perfect sense to me.

That is why I write newsletters to families. They soak up everything, because they care about their child and they truly want to learn.

Back to the topic of nature… here is the newsletter I sent to families. I will be able to build upon this and explain in detail how math and science and writing and stories ‘happen’.

Hi Families,

Head over to read the newsletter and enjoy seeing children’s engagement at being out and about: Nature is the Greatest Teacher for Children by Jennie Fitzkee

About Jennie Fitzkee

I have been teaching preschool for over thirty years. This is my passion. I believe that children have a voice, and that is the catalyst to enhance or even change the learning experience. Emergent curriculum opens young minds. It’s the little things that happen in the classroom that are most important and exciting. That’s what I write about.

I am highlighted in the the new edition of Jim Trelease’s bestselling book, “The Read-Aloud Handbook” because of my reading to children. My class has designed quilts that hang as permanent displays at both the National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia, and the Fisher House at the Boston VA Hospital.

Connect to Jennie – Blog: Jennie Fitzkee – Facebook: Jennie Fitzkee – Twitter: @jlfatgcs

 

Thanks for dropping by and I hope you will head over to read Jennie’s post in full thanks Sally.

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #PreSchool – The Story of Romana by Jennie Fitzkee


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives in 2020 and if you would like to participate with two of your posts from 2019, you will find all the details in this post: New series of Posts from Your Archives 2020

Pre-school teacher of over 30 years, Jennie Fitzkee, has been a welcome guest here many times and this is her first post in 2020. This week Jennie shares the lovely story of a little girl from Romania and her family.

The Story of Romana

Romana was from Romania. She was the kindest little girl. She spoke very little English, yet she clearly enjoyed school. She is the child on the far right with the biggest smile.

I remember the day I took this photo. We were playing a game of Musical Chairs. In my version, every time the music stops I take away a chair. Children have to find a lap of another child to sit on. When we get down to two or three chairs, it is a scramble. The squeals and laughing say it all.

Romana loved this game. She also loved art. As a three-year-old she helped illustrate our classroom God Bless America book.

Romana was a born giver. She noticed everything. She loved Milly the Quilter.

The following year her younger sister, Stefana, was in my class. She was a delight. Then their little brother, Vlad, joined school. I loved these children.

I learned much about family traditions and culture in Romania. When Romana was five or six, she went to Romania – alone – to spend much of the summer with her grandparents. They only spoke Romanian.

And then the unthinkable happened. Their father became sick with cancer and died in a relatively short period of time. His mother came to America from Romania to see her son before he died. I went to their house to take care of the children so the adults could have some time together. That was so sad!

I will never forget the funeral. I’d never been to a Greek Orthodox funeral. It was formal, with an open casket. Children were in a playroom downstairs, yet Romana came into the sanctuary, saw me, and climbed up onto my lap for much of the funeral. She was fine. I held it together.

Over the next few years I visited, always bringing my autoharp and a stack of books. We played, sang, danced, and read stories. It was delightful.

Time moves on and so do children and their families. Last week the family stopped by school to say hello and goodbye, as they are moving out of town. I wasn’t there! So, they wrote messages to me on the chalkboard, and climbed up on the loft in my classroom to make me a video.

©Jennie Fitzkee

About Jennie Fitzkee

I have been teaching preschool for over thirty years. This is my passion. I believe that children have a voice, and that is the catalyst to enhance or even change the learning experience. Emergent curriculum opens young minds. It’s the little things that happen in the classroom that are most important and exciting. That’s what I write about.

I am highlighted in the the new edition of Jim Trelease’s bestselling book, “The Read-Aloud Handbook” because of my reading to children. My class has designed quilts that hang as permanent displays at both the National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia, and the Fisher House at the Boston VA Hospital.

Connect to Jennie

Blog: Jennie Fitzkee
Facebook: Jennie Fitzkee
Twitter: @jlfatgcs

My thanks to Jennie for permitting me to share this posts from her archives and I know she would love your feedback. thanks Sally.

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #PreSchool – From Little House on the Prairie, to Geography, to Maps, to Mount Rushmore, to History… And More by Jennie Fitzkee


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives in 2020 and if you would like to participate with two of your posts from 2019, you will find all the details in this post: New series of Posts from Your Archives 2020

Pre-school teacher of over 30 years, Jennie Fitzkee, has been a welcome guest here many times and this is her first post in 2020. Jennie shares how the simple act of reading a story can lead to questions that take you in many directions, all of them a learning opportunity.

From Little House on the Prairie, to Geography, to Maps, to Mount Rushmore, to History… And More

When good reading happens in my classroom, it opens the door to so many other things. Children have questions and ideas. Interrupting in the middle of chapter reading means children are listening and interested. I can answer those questions and get back to reading, or I can do more and follow through on those questions.

I do more and follow through on those questions.

It’s called emergent curriculum. Here’s how it goes: a teacher reads, or gives a lesson. Children (or a single child) ask a question or make a comment. That comment leads to something interesting yet completely different. It’s like taking children into the woods and finding divergent paths, and then a child asks “Why can’t we climb a tree to see where they go?”

Here’s what happened this week:

I chapter read at rest time, and always walk over to each child to show them the picture at the end of the story. Eddie had fallen asleep and missed the picture. When children woke up…

Eddie: “Jennie, you forgot to show me the picture.”

Me: “Eddie, you fell asleep. Would you like to see the picture now?”

Of course he did. And the other children did, too. So, we gathered around the table to see the picture together. Children shoved in like a can of sardines. My book is old and falling apart. Somehow that makes it all the more wonderful. Children instinctively know its ‘been around the block’ many times, and they have a reverence, as if the book itself has many stories to tell.

We looked at the picture Eddie missed. We looked at more pictures. And children started to ask to see the pictures they remember.

“Jennie, where is the picture of Ma when the log fell on her foot?”

“Jennie, where is the picture of Bunny?”

“Jennie, why did Jack always walk under the wagon? Didn’t they go a long way?”

The window of opportunity just opened.

“I think Jack liked walking. He must have had plenty of rest every night. They did go a long way. They started in Wisconsin… wait, let me get the map book so we can see.”

We followed the pathway, starting in Wisconsin. The can of sardines suddenly became very tight. My finger went across the river to Minnesota (stopping to remember crossing the river), then down to Iowa and Missouri, then across to Kansas. Hearing the words in the story is best, seeing those words come alive in pictures makes it stick. So, I left the book and the map book out for children to explore.

“Jennie, where is the river they crossed?”

We found the Mississippi River. I traced it to the Gulf of Mexico. I told children that all rivers go into the ocean. And then we traced all the rivers on the big map book. It was ‘I Spy meets geography’. Learning is fun.

Mac looked at the map book carefully. He had been quiet all along. Then he pointed to something on the map book – four faces. “What’s that?”

Another window of opportunity presents itself: Mount Rushmore in South Dakota, which has no correlation to Little House on the Prairie. That’s how emergent curriculum works. Small windows of opportunity that must be grabbed, seizing the moment.

Oh, how we talked about Mount Rushmore! While we learned who the presidents were – no interest to preschoolers – I switched to carving the stone. Preschoolers like building, and they can understand carving.

“Mac, if you were carving Mount Rushmore, you would be much smaller than any of the noses.” I described this in every possible way. It was no use. Mac and the others could not understand how big the monument is, and how they would be smaller than a nose. A picture is worth a thousand words.

Looking at this photo, children have never been so quiet. They gained a piece of understanding and appreciation. It was chapter reading that brought them through a great journey of learning. Thank goodness we got off the track.

Jennie
©Jennie Fitzkee

About Jennie Fitzkee

I have been teaching preschool for over thirty years. This is my passion. I believe that children have a voice, and that is the catalyst to enhance or even change the learning experience. Emergent curriculum opens young minds. It’s the little things that happen in the classroom that are most important and exciting. That’s what I write about.

I am highlighted in the the new edition of Jim Trelease’s bestselling book, “The Read-Aloud Handbook” because of my reading to children. My class has designed quilts that hang as permanent displays at both the National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia, and the Fisher House at the Boston VA Hospital.

Connect to Jennie

Blog: Jennie Fitzkee
Facebook: Jennie Fitzkee
Twitter: @jlfatgcs

My thanks to Jennie for permitting me to share this posts from her archives and I know she would love your feedback. thanks Sally.