Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives -#NewSeries August 2020- Pot Luck – #School Closures – Lost? by Stevie Turner in Having a Rant


Welcome to the current series of Posts from Your Archives… and I will be picking two posts from the blogs of those participating from the first six months of 2020. If you don’t mind me rifling through your archives… just let me know in the comments or you can find out the full scope: Posts from Your Archives – Pot Luck – 2020

This is the first post from author Stevie Turner and it is definitely a discussion piece.

This has been a challenging couple of terms for children who have been home-schooled. Especially those who were due to take critical exams this year… Stevie poses some interesting questions and also makes some observations that are reflected in the comments.. I am sure she would love to hear yours… Personally, I believe there are some great young people out there but they don’t get enough publicity as they are not seen as newsworthy by the majority of the media.

Lost? by Stevie Turner in Having a Rant

I feel I must have a mini-rant here. I know it’s a controversial topic, but hey, I’ll carry on and you can always skip on down if your blood starts to boil…

Students who were to sit GCSEs and A Level examinations this year in the UK have had 4 months of disruption to their education. They have been given work to do at home (my granddaughter has received merit awards for the amount of work she has completed) and will receive calculated grades based on their mock exam results and past assessments. Vulnerable children have not had their education disrupted at all, as they were still allowed to go to school, along with children of key workers. Students will receive results in August that will be accepted by universities and colleges.

Secretary General Antonio Guterres talked about a ‘lost generation of youth‘ back in April due to the impact of Covid-19 on education and future employment. Apparently one third of employees aged 16 -24 have had to be furloughed on reduced pay. However, one does tend to wonder whether a percentage of these ‘lost youths’ have been enjoying themselves sitting on UK beaches or in parks during lock-down?

Compare this to my father’s generation. He was born in 1927 in East London and by the time he was 12 he had to leave school altogether due to the impact of WWII. He never had the chance to go to school again. My mother, 4 years older than my dad, went to work as normal throughout WWII, and even throughout the Blitz. There was no talk of being furloughed on 80% of pay. If you didn’t work, then you didn’t eat. One evening she told me she sat in the front room of her flat and suddenly there was a terrible noise and all the windows imploded. She ran out onto the balcony and there were gaps in the street where houses had stood only minutes previously.

There was no counselling to get over the shock of the implosion or of being bombed for 5 years; it was a case of suck it up and get on with it, and get on with the food rationing as well. Can you imagine the majority of people these days having to live on the meagre rations of wartime?

My parents were intelligent people who worked all their lives and never had a chance to sit exams and go to university, and the scars of war affected them for life. As an older man Dad spent hours listening to instructional records and trying to teach himself (he learned a couple of languages for example). I think their generation and also the youth of WWI were the real ‘lost’ generations. Have the youth of today really ‘lost’ out by not going to school for 4 months? What do you think?

As an aside, both my sons did not gain even one A Level at school. Instead they left school with a great deal of relief and began 4-year apprenticeships which gave them day release to college where they passed exams relevant to their future careers. One is now the general manager of a precision engineering company, and the other is a regional account manager of a national company. They grew up on leaving school and suddenly gained motivation and a desire to succeed. You can drive the student to school, but you can’t make him learn. The desire to learn has to come from within. If today’s youth want to learn, then they will. If they don’t, then they’ll go and sit on the beach.

©Stevie Turner 2020

About Stevie Turner

Stevie Turner works part time as a medical secretary in a busy NHS hospital and writes suspense, women’s fiction, and darkly humorous novels in her spare time. She won a New Apple Book Award in 2014 and a Readers’ Favorite Gold Award in 2015 for her book ‘A House Without Windows’, and one of her short stories, ‘Checking Out’, was published in the Creative Writing Institute’s 2016 anthology ‘Explain!’ Her psychological thriller ‘Repent at Leisure’ won third place in the 2016 Drunken Druid Book Award contest.

Stevie lives in the East of England, and is married with two sons and four grandchildren. She has also branched out into the world of audio books, screenplays, and translations. Most of her novels are now available as audio books, and one screenplay, ‘For the Sake of a Child’, won a silver award in the Spring 2017 Depth of Field International Film Festival. ‘A House Without Windows’ gained the attention of a New York media production company in December 2017.

Some of Stevie’s books are currently being translated into German, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese.

A selection of Stevie’s books.

A recent review for Finding David  on Goodreads

Jul 01, 2020 Pete Springer rated it Five Stars it was amazing

What would you do if the person you are married to becomes a murder suspect? Not just any murder—one that involves her son, David. Karen faces this dilemma after Rae, a gifted clairvoyant medium, provides information that suggests that her husband, Mick, may be responsible. To complicate matters, the police sergeant refuses to offer any help after he finds out that Rae claims the deceased spirit of the boy has provided this information.

Karen has complete faith in Rae, but Mick thinks Rae is trying to swindle money with a hoax reading. Is the murderer Karen, Mick, or someone else?

Several elements made Finding David an engaging read. One appealing quality is the relationship that Mick had with David. Because neither character liked the other, this made for some fascinating family dynamics.

Stevie Turner doesn’t waste time getting right into the meat of the story. There were no lulls, and my mind did not wander at any point because the plot was gripping. Take two hours to read this excellent tale and put yourself in Karen’s shoes

Read the reviews and buy the books : Amazon US – And: Amazon UK – Follow Stevie : Goodreads  blog: Stevie Turner on WordPress – Twitter: @StevieTurner6

Thank you for joining us today and I know Stevie would love to receive your feedback. You can also read the comments on the original post: Lost?

Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore – Share an Extract #Mystery Finding David by Stevie Turner


Welcome to the new Cafe and Bookstore  New Series 2020 – Share an Extract with an opportunity to show one of your earlier books some love and attention by sharing an extract.. Check out the above link for all the details.

Today’s author is Stevie Turner and she is sharing an extract from her mystery Finding David.

About the book

When Karen and Mick Curtis attend a demonstration of clairvoyance for the first time, Karen is singled out by the medium, Rae Cordelle. Rae has a message from Karen’s son David, who passed over to the spirit world many years before. The message shocks Karen and sends her on a journey of discovery, rocking her previously happy relationship with second husband Mick, David’s stepfather.

An extract from Finding David – Chapter One – Rae

She risked a sneaky peep around the curtain; every seat in Croydon’s grandly named Athaneum was taken. Desperate for a miracle, rows of overweight middle aged women waited impatiently. A cacophony of chatter filled the air. Women laughed nervously or threw a few words to the odd unsmiling husband sitting in stolid disbelief with arms crossed as if to ward off evil spirits.

The usual high-pitched buzz of anticipation echoed off the walls. Rae Cordelle patted her black bobbed hair into place, stepped back into the wings, and took a deep breath. “There’s a good crowd tonight.”

Medicine Horse, six foot seven inches of calm serenity in loincloth and full Apache feathered headdress, emitted a comforting presence as he stood in quiet contemplation by her side.

“I am here to guide you, as always.”

Rae gave a nod of approval. “Many thanks. May God be with us tonight.”

Peter Jones, Spiritualist Preacher, raised a water jug towards her in salutation as he slipped through the curtain. All at once Rae heard silence from the discordant hell of many raised voices.

“Ladies and gentlemen, we have a remarkable and gifted clairvoyant medium here with us tonight. I want you to give a big hand to … Rae Cordelle!”

The stagehand pulled back the curtains. Rae, already desperate for the soothing balm of water, walked towards the table to polite applause as the preacher ceased his theatrical posturing and sat down beside her.

“Thank you Peter.” She filled a glass and took a refreshing sip. “It’s lovely to be here.”

Arms folded and his features inscrutable, Medicine Horse stood sentinel at the back of the hall. Rae felt the burning stares of at least two hundred pairs of eyes.

“Has anybody seen me work before?”

A couple of hands shot up while a gabble of deceased spirits jostled for first position in a queue behind Medicine Horse.

“Well, for the others here that haven’t attended a demonstration of clairvoyance before, don’t worry. If you see anything scary I’ll be the first one out of the door, ahead of you all!”

Rae felt the tense atmosphere lighten a fraction, as a titter erupted amongst the cauliflower heads and bald pates. She took another sip of water, and carried on.

“And if your relative was a miserable old bugger in this world, you can bet your bottom dollar he’ll be just as miserable in the next!”

Rae perched on the edge of the table until the laughter had ceased.

“I’m clairvoyant. That means I can see Spirits.” She paused to let the effect of her words sink in. “I first became aware of this gift when I was eight years old. My grandmother came into my room in the middle of the night and woke me up. I thought it strange at the time, because I’d been told she was in hospital over a hundred miles away. She told me she had died, and to let my mother know that she was quite happy and no longer in pain.”

Rae looked around the room. Every pair of eyes were fixed upon her.

“I raced into my parents’ room shouting out what my grandmother had said. Mum sat up in bed just as the phone rang. It was the night staff at the hospital telling her that her mother had died ten minutes before.”

One of the recent reviews for Finding David.

Anita Dawes 5.0 out of 5 stars  Well written, but disturbing story…  Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 17 March 2020

Hoping for a message from her son David, who disappeared years ago, Karen attends a Spiritual meeting with her husband, Mick. Through the medium, Karen receives a message from her son. This message shocks her and sends her on a journey of discovery, rocking the foundations of her marriage.

Her husband Mick is not a believer in these things and aggressively refuses to believe that David blames him for his death. This was a classic misunderstanding, for Mick is David’s stepfather.

Right from the beginning, I hoped the child would be found alive. I found myself wondering what I would do in those circumstances. The message would have to be convincing, like something no one else would know, for there are many so called mediums out there who prey on the vulnerable. I don’t understand what drives people to these meetings, surely it must only bring more heartache?

It was particularly distressing to witness the destruction of Karen’s marriage, although the husband’s attitude didn’t help. The author has done a brilliant job of creating a devastating story and believable characters, sometimes a little too realistic!

The medium in this story and the story itself, are remarkable, very believable, especially the effect this discovery had on the parents of the missing child. Finding David isn’t very long, but it certainly packs a punch…

Read the reviews and buy the book: Amazon UK

And: Amazon US

A small selection of other books by Stevie Turner

Special offer – Memoir: Waiting in the Wings 99p/99c until the end of May –  Amazon Universal

Read all the reviews and buy the books: Amazon US

And: Amazon UK

Follow Stevie Turner on: Goodreads

About Stevie Turner

Stevie Turner works part time as a medical secretary in a busy NHS hospital and writes suspense, women’s fiction, and darkly humorous novels in her spare time. She won a New Apple Book Award in 2014 and a Readers’ Favorite Gold Award in 2015 for her book ‘A House Without Windows’, and one of her short stories, ‘Checking Out’, was published in the Creative Writing Institute’s 2016 anthology ‘Explain!’ Her psychological thriller ‘Repent at Leisure’ won third place in the 2016 Drunken Druid Book Award contest.

Stevie lives in the East of England, and is married with two sons and four grandchildren. She has also branched out into the world of audio books, screenplays, and translations. Most of her novels are now available as audio books, and one screenplay, ‘For the Sake of a Child’, won a silver award in the Spring 2017 Depth of Field International Film Festival. ‘A House Without Windows’ gained the attention of a New York media production company in December 2017.

Some of Stevie’s books are currently being translated into German, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese.

Connect to Stevie Turner

Website: Stevie Turner Author
Twitter: @StevieTurner6
Blog: Stevie Turner WordPress
Pinterest: Stevie Turner
YouTube: Stevie Turner

Thanks for dropping in and if you are an author in the Cafe and Bookstore and would like to promote one of your early books then please check out the post: New Series 2020 – Share an Extract 

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives #Family and #Friends – Chess by Stevie Turner


Welcome to the new posts from your archives with a theme of family and friends. Very important as our support system at the moment as many of us are isolated and out of physical touch. If you would like details on how to participate here is the link: Posts from Your Archives April 2020 Family and Friends

Author Stevie Turner shares her memories of being taught to play chess by her father and the subsequent losses and victories over the years as she mastered the game.

Chess by Stevie Turner

My father unfortunately died far too young at only 49. However, he was a great teacher, and when I was about 8 or 9 he taught me how to play Chess.

20487182 - young boy playing chess on the competitions

Licence Obtained Copyright: photozi / 123RF Stock Photo

Most early evenings we would sit opposite each other at the chessboard after I had finished playing outside. Internet, together with mobile phones and iPads pinging and buzzing were a thing of the future, and there were no distractions. Mum liked to read, we didn’t have a landline phone, and the TV stayed off unless there was something interesting to watch.

Over a period of time I became rather better at planning my next move on the board. I never did manage to win any game against my father though, despite Mum telling Dad to let me win sometimes so that I wouldn’t want to give up. It didn’t occur to me to give up, because I always thought that someday I would beat him.

He taught me well enough for me to beat my uncle when I was 12. Dad was as proud as proud could be, although my uncle was somewhat less enthusiastic. This spurred me on to challenge Dad again and again, but with just the same disappointing results.

I was pleased to discover that my future husband-to-be also played Chess. After beating Sam at least 5 times in succession, he refused to play against me any more. Likewise both our sons refused as well, when they became teenagers; it was just too embarrassing to be beaten by a girl. Hey ho, it was all down to challenging the computer; I couldn’t win at all on the higher level, but managed a few victories on the less cerebral ones.

Dear old Dad. Every time I see a chessboard I think of him. I have a chess game on my iPad now, and if I get stuck I often think of what kind of move Dad might have made. I can even hear him in my inner ear telling me to ‘take that rook’ or ‘protect your king’. I’ve lost track of our old board and Chess pieces; I still remember the worn wooden box with its many scratches that we stacked the pieces in when it was time for my bath and bed. It had a special smell that made me think of my childhood and my dad. I think one of my sons might have it now, or possibly it might be right at the back of our loft.

Chess should be on the national curriculum for schoolchildren. It causes children to sit still and concentrate the mind, and it encourages lateral thinking. We could do with more chess-playing youngsters!

©Stevie Turner 2017

My thanks to Stevie for sharing this love post of memories and a great suggestion that children should be taught to play chess, I have not played for years but I imagine at this current moment in time, games are be brought out of the attic or taken out of cupboards and a new generation of fans might emerge.

A selection of books by Stevie Turner

One of the recent reviews for Finding David

Anita Dawes 5.0 out of 5 stars  Well written, but disturbing story…  Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 17 March 2020

Hoping for a message from her son David, who disappeared years ago, Karen attends a Spiritual meeting with her husband, Mick. Through the medium, Karen receives a message from her son. This message shocks her and sends her on a journey of discovery, rocking the foundations of her marriage.

Her husband Mick is not a believer in these things and aggressively refuses to believe that David blames him for his death. This was a classic misunderstanding, for Mick is David’s stepfather.

Right from the beginning, I hoped the child would be found alive. I found myself wondering what I would do in those circumstances. The message would have to be convincing, like something no one else would know, for there are many so called mediums out there who prey on the vulnerable. I don’t understand what drives people to these meetings, surely it must only bring more heartache?

It was particularly distressing to witness the destruction of Karen’s marriage, although the husband’s attitude didn’t help. The author has done a brilliant job of creating a devastating story and believable characters, sometimes a little too realistic!

The medium in this story and the story itself, are remarkable, very believable, especially the effect this discovery had on the parents of the missing child. Finding David isn’t very long, but it certainly packs a punch…

Read all the reviews and buy the books: Amazon US

And: Amazon UK

Follow Stevie Turner on: Goodreads

About Stevie Turner

Stevie Turner works part time as a medical secretary in a busy NHS hospital and writes suspense, women’s fiction, and darkly humorous novels in her spare time. She won a New Apple Book Award in 2014 and a Readers’ Favorite Gold Award in 2015 for her book ‘A House Without Windows’, and one of her short stories, ‘Checking Out’, was published in the Creative Writing Institute’s 2016 anthology ‘Explain!’ Her psychological thriller ‘Repent at Leisure’ won third place in the 2016 Drunken Druid Book Award contest.

Stevie lives in the East of England, and is married with two sons and four grandchildren. She has also branched out into the world of audio books, screenplays, and translations. Most of her novels are now available as audio books, and one screenplay, ‘For the Sake of a Child’, won a silver award in the Spring 2017 Depth of Field International Film Festival. ‘A House Without Windows’ gained the attention of a New York media production company in December 2017.

Some of Stevie’s books are currently being translated into German, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese.

Connect to Stevie Turner

Website: Stevie Turner Author
Facebook: Stevie Turner Author
Twitter: @StevieTurner6
Blog: Stevie Turner WordPress
Pinterest: Stevie Turner Author
YouTube: Stevie Turner

Thanks again to Stevie and if you have stories about family and friends you would like to share then here are the details again: Posts from Your Archives April 2020 Family and Friends

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – Author Update #Reviews – Mary Smith, Bette A. Stevens and Stevie Turner


Welcome to the second of the weekly updates for authors in the Cafe and Bookstore.

The first author today with a recent review is Mary Smith for her non-fiction book Secret Dumfries.

About the book

Dumfries, in south-west Scotland, has a long history, much of it well recorded. However, as with most places there are more than a few secrets hidden away. First referred to as the Queen of the South by a local poet, David Dunbar in 1857, the name stuck and was later adopted by the local football team. Not many know this makes it the only football team in the world mentioned in the Bible. Darker aspects of the town s history include the burning of nine witches on the Whitesands in 1659 and the last public hanging of a woman in Scotland, Mary Timney, was held in Dumfries in 1862. There are tales of plague victims being exiled to Scabbit Isle, of murderers and grave robbers. Not all its secrets are so dark: there s Patrick Miller and his introduction of turnips courtesy of King Gustav III of Sweden, and the exiled Norwegian Army making its home in Dumfries during the Second World War. And what is the significance of the finials depicting telescopes and anchors on the railings along the Whitesands?

Local author Mary Smith, and photographer Keith Kirk, take the reader on a fascinating journey through the town’s past, unearthing tales of intrigue and grisly goings-on as they provide a fascinating glimpse into some of the lesser known aspects of the town’s history.

A recent review of the book

Secret Dumfries is a non-fiction book depicting the fascinating history of Dumfries, a small town situated on the River Nith in Scotland. Dumfries is also known as the “Queen of the South”, a name bestowed on the town by local poet David Dunbar.

The book is divided into ten chapters each dealing with different aspects of the town, its inhabitants and its history.

Chapter 1: History provides a lot of background to the development and establishment of the town. One particularly interesting historical event was the stabbing of “The Red” Comyn by Robert the Bruce which changed the course of Scottish history.

Chapter 2 deals with Crime and Punishment and one of the titbits of information disclosed in this chapter is that in sixteenth-century Dumfries, anyone caught stealing his neighbour’s peat was branded on the cheek with the towns clock key, heated in a fire made of the stolen peats.

Chapter 3: Health, shares facts and information about the history of disease and illness in the town including outbreaks of the plague, famine and cholera.

Chapter 4 entitled Industrial Dumfries tells the stories about the development of industry in Dumfries. One of the industries discussed is the quarrying for sandstone at Locharbriggs Quarry. This sandstone is a lovely pink to red colour and is clearly detectable as the building material for most of the historical buildings in the town.

Chapter 5 deals with Wartime Dumfries and tells of the backgrounds of famous Doonhammers during times of warfare, including Joseph Brown who fought in the Crimea War and the Indian Mutiny.

Chapter 6: Outdoor Art Gallery describes the lovely outdoor artworks found throughout the town including a collection of unusual finials on the railings along the Whitesands beside the Nith. There are thirty-eight of these finials which were created by Natalie Vardey and designed to link to past and present trades in Dumfries.

Chapter 7: Remarable Doonhammers includes details on a number of interesting residents of the town, the most renown being Robert Burns and his wife, Jean Armour. Interestingly enough, the book discloses that Robert Burns body was dug up twice before it was finally laid to rest in its current mausoleum.

Chapter 8 advises visitors to remember to look up and provides information on all the artworks and historical artifacts above eye level including some facts about the fire marks on selected buildings.

Chapter 9: Recreation provides the history of, inter alia, the Dumfries football team, the name of which is Queen of the South. It also tells of the history of the Dumfries cinemas and even the circus.

Chapter 10: Curiosities, Mysteries and a Sad Story ends with a poignant tale about Tinker, or Derek Styles, a promising young man who was psychologically ruined by the horrors he witnessed during the battle for Goose green in May 1982.

Secret Dumfries is a well written and interesting non-fiction book and I would recommend it to anyone interested in Scottish history.

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Secret-Dumfries-Mary-Smith-ebook/dp/B07DWXHGTF

And Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Dumfries-Mary-Smith-ebook/dp/B07DWXHGTF

A selection of other books by Mary Smith

51yks9fxhfl-_uy250_ 51ujjsusehl-_uy250_ 51arfsi2ffl-_uy250_

Read the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mary-Smith/e/B001KCD4P0

And Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Mary-Smith/e/B001KCD4P0

Read more reviews and follow Mary on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5239367.Mary_Smith

Connect to Mary via her blog: https://marysmithsplace.wordpress.com/

The next author with a recent review is Bette A. Stevens for her poetry collection My Maine.

About My Maine

Inspired by The Pine Tree State—Maine’s diverse landscape, natural beauty, rural communities, and independent people—the author’s 150 haiku poems, along with her photographs, reflect the Maine she knows and loves. Bette A. Stevens’s imagery draws the reader into her world of wonder and delight. My Maine takes readers on a poetic journey through Maine’s four seasons. Whether you’re a native Mainer or from away, Stevens’s short story poems and photographs will resonate.

The collection opens with a haiku tribute, “Maine Pines and People.” The journey continues with the rejuvenating spirit of “Spring Awakenings” and “Summer Songs”; then on to more of the magic and majesty of the places and people of Maine in “Autumn Leaves” and “Winter Tales.” This is a poetry collection to be slowly savored, made even more delectable with the author’s original drawings and photographs. In addition to its poems and photographs, My Maine includes state symbols and interesting facts about The Pine Tree State.

One of the recent reviews for the book

My Maine: Haiku through the Seasons by Bette Stevens is an exhilarating journey through the seasons, brilliantly defined in the form of haiku, each one a vivid treat for lovers of nature. Bette takes us along as she walks through the breathtaking woods and vales of The Pine State. Here, spring emerges from ‘wintery boughs,’ breaking their stony silence, as birds, bees and butterflies return to lend a riotous glimmer to the landscape. We watch in delight as mother earth divests her icy mantle, blossoms smile in harmony with the clouds as they roll in to add their sparkle to them. The shimmer brightens with the rich imagery of the poet. Awestruck, I walk further to explore more of Maine!

Summer sounds come alive in these haiku and I could almost see and hear the revelry that mingles with the ‘red, white and blue hues’ – craft fairs, festivals, dinners and timeless tales evoked by ‘crispy, crunchy leaves’ are retold by Stevens in a succinct manner. Life comes full circle as ‘icy crystal robes’ return, ‘lilacs stand naked’ and the poet is enchanted by white confetti falling on white pines! Bette’s style is so captivating that one reading of this book is not enough. I have read it twice but would keep returning to this book to savor the charm that flows through it. My favorite picture is the one with a clear rainbow heralding spring. A must read!

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07SSNDL5L

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/My-Maine-Haiku-through-Seasons-ebook/dp/B07SSNDL5L

Also by Bette A. Stevens

Read all the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Bette-A.-Stevens/e/B009GOYT1M

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bette-A.-Stevens/e/B009GOYT1M

Read more reviews and follow Bette on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6037707.Bette_A_Stevens

Connect to Bette A. Stevens via her blog:  https://4writersandreaders.com

And the final author today with a recent review is Stevie Turner for Finding David.

About Finding David

When Karen and Mick Curtis attend a demonstration of clairvoyance for the first time, Karen is singled out by the medium, Rae Cordelle. Rae has a message from Karen’s son David, who passed over to the spirit world many years before. The message shocks Karen and sends her on a journey of discovery, rocking her previously happy relationship with second husband Mick, David’s stepfather.

One of the recent reviews for the book

Aug 16, 2019 Janet Gogerty rated it Five Stars

People go missing all the time; when a child goes missing it’s every parent’s nightmare and never knowing what happened can perhaps be worse. The author turns the usual missing person story on its head. Would you talk to a psychic, would you trust them? Whether you believe in the paranormal or not, would you take the chance of ignoring a loved one trying to contact you from the other side? We are soon swept along and the reader is not sure who to trust, nor is David’s mother Karen as her marriage is threatened

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07RLZF1JW

And Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07RLZF1JW

A selection of books by Stevie Turner

Read all the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Stevie-Turner/e/B00AV7YOTU

And Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Stevie-Turner/e/B00AV7YOTU

Follow Stevie Turner on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7172051.Stevie_Turner

Connect to Stevie Turner via her website: http://www.stevie-turner-author.co.uk/

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you will be leaving with some books under your arm. Sally