Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #PotLuck – #Elections – Casting a Vote 2016 by Stevie Turner


Welcome to the series  Posts from Your Archives, where bloggers put their trust in me. In this series, I dive into a blogger’s archives and select four posts to share here to my audience.

If you would like to know how it works here is the original post: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/04/28/smorgasbord-posts-from-your-archives-newseries-pot-luck-and-do-you-trust-me/

This is the third post from the archives of author Stevie Turner who has an extensive and eclectic archives and it is easy to get yourself lost in there for an hour or so. I chose this post because this is where our Brexit journey began. As we now attempt to cross the finishing line one way or another, it would seem, I thought it would be interesting to see how it might have turned out differently if everyone had exercised their right to vote. Certainly for women a long and hard fought right.

Elections – Casting a Vote 2016 by Stevie Turner

Vote

The sun was blasting out from behind the rain clouds at last, as I stepped outside earlier to amble down to the village hall and cast my vote in the EU referendum (I’m not going to tell you which way I voted!). Birds were warbling above my head, horses were galloping about in the field opposite, and the cow parsley along the side of the road was now almost as tall as me and waved about in a slight breeze.

As I skirted around larger puddles and breathed in the earthy scent that follows a rainstorm, I thought back to how hard the suffragettes had fought in the early part of the last century for the right of women to vote. Jailed for their militant tactics and also using prison as a means of publicising women’s suffrage, they had undergone hunger strikes in prison resulting in cruel force feeding by prison wardens who had held them down and poured liquid food into the women’s throats via long rubber tubes.

Suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst, founder of the Women’s Social and Political Union, was horrified by the screams of women being force-fed, and in her autobiography she wrote “I shall never while I live, forget the suffering I experienced during the days when those cries were ringing in my ears.” In 1909, fellow suffragette Emily Davison was sentenced to a month’s hard labour in Strangeways Prison in Manchester after throwing rocks at the carriage of chancellor David Lloyd George. She attempted to starve herself, and resisted force-feeding. A prison guard, angered by the fact that Emily had blockaded herself in her cell, forced a hose into the room and nearly filled it with water. The door was subsequently broken down, and she was freed. After suing the wardens of Strangeways, Emily eventually became a martyr for the cause, running out to her death in front of the king’s horse at the 1913 Epsom Derby.

It saddens me considerably when I hear of young women saying that they cannot be bothered to vote. Emmeline and her cohorts must have been writhing in their graves if they had been watching a particular TV programme from on high a couple of nights ago. One woman shrugged her shoulders and said that she wasn’t going to vote because ‘It has nothing to do with me’.

A genial crowd of village folk were standing about chatting at the other end of the village hall, which also doubles as a café and sub- post office on Thursdays. You can cast your vote, buy your stamps, post your parcels, buy a cup of coffee at the same time, and generally have a good old natter about Mr Cameron, Mr Farage et al. I have no idea what the result of the referendum will be, but I do know one thing… if Emmeline Pankhurst was perchance looking over my shoulder in the polling booth she would have been very proud of me!

© Stevie Turner 2016

It would be interesting to hear your views on this….

About Stevie Turner

Stevie Turner works part time as a medical secretary in a busy NHS hospital and writes suspense, women’s fiction, and darkly humorous novels in her spare time. She won a New Apple Book Award in 2014 and a Readers’ Favorite Gold Award in 2015 for her book ‘A House Without Windows’, and one of her short stories, ‘Checking Out’, was published in the Creative Writing Institute’s 2016 anthology ‘Explain!’ Her psychological thriller ‘Repent at Leisure’ won third place in the 2016 Drunken Druid Book Award contest.

Stevie lives in the East of England, and is married with two sons and four grandchildren. She has also branched out into the world of audio books, screenplays, and translations. Most of her novels are now available as audio books, and one screenplay, ‘For the Sake of a Child’, won a silver award in the Spring 2017 Depth of Field International Film Festival. ‘A House Without Windows’ gained the attention of a New York media production company in December 2017.

Some of Stevie’s books are currently being translated into German, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese.

A selection of books by Stevie Turner

A recent reviews for Finding David on Goodreads

D.G. Kaye‘s review Jul 13, 2019  Five Stars.

Stevie Turner’s latest was a great escape read, and by the second page I had to find out what this psychic was going to tell Karen, and then I became absorbed and wanted to just keep reading.

Karen and Mick’s happy life was shaken and stirred after a chance outing to a clairvoyant’s public show where Medium Rae focused her attention on Karen, offering her a message from beyond from Karen’s deceased son – gone missing years before. Rae offers Karen her card, inviting her to contact Rae to learn more if she chose. What mother of a missing child wouldn’t jump at the opportunity to connect with their missing/dead child?

What Rae reveals to Karen sets the tone for the journey to seek out what happened all those years ago when David just a boy then, completely vanished – never to return. The search to find David’s never been found body ensues, and as clues develop and possible suspects for David’s death appear, a great strain weighs between Karen and Mick’s marriage.

Turner always has rich characters who draw us into her stories. I also enjoyed how the story carried through with a tiny crumb given in each chapter, leaving me anxious to turn to the next chapter while still kept wondering – Who the heck killed David – until near the very end. I also enjoyed reading in this genre, which is not a usual one for me. If you enjoy a shorter book with all the meat of a story wrapped up nicely, you will no doubt, enjoy this book!

Read all the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Stevie-Turner/e/B00AV7YOTU

And Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Stevie-Turner/e/B00AV7YOTU

Follow Stevie Turner on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7172051.Stevie_Turner

Connect to Stevie Turner

Website: http://www.stevie-turner-author.co.uk/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StevieTurnerAuthor/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/StevieTurner6
Blog: https://steviet3.wordpress.com/
Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/stevieturner988/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClWFuLQHDqGmOM3KbKJ-Z0g

My thanks to Stevie for allowing me to browse her extensive archives and I am sure you will enjoy them if you head over to explore for yourselves.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Sally’s Book Reviews – A Hundred Tiny Threads by Judith Barrow


 

I have decided that now I have my new reading chair and I am spending time every day for an hour reading in it….. I would start doing my own reviews separate to the Cafe and Bookstore updates.

My first review is for A Hundred Tiny Threads by Judith Barrow which is the fourth book of hers that I have read and enjoyed.

About A Hundred Tiny Threads

It’s 1911 and Winifred Duffy is a determined young woman eager for new experiences, for a life beyond the grocer’s shop counter ruled over by her domineering mother.

The scars of Bill Howarth’s troubled childhood linger. The only light in his life comes from a chance encounter with Winifred, the girl he determines to make his wife.

Meeting her friend Honora’s silver-tongued brother turns Winifred’s heart upside down. But Honora and Conal disappear, after a suffrage rally turns into a riot, and abandoned Winifred has nowhere to turn but home.

The Great War intervenes, sending Bill abroad to be hardened in a furnace of carnage and loss. When he returns his dream is still of Winifred and the life they might have had… Back in Lancashire, worn down by work and the barbed comments of narrow-minded townsfolk, Winifred faces difficult choices in love and life.

My review for A Hundred Tiny Threads.

Highly recommended – A brilliant prequel to the Howarth family saga.  Five Stars.

I read and reviewed the three books in the Howarth Family Saga series and was delighted to discover that Judith Barrow was going to release a prequel to the series. We meet Winifred Duffy and Bill Howarth well into middle-age in the trilogy, and it is wonderful to find out how they began life, and the experiences that formed their characters.

Winifred Duffy finds it difficult to bond with her rigidly unloving mother despite the best efforts of her father. Their grocery shop is a focal point in the street and being under the watchful eye of the neighbours makes their strained relationship worse. It is a time when the Suffragette movement is gathering pace, and much against her mother’s wishes, Winifred becomes involved. Her new friends are vibrant and colourful. They are completely different to anyone that she has known before and they draw her into a dangerous liaison. Winifred has to develop the strength to overcome the consequences of these relationships if she is to continue to live within the narrow minded community around her.

Bill Howarth is a young man whose early life and time in the mines has marred him, leaving scars that make him unpredictable and angry. But Winifred catches his eye and ignites a love that is both powerful and destructive. Bill enlists to fight in the First World War and his experiences of the horror drives any compassion he might have had, deeper beneath his anger. This is reinforced with his service as part of the Black and Tans regiment in Ireland leaving him with few options if he is to find redemption.

Judith Barrow has created two very different characters that cross paths on a number of occasions, sometimes without being aware of each other’s existence. It is very difficult to like Bill Howarth, and it takes a skilled writer to instil some compassion and understanding for the young man he becomes. Winifred is much easier to admire, as she faces and overcomes some life-changing events, and comes to terms with secrets from the past.

The pace of the story is excellent, with several other wonderfully drawn characters such as Honara and her brother Conal, and the completely unlikeable Ethel Duffy. The history of the suffragette movement and the Irish conflict are very well portrayed, forming a compelling backdrop to the story of two young people being drawn into events, often beyond their control.

I recommend that if you have not already read the three books in the trilogy, that you begin with A Hundred Tiny Threads. This will offer you a wonderful introduction to the Howarth family that you will next meet during the Second World War. Also, having become familiar with the locations in this prequel, you will feel immediately at home when you encounter them in the first of the books, Pattern of Shadows.

Head over read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/100-Tiny-Threads-Judith-Barrow-ebook/dp/B073W1LTSR

and at Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/100-Tiny-Threads-Judith-Barrow-ebook/dp/B073W1LTSR

Also by Judith Barrow

Read all the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Judith-Barrow/e/B0043RZJV6

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Judith-Barrow/e/B0043RZJV6

Read more reviews and follow Judith on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3295663.Judith_Barrow

Connect to Judith via her blog: judithbarrowblog.com/

I hope that you will head over and explore Judith’s books .. thanks for dropping in .