Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Posts from Your Archives – #PotLuck – #Recipe – Bishop’s Cake – Lorinda J. Taylor


Welcome to the series  Posts from Your Archives, where bloggers put their trust in me. In this series, I dive into a blogger’s archives and select four posts to share here to my audience.

If you would like to know how it works here is the original post: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/04/28/smorgasbord-posts-from-your-archives-newseries-pot-luck-and-do-you-trust-me/

This is the last post from the archives of fantasy author Lorinda J. Taylor and despite being a little early for a Thanksgiving menu.. I think this cake could be eaten any day of the year.

#Recipe – Bishop’s Cake – Lorinda J. Taylor

A recipe is the last thing you’d expect to find on one of my blogs, but something got me to thinking about eatables I used to make (I never cook or bake these days), and I remembered Bishop’s Cake, and I thought, gee, if I’m never going to make it again, I ought to share this on my blog so other people could enjoy it this holiday season and in the future.

It isn’t a recipe that comes from my grandmother or farther back in family history. In fact, I got it from somebody I worked with in the 1960’s. But then that’s ancient history for a lot of the people reading this! It’s a fruit cake, but don’t let that name put you off!

It’s not the type of fruitcake that you would ever take to the Manitou Springs Fruitcake Toss after Christmas and chuck down the field with a catapult! It’s scrumptious! It has none of the coarse, sour, bitter stuff like candied citrus peel or citron or even candied pineapple. And I don’t know why it’s called Bishop’s Cake — that’s just the name my friend gave it. It’s definitely fit for a bishop, or a king!

Bishop’s Cake

Mix together:

  • 3 eggs, well beaten
  • 1 cup granulated sugar

Add:

  • 2/3 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 2 cups chopped walnuts
  • 1 cup candied cherries (as I recall, I left them whole. You could use red and green mixed for extra color)
  • 1 cup chopped dates (add gradually for even mixing. I used the pre-chopped, sugared date bits because I’m lazy. They are a little drier than the whole dates.)

Combine and sift over this mixture:

  • 1 1/2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  1. Mix well. Add a small amount of water if the batter is too dry to hold togther.
  2. Line a loaf pan (I forget the dimensions — 4×8? 5×9? — just the regular size) with wax paper and spoon the batter into it. I always decorated it with a row of walnut halves down the middle and rows of cherry halves on each side.)
  3. Bake at 325 degrees for 1 1/2 hours. Cool in pan, then lift out with the waxed paper and peel it off the bottom. The cake is compact, so you don’t have to worry about having it fall apart.

Ooh, it’s delicious — my mouth is watering! I mean, what could go wrong with the combination of chocolate chips, cherries, nuts, and dates?

Image Pinterest Francais.

©Lorinda J. Taylor 2012

About Lorinda J. Taylor

A former catalogue librarian with two graduate degrees, Lorinda J. Taylor was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and worked in several different academic libraries before returning to the place of her birth, where she now lives. She has written fantasy and science fiction for years but began to self-publish only in 2011. To this point, she has published fifteen science fiction/fantasy novels, including seven volumes of a series retelling myths in terms of her intelligent termite civilization. Her writings combine many aspects of science fiction, fantasy, literary fiction, future history, off-world adventure, psychological fiction, and even a love story. She always strives to engage readers emotionally and give them something to think about at the end of each book.

A small selection of  books by Lorinda J. Taylor

One of the reviews for part five of the series – Phenix Rises

To ensure I don’t inadvertently add any ‘spoilers’, I have decided to write this review when I am only two thirds of the way through Ms Taylor’s latest ‘block-buster’. Once again, the author has produced a large and satisfying chunk of intergalactic travel, spiced with inter-related struggles between the friends and colleagues of Captain Robbie. I have read all of the series and this time the ‘atmosphere’ has mellowed, so (I hope and suspect) all will be nicely resolved by the end of the book. Such empathy from the writer with her characters, can only have been created by ‘living’ the story (in her imagination) through them. I am still not overly fond of ‘our hero’ but his friends are a wonderfully rich mixture of interesting and varied personalities which keep me coming back for more. The author must be a keen observer of human nature to have included so many different guises so seamlessly within the narrative. Another tour-de-‘force – which I hope will be with her’, for many more stories to come.

Read all the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Lorinda-J-Taylor/e/B007AKHZW4

and on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lorinda-J.-Taylor/e/B007AKHZW4

Read more reviews and follow Lorinda on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5429943.Lorinda_J_Taylor

Connect to Lorinda

Blog: http://termitewriter.blogspot.ie/
Blog 2: http://termitespeaker.blogspot.com/
MeWe: Lorinda J. Taylor
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TermiteWriter

My thanks to Lorinda for allowing me to share posts from her archives and I hope you will head over and enjoy exploring yourselves. thanks Sally

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #PotLuck – Reminiscences about Old Libraries from an Old Librarian, Part 1 by Lorinda J. Taylor


Welcome to the series  Posts from Your Archives, where bloggers put their trust in me. In this series, I dive into a blogger’s archives and select four posts to share here to my audience.

If you would like to know how it works here is the original post: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/04/28/smorgasbord-posts-from-your-archives-newseries-pot-luck-and-do-you-trust-me/

This is the third post from the archives of fantasy author Lorinda J. Taylor who has two blogs for me to choose from. In this post I share some of the libraries that Lorinda values…The original Coburn Library became the Tutt Library in 1962.

Reminiscences about Old Libraries from an Old Librarian, Part 1 by Lorinda J. Taylor

I have worked in really old libraries and in brand new libraries and in some of a middle age, and while the new ones were more roomy and convenient, it’s the old ones that I have the fondest memories of, and also some of the weirdest. All libraries have their eccentricities, but the old ones are like pixillated little old ladies and gentlemen. You never know what they will do next.

The first library I ever worked in (and the one where I studied as an undergraduate) was the one below. I attended Colorado College from 1957 through 1961 and during that time I worked as a student assistant for the summer after my sophomore year (the summer after my junior year I took beginning German and I never tried to work and go to school at the same time — I’ve never been a multitasker). Then I worked again as a circulation assistant the summer after I graduated, before I went to Cornell to study for my MA. In 1962 CC’s brand spanking new Charles Leaming Tutt Library opened and I worked there that same summer (starting only a few weeks after the building opened — they were still laying carpet) before I headed to UCLA for my library science degree. I was to return ito the new library in 1963 as Catalog Librarian, but that’s a whole different story.

Tutt Library, Colorado College, 1894-1962
A Postcard View
From https://libraryweb.coloradocollege.edu/library/specialcollections/Colorado/EarlyViews/F10.html

More information can be found: https://www.coloradocollege.edu/library/about/index.html

The building was constructed of “peachblow sandstone quarried near Aspen.” It’s a beautiful red stone and several of the early buildings on the campus were constructed of that material. “Coburn cost about $45,000 to build. The major donor was the Hon. N. P. Coburn of Newton Massachusetts, a childhood friend of CC President Slocum. In 1940, to make room for the growing collection, a four-story addition with room for 60,000 volumes was built for $20,000.”

Interior View of Tutt Library, ca. 1895

“The building, judged inadequate even after the addition, was razed in 1963. The statue of Winged Victory of Samothrace, seen here in an interior view ca. 1895, disappeared around that time. We hold out hope that it will come back home to roost one day.”

This interior view may be from 1895, but when I was in college, it looked exactly like this, except the addition at the back had done away with that half-moon window. Everything was decked out in beautiful warm-hued, polished woodwork. The rare book collection was housed in a locked closet in the upper left hand of the picture, reached by a metal circular staircase. Nike was still there in my time — when I was pondering my reading at a table, I used to look up at that statue in some fascination. The circulation desk was always over there at the left, and I presume the small card catalog seen at the left in the picture included all the books the library contained in 1895. By my time the library had maybe 100,000 books (I honestly have forgotten, so I don’t swear by this figure) crammed into that small space.
You see those balconies at the upper right? By my time bound periodicals were shelved there, and sometimes a little old lady would ask you so sweetly to get a volume down for her.

What can a student assistant do but comply? You had to climb up a really tall ladder while dangling halfway out over the edge of the balcony. Honestly, it was scary!

Not seen in this picture (which looks north) is the balcony at the southern end of the main room. It housed the materials in the historical ranges of the Dewey Decimal system and it seems like I was always stuck with shelving books there. Of course there were no elevators.

You had to load up a tray of books (you know how heavy books are) and carry them up a steep, cut-back staircase, and then keep going up and down a ladder with a few books each time. Maybe that’s why I have so much arthritis in my shoulders now! I’ve hauled books around all my life!

The 1940 addition was bare-bones — just metal stacks in about four levels — but at least the ceilings were low and it was supplied with carrels with slit windows, so you could look out over the quadrangle when you were studying.

Do any of you remember the smell of old libraries? New libraries smell like fresh paint and plaster and carpet chemicals, but old libraries smell like musty, unsunned storage caves — paper dust and old crumbling leather bindings and book glue and a touch of printing ink and furniture polish and maybe some disintegrated bookworms thrown in for good measure. A wonderful, nostalgic smell that I can still conjure up for myself!

Now, the spookiest and most aromatic part of Coburn Library was the basement. It contained storage for government documents. I presume you all know that many libraries are repositories for government documents; they automatically receive at least a selection of everything printed by the GPO. You know how much paper the government produces. Any academic library worth its salt has a librarian solely in charge of government documents, and those materials take up a heck of a lot of space. In Coburn it was the basement. It was lit only by drop lights and they didn’t stay on all the time. There were no centralized switches for the lighting, so in the evening when the library closed up, somebody had to sweep the building, turning off the lights. If somebody requested a document in the daytime, you would have to go down there and find it for them, turning the lights on as you went. Some of the aisles were piled with overflow from those sections of shelving.

There is a cartoon that I think came from the New Yorker, but I’m not sure. I’ve been trying to find it online but without any luck, alas, so I’ll describe it. It shows a female librarian between two stacks with a bunch of books piled on the floor just like I used to see in the Coburn basement. Sitting on top of the books (with a drop light overhead) is a skull draped with cobwebs and the woman is regarding it with the most horrified expression. I used to feel just like that when I had to go down there. It wouldn’t have surprised me at all to find a mummified body! Murder in the Library! I think that’s been done in more than one mystery novel!

It pained me that they demolished this quirky old building. I would have liked to see it preserved and put it on the Register of Historic Buildings. But the college needed the land for a new administration building and auditorium, so … Coburn is gone never to return.

And by the way, if anybody out there knows the location of that Winged Victory, please get in touch with me!
 

About Lorinda J. Taylor

A former catalogue librarian with two graduate degrees, Lorinda J. Taylor was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and worked in several different academic libraries before returning to the place of her birth, where she now lives. She has written fantasy and science fiction for years but began to self-publish only in 2011. To this point, she has published fifteen science fiction/fantasy novels, including seven volumes of a series retelling myths in terms of her intelligent termite civilization. Her writings combine many aspects of science fiction, fantasy, literary fiction, future history, off-world adventure, psychological fiction, and even a love story. She always strives to engage readers emotionally and give them something to think about at the end of each book.

A small selection of  books by Lorinda J. Taylor

One of the reviews for part five of the series – Phenix Rises

To ensure I don’t inadvertently add any ‘spoilers’, I have decided to write this review when I am only two thirds of the way through Ms Taylor’s latest ‘block-buster’. Once again, the author has produced a large and satisfying chunk of intergalactic travel, spiced with inter-related struggles between the friends and colleagues of Captain Robbie. I have read all of the series and this time the ‘atmosphere’ has mellowed, so (I hope and suspect) all will be nicely resolved by the end of the book. Such empathy from the writer with her characters, can only have been created by ‘living’ the story (in her imagination) through them. I am still not overly fond of ‘our hero’ but his friends are a wonderfully rich mixture of interesting and varied personalities which keep me coming back for more. The author must be a keen observer of human nature to have included so many different guises so seamlessly within the narrative. Another tour-de-‘force – which I hope will be with her’, for many more stories to come.

Read all the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Lorinda-J-Taylor/e/B007AKHZW4

and on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lorinda-J.-Taylor/e/B007AKHZW4

Read more reviews and follow Lorinda on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5429943.Lorinda_J_Taylor

Connect to Lorinda

Blog: http://termitewriter.blogspot.ie/
Blog 2: http://termitespeaker.blogspot.com/
MeWe: Lorinda J. Taylor
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TermiteWriter

My thanks to Lorinda for allowing me to share posts from her archives and I hope you will head over and enjoy exploring yourselves. thanks Sally

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #PotLuck – Ye Olde #Grammarian (No. 6): A Hodgepodge, Plus Some E-Book #Formatting Tips from Lorinda J. Taylor


Welcome to the series  Posts from Your Archives, where bloggers put their trust in me. In this series, I dive into a blogger’s archives and select four posts to share here to my audience.

If you would like to know how it works here is the original post: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/04/28/smorgasbord-posts-from-your-archives-newseries-pot-luck-and-do-you-trust-me/

This is the second post from the archives of fantasy author Lorinda J. Taylor who has two blogs for me to choose from.

Ye Olde Grammarian (No. 6): A Hodgepodge, Plus Some E-Book Formatting Tips from Lorinda J. Taylor

Otherwise known as a potpourri, pastiche, melange, mishmash, or gallimaufry!

https://www.copyediting.com/

I recently read somewhere about certain conventions of print books that I realized I had been flagrantly violating. (I checked a bunch of books that I own and by golly, both these things are true.)

First, don’t use “by” on the cover and title page. Unfortunately, I have done that consistently, until the last two books in the Ki’shto’ba series, where I dropped the “by” on the cover. I did, however, retain it on the title page, again for the sake of consistency.

The other convention is that the first paragraph of a chapter or chapter section is not indented. Sometimes they even use a few letters in all caps. After I learned this, I tried not indenting, but it just didn’t look right to me, so again for the sake of consistency I persisted in indenting the first paragraph.

So I make my mea culpas. In my next publication, I may amend my ways. In the meantime, if it really bothers you that I use “by” on the cover and t.p. or that I indent the opening paragraphs, I guess you just can’t read my books, or you can read the e-books, where clarity is the only rule that really applies.

I am very much aware that a writer should italicize the names of ships. I didn’t do that in v. 5 and 6 of The Labors of Ki’shto’ba Huge-Head. Somehow I thought it seemed artificial. I think the Shshi consider their ships as something more than inanimate objects, so, since one does not italicize the names of individuals, it seemed wrong not to treat ships the same way. You’ll notice that I did italicize the name of the human ship in v. 6. And that’s saying more than I should.

So I don’t want to hear any complaints that I don’t know that rule!

Now I want to talk about backward apostrophes. In Word, most people use curly apostrophes and when you type a single apostrophe, it comes out like this: He said, ‘I see you.’ An initial single apostrophe always opens to the right, which is correct for a quotation mark. But when the apostrophe signifies an omission, it shouldn’t open to the right — it should open to the left. Wrong: Eat ‘em up! It should be Eat ’em up! So how did I make it go the right way? I type this: Eat ‘’em up! and then go back and delete the first apostrophe. I get irked every time I read a book formatted by somebody who doesn’t know you can do this.

So what’s with the word or words “alright” and “all right”? Here is the Usage Note under “alright” in Dictionary.com:

“The form alright as a one-word spelling of the phrase all right in all of its senses probably arose by analogy with such words as already and altogether. Although alright is a common spelling in written dialogue and in other types of informal writing, all right is used in more formal, edited writing.”

It may be becoming common to spell it “alright,” but it still irks me when I encounter it in an otherwise well-edited book.

I have always had problems knowing whether to use “a while” or “awhile.” Read what Grammar Girl has to say about it — it’s basically what I finally came up with on my own.

“Awhile” is an adverb. “I stayed awhile.” “He stared at the girl awhile and then approached her.”

“A while” is simply an article plus a noun, and that construction is required when an object is involved, for example, in prepositional phrases: “I stayed for a while.” “He left after a while.” Grammar Girl gives this example, which may confuse some people. “It’s been a while since he visited.”

The reason you use the noun form here is that “to be” in a copular, or linking, verb and takes a predicate nominative or a predicate adjective rather than an adverb. (You wouldn’t say, “He’s been quietly for a while,’ would you? You would say, “He’s been quiet for a while.” “Quiet” is an adjective modifying “he.”) Esoteric, you say? You should have heard my mother expounding on linking verbs! Some other linking verbs are “to become,” “to feel ,” to smell,” etc. If you’re interested in pursuing this further, go here.

I’m going to reiterate what I said in an earlier post about using commas in terms of address.

It’s the old “Let’s eat, Grampa” vs. “Let’s eat Grampa” dichotomy. In my earlier post I said this: “The use of the vocative (i.e., an instance where you are addressing someone) is related to this. … Here is another [example] as to why you should set off the name of the person addressed with a comma:

What don’t you want to tell John?

What don’t you want to tell, John?

I recently read a book where the language got really confused because of the omission of commas. I was always having to stop and go back and figure out what the author meant. I think it’s a British tendency to omit commas in this sort of construction, but I do wish people would return to the old rule.

To read my other Olde Grammarian posts, go to
http://termitewriter.blogspot.com/search/label/Grammar

Summary of how to do ToC links on Smashwords

Now I’m going to add a bit on e-book formatting using Word — how to easily create a linked Table of Contents. Smashwords insists that you do this, but Kindle doesn’t care. I get irritated when an e-book doesn’t have a ToC linked to the chapters and also chapters linked back to the ToC, because it’s so easy to lose your place in an e-book and this way you can always skip through by chapter. I recommend that everybody do this on all their e-books. It takes a little time, but it’s not difficult and your readers (or at least I) will thank you.

Make your Table of Contents (remove all links based on style, e.g., Heading 1 or ToC1, etc.)
Select each chapter heading in the text and create Insert Bookmark (on Insert menu).

Remember, no spaces in bookmark names; abbreviate as much as you like as long as it’s clear (e.g., Ch1 for Chapter One or Note for Note to the Smashwords Edition).

Go to ToC list and select each Chapter designation. Then add a Hyperlink, using the Insert menu or the right-click menu. Click on “Place in this document.” Select the corresponding bookmark and then click on OK.

Then make a bookmark for the heading “Table of Contents.” Smashwords suggests using “ref_ToC”

Go one more time through the document text, selecting each chapter heading and making a hyperlink using “ref_ToC.” This will link each chapter back to the top of the Table of Contents.
Double check to make sure the ToC entries link to the correct chapters.

©Lorinda J. Taylor

My thanks to Lorinda for clearing up some common grammar issues and a tip on making sure your ebook has a Table of Contents.

About Lorinda J. Taylor

A former catalogue librarian with two graduate degrees, Lorinda J. Taylor was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and worked in several different academic libraries before returning to the place of her birth, where she now lives. She has written fantasy and science fiction for years but began to self-publish only in 2011. To this point, she has published fifteen science fiction/fantasy novels, including seven volumes of a series retelling myths in terms of her intelligent termite civilization. Her writings combine many aspects of science fiction, fantasy, literary fiction, future history, off-world adventure, psychological fiction, and even a love story. She always strives to engage readers emotionally and give them something to think about at the end of each book.

A small selection of  books by Lorinda J. Taylor

One of the reviews for part five of the series – Phenix Rises

To ensure I don’t inadvertently add any ‘spoilers’, I have decided to write this review when I am only two thirds of the way through Ms Taylor’s latest ‘block-buster’. Once again, the author has produced a large and satisfying chunk of intergalactic travel, spiced with inter-related struggles between the friends and colleagues of Captain Robbie. I have read all of the series and this time the ‘atmosphere’ has mellowed, so (I hope and suspect) all will be nicely resolved by the end of the book. Such empathy from the writer with her characters, can only have been created by ‘living’ the story (in her imagination) through them. I am still not overly fond of ‘our hero’ but his friends are a wonderfully rich mixture of interesting and varied personalities which keep me coming back for more. The author must be a keen observer of human nature to have included so many different guises so seamlessly within the narrative. Another tour-de-‘force – which I hope will be with her’, for many more stories to come.

Read all the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Lorinda-J-Taylor/e/B007AKHZW4

and on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lorinda-J.-Taylor/e/B007AKHZW4

Read more reviews and follow Lorinda on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5429943.Lorinda_J_Taylor

Connect to Lorinda

Blog: http://termitewriter.blogspot.ie/
Blog 2: http://termitespeaker.blogspot.com/
MeWe: Lorinda J. Taylor
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TermiteWriter

My thanks to Lorinda for allowing me to share posts from her archives and I hope you will head over and enjoy exploring yourselves. thanks Sally

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New Book on the Shelves – The Man Who Found Birds among the Stars, Part Five: Phenix Rises: A Biographical Fiction by Lorinda J. Taylor


A brand new release by Lorinda J. Taylor –The Man Who Found Birds among the Stars, Part Five: Phenix Rises: A Biographical Fiction.

About the book

A rehabilitated Robbin Nikalishin is back in the Captain’s chair as the Phenix Project for Interstellar Flight gets underway. After finishing off the loose ends remaining from his unorthodox penalty, the Captain returns to Herinen Space Port, where the first tasks are to complete the construction of two starships, give them names, and select a crew to fly them, including certain participants from the previous interstellar program. The Captain is fully committed to supporting his old friends, even though not all of them have fully recovered from the Darter Disaster. Specifically, Ian Glencrosse remains deeply – and ominously – affected, while Banyat Thaksin, the Engineer who lost his foot in the disaster, embarks on a course that will influence the future history of Earth.Capt. Robbie never loses his sense of humor or his willingness to engage in romantic relationships, finding a comfortable liaison with a earlier acquaintance. However, his disastrous marriage has not been severed. Can it be that the High Feather will resurface, with a new agenda of her own?

Head over and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1795285648

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1795285648

A small selection of other books by Lorinda J. Taylor

One of the reviews for part four of the series – Survivor

Captain Robbin Nikalishin’s world has imploded around him leaving him to deal with the consequences of his many bad decisions. He embarks upon the search for the meaning of life that will set him free.

Robbie’s relationship with his wife has deteriorated to the point of no return. Problems with women have always plagued him. Most of these feelings stem from his inability to understand his mother and the choices she made long ago when he was a boy. This shortcoming has stunted his emotional growth acting as the catalyst that throws him into a deep depression, coloring his decision-making capabilities.

In a downward spiral, Robbie plunges into the depths of self-loathing. He turns to alcohol, seeking sanctuary from the personal revelations that haunt his psyche. Reckless, he pushes his luck and almost ends his career.

Yet, behind the scenes, his friends are working to help him regain his confidence. It is through their guidance and love that Captain Nikalshin finds the man he once was.

I have thoroughly enjoyed this series. The author has created an in-depth character study of the protagonist, Captain Robbie with stunning results. Seldom in fiction do you get to know the deepest secrets of a man and why he makes the choices he does.

With that said, be prepared, because Survivor is long, maybe a bit too long. I have followed this series since its inception and always felt a motherly connection to the captain. Nevertheless, there were a few episodes where he devolved into a sniveling mess where I wanted to slap him or give him a firm talking to!

Somehow, I always find my way to back to falling for Robbie Nikalishin’s naivete and charm. You simply can’t be mad at the character for long, which demonstrates the writing talent of the author.

I’m looking forward to the fifth book. I hope the captain finds everything he’s been searching for.

MY RATING: Character Believability: 4 Flow and Pace: 5 Reader Engagement: 4
Reader Enrichment: 5 Reader Enjoyment: 5 Overall Rate: 4 out of 5 Stars

Read all the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Lorinda-J-Taylor/e/B007AKHZW4

and on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lorinda-J.-Taylor/e/B007AKHZW4

Read more reviews and follow Lorinda on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5429943.Lorinda_J_Taylor

About Lorinda J. Taylor

A former catalogue librarian with two graduate degrees, Lorinda J. Taylor was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and worked in several different academic libraries before returning to the place of her birth, where she now lives. She has written fantasy and science fiction for years but began to self-publish only in 2011. To this point, she has published fifteen science fiction/fantasy novels, including seven volumes of a series retelling myths in terms of her intelligent termite civilization. Her writings combine many aspects of science fiction, fantasy, literary fiction, future history, off-world adventure, psychological fiction, and even a love story. She always strives to engage readers emotionally and give them something to think about at the end of each book.

Connect to Lorinda

Blog: http://termitewriter.blogspot.ie/
MeWe: Lorinda J. Taylor
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TermiteWriter

It would be great if you could share the news of Lorinda’s new book – Thanks Sally.