Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Guest Writer – Robbie Cheadle – The York Chocolate Series Part Four – Chocolate in wartime First World War 1914 – 1918 –


It has been so interesting and informative to find out about The York Chocolate story and the treat everyone enjoys. Author Robbie Cheadle has been sharing  The York Chocolate story with us, following her recent trip to the UK..  You can find part three HERE

The York Chocolate Series Part Four – Chocolate in wartime First World War 1914 – 1918

At the start of the Great War, the city of York sent a gift of a tin of Rowntree’s chocolate to all of its residents serving in the forces. Each tin contained a solid block of Rowntree’s chocolate wrapped in paper. The tin was made of pressed steel and had a hinged lid. It was also printed with a design incorporating the flags of the Allied nations and had an inscription which read as follows:

The Lord Mayor of York, John Bowes Morrell and the Sheriff, Oscar F. Rowntree, send best wishes for a Happy Christmas and a bright New Year to all York men who are serving their King and Country. Christmas 1914.

The purpose of the gift was to give the soldiers a taste of home while they spent Christmas far away from their family and friends. The gift also included postcards, pencils and similarly practical gifts and was intended as a moral boaster as many people had expected the war to be over by Christmas 2014.

The gift was organised by the Lord Mayor, John Bowes Morrell and the Sherriff of York, Liberal politician Oscar Rowntree, a member of the family behind the Rowntree & Co chocolate factory. The gift was greatly appreciated by the York servicemen and over 250 “chocolate” thank you letters were written to the organisers.

During the Great War, Rowntree’s turned its large dining hall into a makeshift hospital with enough room for over two hundred injured servicemen. The Rowntree’s also set up the Friends Ambulance Unit which was used to assist the injured and also to deliver medical supplies. This service provided other pacifists with an alternative from serving in the forces.

Following the gift to York servicemen for Christmas 1914, there was a larger national campaign whereby the families of personnel serving in the war collected cocoa coupons in order to send tins of chocolate to their men fighting abroad. The campaign was so popular, that for Christmas 1915, every member of the military abroad received one of the King George Chocolate Tins.

During June 2018, a 103 year old tin, containing nine bars of chocolate of the original ten, was found among a collection of items belonging to Leicestershire Regiment soldier Richard Bullimore.

Troops serving in France during the first Christmas of the war were given the Colonies Gift Tins, made in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire.

©Robbie Cheadle 2019

One of the reviews for the book

Sir Chocolate is “round and fat” and his wife Lady Sweet is described as wearing ” a stripy skirt and top.” They live in Chocolate land, where they “sell confectionery in a shop.” Their story is told in verse, as they search for “the amazing bean with flavours of strawberries.”
Robbie and her son Michael Cheadle have created a children’s book that is a delight to read, and beautifully illustrated with Robbie’s exquisite baking and fondant creations. Both children and adults will love this book.

The recipes at the end include Jolly Gingerbread Boys and Sir Chocolate Brownies.
The illustrations will compel the readers to bake…

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MCRJYG

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01MCRJYG4/

A selection of other Sir Chocolate stories co-written with Michael Cheadle and other books by Robbie Cheadle

Read all the reviews and buy the books:https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

Read more reviews and follow Robbie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle

About Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with five published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

I have been drawn to the horror and supernatural genres of books all my life. At the age of ten years old I embarked on reading Stephen King’s books including The Shining and Salem’s Lot. These books scared me so much I had to put them aside by 6P.M. in the evening in order to get a good night’s sleep but they also fascinated me. I subsequently worked my way through all of Stephen King’s earlier books as well as those of Dean R. Koontz.

I have read a large number of classics, in particular, I enjoy Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Charles Dickens and the works of the Bronte sisters.

I am hugely interested in the history of the United Kingdom as well as the mythology and tales of the paranormal that are abundant on this intriguing European island.

Connect to Robbie Cheadle

Website/Blog Roberta Writes: https://robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com/
Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/
Website: https://www.robbiecheadle.co.za:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SirChocolateBooks/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bakeandwrite

My thanks to Robbie for sharing this series with us and please join us again next Monday for Part Five of York’s Chocolate Story..

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Guest Writer – Robbie Cheadle – The York Chocolate Series – Part Three – Chocolate in wartime Second Anglo Boer War 1899 – 1902-


Delighted that over the next three weeks, author Robbie Cheadle will be sharing the rest of  The York Chocolate story with us, following her recent trip to the UK.. And I will be featuring a different Sir Chocolate Story and Cookbook each week. You can find part two HERE

The York Chocolate Series – Part Three – Chocolate in wartime Second Anglo Boer War 1899 – 1902

In 1899, war broke out for the second time between the British Empire and the two Boer Republics in South Africa. In advance of Christmas 1899, Queen Victoria asked Cadbury, which held a Royal Warrant as suppliers of cocoa and chocolate products, to produce tins of chocolate to send to the British men fighting in South Africa as a gift. This would be the first time during a British war that chocolate, a great comfort food and an excellent source of energy, would be sent to soldiers in large quantities.

This request posed an ethical conundrum for George and Richard Cadbury who were Quakers and pacifists and opposed the war. They did not want to appear to be profiting from a conflict situation, but they did not want to say no to the Queen.

The Cadbury’s formed a temporary alliance with their rivals, Fry’s and Rountree’s, who were also Quakers, whereby they agreed to produce the chocolate in special unbranded tins and donate them free of charge to the war effort. Queen Victoria was not happy with the lack of branding as she wanted the soldiers to know that she was sending them the finest quality British chocolate. It was then agreed that the chocolate itself would be branded but the tins would not.

The above photograph is from an article in the Express on-line news website and features one of these chocolate bars that was found intact. The article is from June 2018 and you can read the full article here: https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/984377/Queen-Victoria-chocolate-bar-british-soldiers-Boer-War-sale-auction-south-africa

The chocolate tin containing Queen Victoria’s chocolate gift was ornate. This is a photograph of it from York360.co.uk:

The Second Anglo Boer War degenerated into guerrilla warfare when the Burghers [citizens of the two Boer Republics] refused to accept defeat after the British Empire annexed the two Boer states.

The Burghers implemented a plan to use hit and run guerrilla tactics to cause as much damage as possible to the British administration with great success and the war dragged on, causing the British administration, under Lord Kitchener, to respond with their controversial scorched earth policy. This policy was a military strategy aimed at destroying anything which might be useful to the Boer commandos in the bushveld and devastating the rural population which supported them. The Boer farms were burned to the ground, the livestock killed and the crops burned and the wives and children living on the farms were interned in concentration camps.

A ghost and his gold

I am finalising a novella about the Second Anglo Boer War, told from the perspective on one Afrikaaner family called A ghost and his gold.

This is a short extract from my current WIP:

“Mrs van Tonder, her snow white hair and deeply lined face defying her indefatigable spirit and faith in God, helped Marta to obtain a couple of extra British military blankets from the supplies tent to supplement the blankets they had brought with them. The blankets were old and thin and the two women and four children, as well as Ardrina and Dorthea, would have to share them but her success in wrangling them from the camp staff, with the help of Mrs van Tonder, felt like a small victory to Marta.

Mrs van Tonder, or Ouma* Lettie, was seventy five years old and had been living in a women’s laager@ before it was attacked by the Khakis. “I was with my husband, who was one of twenty men, too old to undertake military duty, who had been appointed to protect the women and children.

“We were travelling with thirty wagons and carts and two hundred cattle and had been living on the veld for seven months before the attack that landed me here. Various Boer commandos had been providing us with weapons, tents, food and clothing.

“About a month ago, a convoy of Khakis# came across our laager and attacked it. They burned all the wagons, food and tents and we were forced to watch.”

A distant look came into the older woman’s eyes as she remembered that day. The soldiers had set fire to the wagons first. The yellow and orange flames had fanned out delicately, tasting the dry tinder of the frames. Bright sparks flew upwards, fanned by puffs of the bitter wind, and settled on the canvas wagon covers which instantly burst into flames. As the wagons and tents burned, black smoke billowed upwards, rising upwards to a tremendous height where it was whipped to shreds by the wind.

“What happened next?” asked Marta, forcing Mrs van Tonder to return her wandering mind to the present time. “When they destruction was complete, they marched our elderly guards and the few boys of twelve years and older away as prisoners of war. The women and the rest of the children were brought here.”

“Were you scared?” Marta asked.

“No,” Mrs van Tonder’s lips formed a thin, straight line and she pushed back her shoulders as if in defiance. “The Lord has always preserved me until now and He will continue to do so.””

* – Grandmother in Afrikaans
@ – ox wagons in a circle formation
# – name used by the Boer’s for the British soldiers in the Second Anglo Boer War

©Robbie Cheadle 2019

If you are visiting York then you cannot miss a visit to museum: https://www.yorkschocolatestory.com/

Robbie and her son Michael put chocolate to excellent use in their Sir Chocolate Series including in Sir Chocolate and the Fondant Five Story and Cookbook.

About the book

Number 6 in the Sir Chocolate series: Five zoo animals go missing and Sir Chocolate needs to find them. Includes five lovely new recipes.

One of the reviews for the book

Miriam Hurdle 5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful book to read with engaging parent-children activity May 27, 2019

Robbie Cheadle and her son Michael, in the delightful book Sir Chocolate and the Fondant Five Story and Cookbook, combine children’s story, poetry and recipes together. The story is about a zoo in Chocolate Land with Fondant Five, namely the lion, king of the jungle, the gentle elephant, the elegant leopard, the bulky rhino, and the buffalo. Sir Chocolate cares for them. One day, these five fondant animals disappeared. Sir Chocolate found Fondant Cat who could help to find Fondant Five.

This fun story book includes recipes for Lady Sweet Rusks, Buffalo Coconut Cake, Rhino Soetkoekies, Cheetah Cheese Scones, and Sir Chocolate Peppermint Caramel Pudding.

The book has beautiful photograph of the fondant animals and desserts. Students in the classrooms will enjoy the story, poems and photos in this book. I will read this to my granddaughter. I also love the idea of parents doing the cooking with their children using these recipes.

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07PVKZ851

 

A selection of other Sir Chocolate stories co-written with Michael Cheadle and other books by Robbie Cheadle

Read all the reviews and buy the books:https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

Read more reviews and follow Robbie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle

About Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with five published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

I have been drawn to the horror and supernatural genres of books all my life. At the age of ten years old I embarked on reading Stephen King’s books including The Shining and Salem’s Lot. These books scared me so much I had to put them aside by 6P.M. in the evening in order to get a good night’s sleep but they also fascinated me. I subsequently worked my way through all of Stephen King’s earlier books as well as those of Dean R. Koontz.

I have read a large number of classics, in particular, I enjoy Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Charles Dickens and the works of the Bronte sisters.

I am hugely interested in the history of the United Kingdom as well as the mythology and tales of the paranormal that are abundant on this intriguing European island.

Connect to Robbie Cheadle

Website/Blog Roberta Writes: https://robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com/
Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/
Website: https://www.robbiecheadle.co.za:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SirChocolateBooks/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bakeandwrite

My thanks to Robbie for sharing this series with us and please join us again next Monday for Part Four of York’s Chocolate Story..

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Guest Writer – Robbie Cheadle – The York Chocolate Story – Part Two – Terry’s of York and Craven’s


Delighted that over the next four weeks, author Robbie Cheadle will be sharing the The York Chocolate story with us, following her recent trip to the UK.. And I will be featuring a different Sir Chocolate Story and Cookbook each week. You can find part one HERE

The York Chocolate Story – Part Two – Terry’s of York and Craven’s

I know Terry’s due to is famous Chocolate Orange product. I had no idea that Terry’s products came from York and I also didn’t know that Craven’s humbugs are also a creation of this city.
Terry’s of York

Joseph Terry came from a farming background and trained for several years as an apothecary before opening his own shop in Walmgate. In 1823, he married Harriet Atkinson, a relative of Robert Berry, who owned a confectionery business in St Helen’s Square, and made a decision to give up his Walmgate operation and join the Berry business. Shortly afterwards, Robert Berry died and his son, George, joined with Joseph in a business named Terry & Berry. George decided to leave the business in 1828 and Joseph carried on alone, renaming the business Joseph Terry and Company.

Joseph built a reputation for cakes and comfits, sugared sweets, candied peel, marmalade and medicated lozenges. He started using the railways to send small quantities of his products to towns all over the North of England, into the Midlands and down to Luton and London.

By the time Joseph died in 1850, the Terry name was becoming known around Britain. His son, Joseph junior, built on the foundations of the company and turned it into a major concern. Joseph Jnr moved most of the production to a factory on the banks of the River Ouse at Clementhorpe.

In 1926, the Chocolate Works factory, next to York Racecourse, was opened to house all of Terry’s production in York. It was in this factory that some of Terry’s most famous brands came into existence, including All Gold in 1930 and the Chocolate Orange in 1931.

In 1993, Kraft acquired Terry’s and on 30 September 2005 the York factory was closed with production moving to other plants of Europe.

Chocolate Orange Christmas pudding

Below is a picture of a chocolate Christmas pudding I made using a Terry’s Chocolate Orange as the centre (I also made one using a giant gobstopper as the centre) and then covered with chocolate covered biscuit balls, cut in half, and attached using Royal icing. I then covered the ball with melted white chocolate and attached the fondant holly leaves and red berries.

The Craven family

Mary Ann Craven (nee Hick) was born on 15 September 1826, the daughter of Joseph Hick who, together with a partner, had set up a confectionery business called Kilner & Hick confectioners.

Mary Ann married another confectioner by the name of Thomas Craven resulting in two of the families which had gradually been building up the confectionery business in York over the past 50 years being united.

Thomas Craven had been an apprentice to Berry & Hide, a confectionery owned by George Berry, the previous partner of Joseph Terry, and his brother-in-law, Thomas Hide. After seven years as an apprentice, Thomas Craven bought the right to trade in York when he became a Freeman in 1940.

Mary Ann’s father died on 20 February 1860, followed two years later by her husband, Thomas. Mary Ann was left a widow with three small children to bring up on her own. She managed to do this while running the two businesses which she combined and ran as one until her death in 1900.

In 1881, Mary Ann’s son, Joseph, had become a partner in the firm which became known as M.A. Craven & Son. The firm earned a reputation for the quality of its toffees and humbugs and other sugar confectionery which were produced at their main factory at their Coppergate site.

In 1904, Joseph bought the recipe for French almonds during a trip to Paris and these proved to be a great money spinner for Craven’s.

In 1966, Craven’s moved its factory to the outskirts of York. The Coppergate site was eventually excavated, revealing evidence of Viking occupation and leading to the opening of the Jorvik Viking Centre on that site in 1984.

By the 1980s, Craven’s was producing approximately 5 000 tonnes of confectionery a year. The most popular of its products included French Almonds, Humbugs and Mary Ann Creamy Toffees.

Craven’s was eventually bought out by Tangerine Confectionery where its brands joined the ranks with other classics such as the Sherbet Fountain and Wham Bar.

If you are visiting York then you cannot miss a visit to museum: https://www.yorkschocolatestory.com/

Sir Chocolate and the Baby Cookie Monster story and cookbook

About the book

Sir Chocolate and Lady Sweet find a lost baby cookie monster. Join them on an adventure to return the baby to its mother and learn how to make some of their delicious recipes at the same time.

A five star review for the book by Colin Garrow

Book 2 of Robbie Cheadle’s Sir Chocolate series features Sir Chocolate and Lady Sweet in a hunt to find a lost baby cookie monster. As well as the story, we learn how to make a selection of delicious recipes, including Easy Sausage Rolls and Chocolate Butter Icing.

I bought the paperback version of this charming children’s book mainly because the Kindle format of picture books rarely reproduce the images satisfactorily (though to be fair I didn’t look at the ebook version, so can’t say for sure). The story is in rhyme and tells of the search for the missing Baby Cookie Monster, including a trip in a chocolate cake car and characters such as the Vanilla Fudge Bird.

The pictures of all the edible characters show up well and compliment the story. The recipes too, are delightful and are laid out in a way that makes them easy to understand for young kids.

Robbie Cheadle started writing these books when her son Michael came up with ideas for the characters. Robbie’s website is a great resource for cooks and kids, as it includes videos of some of her other recipes as well as tutorials on fondant art and mouth-watering images of the World of Sir Chocolate. Too yummy indeed!

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N2T89RS

And Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01N2T89RS

A selection of other Sir Chocolate stories co-written with Michael Cheadle and other books by Robbie Cheadle

Read all the reviews and buy the books:https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

Read more reviews and follow Robbie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle

About Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with five published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

I have been drawn to the horror and supernatural genres of books all my life. At the age of ten years old I embarked on reading Stephen King’s books including The Shining and Salem’s Lot. These books scared me so much I had to put them aside by 6P.M. in the evening in order to get a good night’s sleep but they also fascinated me. I subsequently worked my way through all of Stephen King’s earlier books as well as those of Dean R. Koontz.

I have read a large number of classics, in particular, I enjoy Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Charles Dickens and the works of the Bronte sisters.

I am hugely interested in the history of the United Kingdom as well as the mythology and tales of the paranormal that are abundant on this intriguing European island.

Connect to Robbie Cheadle

Website/Blog Roberta Writes: https://robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com/
Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/
Website: https://www.robbiecheadle.co.za:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SirChocolateBooks/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bakeandwrite

My thanks to Robbie for sharing this series with us and please join us again next Monday for Part Three of York’s Chocolate Story..

 

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Guest Writer – Robbie Cheadle – The York Chocolate Story Part One


Delighted that over the next five weeks, author Robbie Cheadle will be sharing the The York Chocolate story with us, following her recent trip to the UK.. And I will be featuring a different Sir Chocolate Story and Cookbook each week.

The York Chocolate Story – Part One – Mary Tuke and the Rountree brothers

My family and I visited York on our recent trip to the UK. I had no idea that York has a great chocolate making past or that this city is the UK’s home of chocolate.

Mary Tuke

Mary Tuke was born in York in 1695, to a prominent Quaker family; her grandfather was one of 4,000 people jailed for their beliefs in the 1660s.

In 1725, Mary opened a shop in Walmgate selling groceries. Her shop specialised in selling tea, coffee and cocoa, the last of which was sold as a solid cake. During the Georgian era, cocoa would have been served to the wealthy inhabitants of Micklegate and Bootham for breakfast, mixed with simmering milk or water in an elegant pot to make a chocolate drink.
Trade in York at the time was controlled by the Company of Merchant Adventurers of York.

They set rules and tariffs for trade in York and any non-member setting up a business would be in breach of the law. The Merchant Adventurers went after Mary, tying her up in court cases and threatening her with fines and even prison for over seven years. Eventually, Mary’s tenacity wore them down and she was given a license to trade in York for only GBP 10.

Mary was a spinster and she took her fourteen year old nephew William as an apprentice. When she died in 1752 she left her successful grocery business to William, then aged twenty years old. The business remained in Tuke family hands until 1862, introducing products such as Tukes’ Rich Cocoa, Tukes Plain Chocolate and Tukes Diary Chocolate, when the cocoa division of Tuke & Co was sold to Henry Isaac Rountree.

The Rountrees

In 1869, his brother Joseph joined the company, which was failing, and used his experience as a master grocer to turn the company around. The first great success for the Rountree brothers came in 1881 when, with the help of a French confectioner, the firm began to manufacture pastilles which had previously been imported from France.

In 1883, Henry died at the age of 45 years old and Joseph took over the business. He developed Rountree’s Elect Cocoa in 1887 which also became very popular.

It was George Harris, the husband of Henry’s granddaughter, Frieda, who was instrumental in creating the confectionary giant we know today. George pioneered a new style of branding in terms of which brand was king, and brought Rountree’s into the modern age. It was during this period that many of Rountree’s biggest brands were created including KitKat, Black Magic, Aero, Dairy Box, Smarties, Rolos and Polos which all came out in the 1930s.

During the 1960’s, Rountree’s merged with Mackintosh’s to become Rountree Mackintosh. Subsequent to this merger, the company launched Quality Street, Rolo and Toffee Crisp.

Rountree’s was acquired by Nestlé in 1988 and the Rowntree brand continues to be used to market Nestlé’s jelly sweet brands, such as Fruit Pastilles and Fruit Gums.

KitKat vending machine from the 1970’s on display at York’s Chocolate Story.

Previous Rountree brand leaders used in the creation of Chocolate Land and its characters

Chocolate house with a KitKat roof and Smarties decoration which features on the front cover of Sir Chocolate and the Condensed Milk Story and Cookbook

If you are visiting York then you cannot miss a visit to museum: https://www.yorkschocolatestory.com/

©Robbie Cheadle 2019

About Sir Chocolate and the Condensed Milk Story and Cookbook by Robbie and Michael Cheadle.

The Condensed Milk River where Sir Chocolate goes fishing has stopped flowing. The water creatures are losing their homes. Can Sir Chocolate and Lady Sweet solve this problem? Five lovely new recipes are also included.;

One of the reviews for the book

What a lovely, fun book to read! The poems are fun to read out loud and the illustrations of fondant look so yummy. The recipe is there for making marshmallow flowers too so we can try our hand at making our own. This is the first book I’ve read in the series and want to read the others. We’re always looking for new projects we can do together and this project is the next on our list! The trolls are adorable, too. Highly recommended.

A selection of other Sir Chocolate stories and other books by Robbie Cheadle

Read all the reviews and buy the books:https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

Read more reviews and follow Robbie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle

About Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with five published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

I have been drawn to the horror and supernatural genres of books all my life. At the age of ten years old I embarked on reading Stephen King’s books including The Shining and Salem’s Lot. These books scared me so much I had to put them aside by 6P.M. in the evening in order to get a good night’s sleep but they also fascinated me. I subsequently worked my way through all of Stephen King’s earlier books as well as those of Dean R. Koontz.

I have read a large number of classics, in particular, I enjoy Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Charles Dickens and the works of the Bronte sisters.

I am hugely interested in the history of the United Kingdom as well as the mythology and tales of the paranormal that are abundant on this intriguing European island.

Connect to Robbie Cheadle

Website/Blog Roberta Writes: https://robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com/
Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/
Website: https://www.robbiecheadle.co.za:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SirChocolateBooks/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bakeandwrite

My thanks to Robbie for sharing this series with us and please join us again next Monday for Part Two of York’s Chocolate Story..