Smorgasbord Blogger Daily – Thursday March 5th 2020 – #Legacy Sue Vincent, #Afghanistan 24 Mary Smith, #Weather Carol Taylor


The first post today is from Sue Vincent and I hope that you will head over to read the post in full… you will understand why when you have read it… very thought provoking and life affirming. We all matter and our presence in the world has an impact on people and events around us, even if it is only one person, or in a split second.

A horseshoe nail…

Horse's eye

For want of a nail the shoe was lost.
For want of a shoe the horse was lost.
For want of a horse the rider was lost.
For want of a rider the message was lost.
For want of a message the battle was lost.
For want of a battle the kingdom was lost.
And all for the want of a horseshoe nail.

That old rhyme has a lot to say. It is usually interpreted as being an admonition to pay attention to the small details from which cascade larger events and possibilities. The implication is that if a small thing is overlooked through lack of attention or laziness, then we may wreak havoc with the outcome of whatever we attempt… either individually or in the larger arena of life.

I thought of this rhyme after a comment was made about the pointlessness of an individual life.

Head over to read the rest of this wonderful post, you will not regret it: A Horseshoe Nail by Sue Vincent

Sue Vincent  Buy: Amazon UKand:Amazon USBlog: S.C. VincentGoodreads: Sue Vincent

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Now time for the regular spot for Mary Smith and her Afghan memoir…I love shopping but will admit to taking it for granted… not so for Mary’s young friends.

MarySmith’sPlace – A bit of retail therapy AfghanAdentures#24

Sughra was so excited about her proposed shopping expedition that she was waiting at the foot of the hill, dancing from foot to foot in her impatience. Gul Agha’s youngest brother, Najibullah, was hovering, his usual cheeky grin replaced by a look of anxiety. When told to get into the car his face split into a huge grin of delight.

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Sughra’s father Baqul (which means old man, which he clearly wasn’t!) – the cook at the clinic

I said we’d leave soon but first I had to say hello to her mother and let her know we had Najibullah with us. Sughra’s face fell. ‘She’ll make you drink tea,’ she muttered. I promised I’d refuse.

The house was small, with just two rooms, both of which could fit easily into our living room at the clinic. The door opened directly into the first room – a kitchen and store. The second room provided the living and sleeping accommodation for the family of seven. A threadbare piece of what, once, had been a colourful gilim covered only part of the earth floor, while a small bundle of bedding in a corner constituted the entire furnishing of the room. On the one small, recessed shelf were stored a few medicines (no home was without a plastic bag of pills, syrups and tonics), embroidery materials and a small bundle of clothing.

Head over to read the rest of the shopping adventure and find out more about a family who still smile through their children’s disabilities: A bit of Retail Therapy Afghan Adventures 24 with Mary Smith

Mary Smith, Buy:Amazon US – and:Amazon UK – Website: Mary SmithGoodreads: Goodreads

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And another regular here in the blogger daily, as well as with the food column, is Carol Taylor with her Whimsical Wednesday.. a wonderful mix of

Good morning and we have rain…Long-awaited rain…it has cleared the air and cooled it down…lovely…it has now settled into a steady rain there have been some fierce winds luckily no damage here although some of the houses in the outlying villages haven’t been so lucky…

Thank you for joining me for Whimsical Wednesdays I have no clear idea of what or where my thoughts will take me yet this post is always written on the fly I just start writing and go where my thoughts take me..maybe I should make some tea and let the thoughts flow free…

I can always remember my mum saying “Beware the Ides of March her other saying sticks in my head is ” March comes “in like a lion, out like a lamb.”…I always thought she referred to the weather…Well, not so in 1973…

March 1973 was the year my oldest son arrived into the world…March is notorious for being wed, windy and cold so my baby layette consisted of lots of hand-knitted cardigans, bonnets and blankets…Not so when Sean came into the world on the 14th of March it was hot and sunny…my mother who always came and stayed for the first 2 weeks of my confinement was drying and airing his nappies outside it was so warm…he slept in a cotton vest and a nappy it was too hot for the winter clothes we had ready for him…There was a mad dash around the shops by my sisters and friends for little cotton suits…147 hrs of sunny shine…

Head over to enjoy more weather, trivia about March and Frankie Lane and some music from Wet Wet Wet (appropriately) Whimsical Wednesday with Carol Taylor

Enjoy the new series for 2020 : Carol Taylor – A-Z of Food

Thanks for dropping in and I hope you will head over to enjoy all the posts in full..thanks Sally.