Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – October 4th – 10th 2020 – Streisand, Narcissism, Dog Sitting, Mending Fences, books, reviews and funnies


Welcome to the round up of posts that you might have missed on Smorgasbord this week.

So here we are all again and how quickly time flies when you are enjoying yourself…I say that without a trace of sarcasm honestly… if it were not for the blog and for the daily visits from all of you I think I would have found the last 8 months very difficult.

Not that there are not things that need to be done! – I have not got anymore housework done that I do normally (which is not a great deal). There is the matter of the short story collection due out in November to finish, two novels, a large tapestry of an elephant and her baby, the summer clothes as yet unworn to be put away back in their winter quarters, and winter clothes to be ironed and put back on hangers. I will leave the sequin jacket and dancing shoes where they are as we won’t be doing any partying anytime soon…although a quick shuffle around the dining room is not out of the question to the right music.

I do have 35 books awaiting reading and reviewing and I am trying to do that in a timely fashion. I know that at the end of the month I will be heading off to Amazon again to buy another ten or twelve that have been recommended by others here or I have spotted on others’ blogs. One of the downsides of promoting authors and reading through their reviews to showcase but I am not complaining, just my TBR like most of yours.

I have also been doing some updated research on a number of health conditions and despite the Covid – 19 focus on getting a vaccine and treatments, there are still some interesting advances in other areas of medical research.. I will be putting together a new Health in the News in November.

The author spotlight ends tomorrow, but I went through my files and unearthed some author interviews from 2015 onwards for authors who are very much a part of my community and I will be repeating those on Sundays up to the end of the year. I have updated with their current books and reviews and I hope you will enjoy again after all this time.

I hope you have enjoyed the week as much as I have and my thanks as always to the contributors who take time and a great deal of thought to put together interesting and entertaining posts.. this week William Price King shares part three of the Barbra Streisand story and you can find William’s own posts and also very kindly a selection of Smorgasbord’s on his  Blog– IMPROVISATION William Price King on Tumblr

Also this week D.G. Kaye, Debby Gies shares her wisdom on narcissism in the family and some of the reasons behind this insidious and damaging mental issue. Also thanks to my guest Jane Sturgeon for her entertaining life changing moment…

And a special thank you to author Judith Barrow who has kindly set up a directory on her blog to share posts from Smorgasbord.. a huge honour thanks Judith Judith Barrow Blog

Thank you for supporting all of us and it is much appreciated.

Life and Music of Barbra Streisand Part Three -collaborations in the 1970s and 1980s

D. G. Kaye Explores the Realms of Relationships -October 2020 -Envy, Jealousy, Bullying – A Path to Narcissism?

Life Changing Moments – Dog Sitting with a twist or two by Jane Sturgeon

Sam, A Shaggy Dog Story – Chapter Ten – Sleepovers with new friends

Shakespeare and Traditional Fencing Methods

20th Anniversary #Free Book and Some of my Very Odd Jobs – The Steak House Part Two by Sally Cronin

Pub landlady Cowes Isle of Wight

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Poetry – In Remembrance – The War Poets – Edmund Blunden

-My parents arrive – Part One – Stetsons, Yellow Roses, Pappasito’s and Chi Chis

Western #Horror #Thriller – Guns of Perdition – The Armageddon Showdown Book 1 by Jessica Bakkers

Past Book Reviews – #IrishHistory Andrew Joyce, #Shortstories Mary Smith

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The endocrine system and hormones Part One

Essential Oils and Aromatherapy – Oils, origins, uses and Safety – Part Two

Summer 2020- Pot Luck- Book Reviews by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

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Share your Children’s book reviews – #PictureBooks with Jennie Fitzkee Part Two

Sam the Speedy Sloth by Matthew Ralph reviewed by Barbara Ann Mojica

#Fantasy D. Wallace Peach Reviews #YAFantasy Heather Kindt, #Contemporary Carol LaHines, #ShortStories Elizabeth Merry

#Poetry Geoff Le Pard, Reviews -#Dystopian Harmony Kent, #WWII Marina Osipova

#Poetry Frank Prem, Reviews #Crime Jane Risdon, #Thriller Gwen Plano

Smorgasbord Laughter Lines – Oct 6th 2020 – Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin

October 8th 2020 – Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Protests and Clean Plates

Host Sally Cronin – What do you mean I can’t park here?

 

Thanks again for dropping by and as always your feedback is much appreciated… Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine Weekly Round Up – September 27th – October 3rd – Don Shirley, Salsa, The Pack, Books, Reviews, Health and Laughter.


Welcome to the round up of posts on Smorgasbord that you might have missed this week.

The weeks may be flying passed rapidly as we head into autumn and nature at least seems to be keeping to its schedule.. The news headlines are not improving with regard to Covid 19 and it seems that even those who have levels of protection we are not provided still are at risk. Our own Prime Minister and other cabinet members have been infected and certainly judging by the fatigue and signs of stress they are all showing, it is not something you bounce back from overnight.

All is relatively quiet in the Emerald Isles except for isolated clusters but cases have been on the rise, and hitting the younger demographic. Possibly because every person in my age bracket is wearing a mask and the majority gloves to do their shopping and stepping around each other in the supermarket in some quirky form of the samba.

The young feel invincible, and it is understandable that they are frustrated with the restrictions. Surely if they are bright enough to go to college and university, they are bright enough to understand that having 1000 strong rave until 2.00 in the morning with lots of physical contact, singing and shouting at each other over the noise of the music, and sweating as they dance, is not going to be boycotted by the virus.. Despite the fact most of the music would keep me away.

Then they wonder why there is a spike in infections two weeks later… perhaps commonsense is not on the curriculum!

Anyway enough of the grumpy old woman!

Classic Editor

On a brighter note I am hop, skipping and jumping all over the place to keep my classic editor going.. At least for the time being I still have the option and hopefully they will keep their promise until December 2021. It does involve remembering to click down options and select the classic version so you need to keep your wits about you.

Revisit to Author Interviews.

I am also doing a tidy up of my files and revisiting guest interviews over the last five years. Where information is reasonably current I am updating with the authors books and reviews and will be posting a selection of interviews on Sunday’s once the current series finishes on October 11th. The posts will take us nicely up to Christmas (sorry about using that word!) and then I will think about a new interview theme for the New Year…

My thanks as always to William Price King and Carol Taylor for their amazing contributions this week, and to you for all the support…

William Price King with Classical and Jazz Pianist Don Shirley #TheGreenBook

A – Z of Food ‘S’ for Satay, Salsa, Salmagundi, Sage, Squid and Salt Hoss

Shake the Dust off your Feet by Sherri Matthews

Chapter Nine – Other Pack Members and Respect your Elders

#Ireland #1930s – Divine Guidance

Some very odd jobs – The Shoe Department.

The Cosmetic Department

#Free Book and Some of my Very Odd Jobs – The Steak House Part One

October 1985 – Have a Nice Day… In the Big Apple

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Part Two – Nitrate and Potassium foods and wholegrains -Get your blood flowing

Essential Oils and Aromatherapy – Oils, origins, uses and Safety – Part One

#Supernatural Adventure Eternal Road: The Final Stop by John W. Howell.

Past Book Reviews – #ParanormalThriller John W. Howell and Gwen Plano, #Thriller Toni Pike.

Share your review – Brody Cody and the Stepmother from Outer Space by Toni Pike, Reviewed by D.G. Kaye

#Thriller, Donovan: Thief for Hire: The Body on the Underwater Road by Chuck Bowie

#Psychologicalthriller – Becoming Insane by Leyla Cardena

#Poetry Denise O’Hagan, #Historical Allan Hudson, #Novel Margaret Lindsay Holton, Dystopian Terry Tyler

#Western Jan Sikes, #Contemporary Ritu Bhathal, #Mystery Richard W. Wise, New Release Anita Dawes

New Release #Family James J. Cudney, Reviews – #Thriller Susanne Leist, #Mystery Geoff Le Pard

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Wireless doorbells and Stud Fees

Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – More Doorbells and a Talking Dog

October 2nd 2020 – Another Open Mic Night with author Daniel Kemp

 

Thank you for dropping in and I hope you have enjoyed the posts… enjoy your weekend..thanks Sally

 

Smorgasbord Music Column – William Price King with Classical and Jazz Pianist Don Shirley #TheGreenBook


This week William Price King introduces us to the life and music of American classical and jazz pianist and composer Don Shirley, the musician that is featured in the recent film Green Book which is well worth watching.

Donald Walbridge Shirley (January 29, 1927 – April 6, 2013) was an American classical and jazz pianist and composer. He recorded many albums for Cadence Records during the 1950s and 1960s, experimenting with jazz with a classical influence. He wrote organ symphonies, piano concerti, a cello concerto, three string quartets, a one-act opera, works for organ, piano and violin, a symphonic tone poem based on the 1939 novel Finnegans Wake by James Joyce, and a set of “Variations” on the 1858 opera Orpheus in the Underworld.

Born in Pensacola, Florida, Shirley was a promising young student of classical piano. Although he did not achieve recognition in his early career playing traditional classical music, he found success with his blending of various musical traditions.

Discouraged by the lack of opportunities for classical black musicians, Shirley abandoned the piano as a career for a time. He studied psychology at the University of Chicago[14] and began work in Chicago as a psychologist. There he returned to music. He was given a grant to study the relationship between music and juvenile crime, which had broken out in the postwar era of the early 1950s. Playing in a small club, he experimented with sound to determine how the audience responded. The audience was unaware of his experiments and that students had been planted to gauge their reactions

During the 1960s, Shirley went on a number of concert tours, some in Deep South states. For a time, he hired New York nightclub bouncer Tony “Lip” Vallelonga as his driver and bodyguard. Their story was dramatized in the 2018 film Green Book, in which he was played by Mahershala Al

In late 1968, Shirley performed the Tchaikovsky concerto with the Detroit Symphony. He also worked with the Chicago Symphony and the National Symphony Orchestra.He wrote symphonies for the New York Philharmonic and Philadelphia Orchestra. He played as soloist with the orchestra at Milan’s La Scala opera house in a program dedicated to George Gershwin’s music. Russian-born composer Igor Stravinsky, who was a contemporary of Shirley’s, said of him, “His virtuosity is worthy of Gods. Discover more about the life of Don Shirley: Wikipedia

Now time for a small selection of tracks from the albums of Don Shirley

“How High the Moon” was written by Morgan Lewis and Nancy Hamilton and first appeared in the 1940 Broadway revue “Two for the Show”. This piece later became Ella Fitzgerald’s signature song. Don Shirley is featured here in this rare live performance with his trio: bassist Ken Fricker, and the cellist Juri Taht.

“Dancing on the Ceiling” from the album “Don Shirley Presents Martha Flowers” was composed by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart in 1930 for the musical Ever Green. Originally it was part of the musical “Simple Simon” but was taken out of the production just before opening night. The game show “Name that Tune” back in the 1970s presented this song on their program and it was correctly identified and the winner took home the grand prize of $100,000. Whereas conventional jazz trios used drums or guitars to supplement rhythm Shirley’s decision to use classical cello goes a long way in highlighting his aesthetic, which the fancy setting of this old standard exemplifies.

“Orpheus in the Underworld”, released in 1956 on the Cadence label, is a set of original rhapsodies that Shirley based on his own painting which happens to appear on the cover of the album. These improvised rhapsodies do not get your typical jazz treatment, rather a reminder of the classical pianist of the year 1800 spontaneously creating fantasies and moods.

“Water boy”, from the 1965 Columbia album of the same name, is an old prison song, and Avery Robinson’s arrangement of this piece expresses the flavor of the thud of the mallet on the rocks that prisoners were compelled to split. Juri Taht’s cello thuds project this image – a heartbreaking, continuous pounding sound which is interrupted only in the middle refrain by the prisoner’s memories of freedom as the melody presents a glimpse of hope, but then reality sets in, and the water boy returns to the reality of the suffering in his life.

Buy the music of Don Shirley: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK

 

My thanks to William for the amazing artists he has brought to the blog and thank you for dropping in today.  As always your feedback is very welcome.

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

Blog– IMPROVISATION William Price King on Tumblr – Buy William’s music: William Price King iTunes – FacebookWilliam Price King – Twitter@wpkofficial
Regular VenueCave Wilson

 

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Music Column with William Price King – Josh Groban Part Three


Welcome to the new series and over the next few weeks William Price King will be sharing the career and music of Josh GrobanYou can find Part Two: Here

“Let Me Fall” from the Cirque du Soleil’s “Quidam” is another gem from the album “Josh Groban,” and was penned by James Corcoran and Benoît Jutras. The Cirque du Soleil (Circus of the Sun or Sun Circus) is a Canadian entertainment company. It is the largest theatrical producer in the world. Situated in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and located in the inner-city area of Saint-Michel, it was founded in Baie-Saint-Paul on 7 July 1984, by two former street performers, Guy Laliberté and Gilles Ste-Croix. “Quidam” was the ninth stage show produced by the “Cirque du Soleil.”

In 2003, he received the Billboard Music Award for No. 1 Classical Crossover Artist of the Year. Some of Groban’s musical influences have been Radiohead, Steve Perry, Paul Simon, Sting, Peter Gabriel, Freddie Mercury, and Bjork. He cites as vocal influences “anyone who told a story with their songs,” including “Mandy Patinkin, Klaus Nomi, George Hearn, and Luciano Pavarotti.

“You Raise Me Up” is from Groban’s second studio album “Closer,” released in 2003. David Foster decided to produce this song after being introduced to it by Frank Petrone of Peermusic, the song’s publisher. He chose Groban to record the song, which was accompanied by the tenor Craig Von Vennik of the Establishment. Groban’s version made it to #1 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary Chart in early 2004 and remained there for six weeks. This version also peaked at #73 on the Billboard Hot 100, his first single to do so, and was nominated for a 2005 Grammy award. Groban performed the song in a special NASA commemoration for the crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster. A special surprise performance by Groban, for Oprah Winfrey’s 50th birthday, also gave “You Raise Me Up” massive international prominence.

The song was originally composed as an instrumental piece and titled “Silent Story.” Some have claimed there is a strong resemblance to the traditional Irish tune “Londonderry Air,” to which Løvland has commented: “There are similarities but no plagiarism. When I made “You Raise Me Up” I asked myself – what is the inner essence of Irish music?” Løvland later approached Irish novelist and songwriter Brendan Graham to write the lyrics to his melody, after reading Graham’s novels.

“Remember When It Rained,” written by Groban and Eric Mouquet, is from the album “Closer” and also on the live album “Live at the Greek” (2004). When he plays the piano on this piece, he is outstanding. He performs with a freedom and expression that is engaging, as if the instrument were feeding his emotional core. This is an incredible performance.

Groban said that he believed that this second album was a better reflection of him, and that his audience would be able to get a better idea of his personality from listening to it.
What most people know about me, they know through my music. This time, I’ve tried to open that door as wide as possible. These songs are a giant step closer to who I really am and what my music is all about. Hence the title.”

In the summer of 2004, Groban returned to Interlochen, Great Performances” special on PBS. Also in 2004, Groban performed “Remember When It Rained,” backed by a full orchestra, at the American Music Awards, where he was nominated for Favorite Male Artist in the pop category; he was also nominated for a People’s Choice Award in that year.

Groban earned his first Grammy nomination in 2005 for his single “You Raise Me Up” in the “Best Male pop Vocal Performance category. Youtube Channel.Josh Groban

 

“You Are Loved (Don’t Give Up)” is the second track and the first single from Groban’s third album, “Awake,” released in November 2006. The song’s music and lyrics were written by Tawgs Salter. The single peaked at #9 on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart. The music video was directed by Meiert Avis. This song was featured in the TV series “The Simpsons,” episode “Lisa the Drama Queen” where Lisa and Juliet sing this piece while on the playground at their school. Youtube Channel.Josh Groban

Groban’s “Awake” world tour visited 71 cities between February and August 2007, and toured Australia and the Philippines with Lani Misalucha as his special guest in October 2007.

As to his future, Groban was open to a plethora of possibilities. He said, “I am fortunate enough to have had many really big moments in my career. I think the mistake a lot of people in my position make is to always search for the next big thing. I am looking forward to playing some small theaters. I’m looking forward to writing more. I want to delve further into my acting career and explore some of the film and TV opportunities that I haven’t had time for. My outlook is to expect the unexpected. And when the next step comes, I’m prepared to take it.”

“Petit Papa Noël” (literally Little Father Christmas) from Groban’s album “Noël,” is a 1946 song originally recorded by French singer Tino Rossi. Written by Raymond Vincy and Henri Martinet, this song was performed by Rossi in Richard Pottier’s film “Destins.” It is currently the best-selling single of all time in France, with over 5,711,000 units sold. “Noël is Groban’s Christmas and fourth studio album, which was released in October 2007. According to Nielsen SoundScan, the album sold 3,699,000 copies in 2007 after its release, making it the overall best-selling album in the US for all of 2007. Youtube Channel.Josh Groban

Buy the music of Josh Groban : Amazon US – And: Amazon UK
Find out more about Josh Groban and tour information: Josh Groban Official Site
Other sources: Wikipedia

Join us next time for part four and more music from Josh Groban..

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION William Price King on Tumblr

Buy William’s music ITunes William Price King iTunes

Connect with William

FacebookWilliam Price King
Twitter@wpkofficial
Regular VenueCave Wilson

My thanks to William for the amazing artists he has brought to the blog and thank you for dropping in today.  As always your feedback is very welcome. William is on his summer break but will be back in person in September.

 

Smorgasbord Summer Music Festival with hosts William Price King and Sally Cronin – Headliners Aretha Franklin, Bruce Springsteen and Chris de Burgh


The music festivals such as Glastonbury will not be laid on this year with thousands of fans putting their glamping (and less than glam) weekends on hold until next year.

Whilst not the same as sitting in the rain and mud, amongst thousands of other fans listening to the headliners, over the next three months, every two weeks, we will be staging a summer music festival of our own.

William Price King has been writing the music column for the last five years, showcasing wonderful musicians and singers of the last 75 years and I will be playing music from those series.

I will be also sharing tracks from my favourite music from the last 50 years across the rock and roll, country and pop charts.

We hope you will enjoy the music…

From the Aretha Franklin Series

“Respect” is a song written and originally released by Otis Redding in 1965. The song became a 1967 hit and signature song for Aretha Franklin. The music in the two versions is significantly different, and through a few changes in the lyrics, the stories told by the songs have a different flavor. Redding’s version is a plea from a desperate man, who will give his woman anything she wants. He won’t care if she does him wrong, as long as he gets his due respect when he brings money home. However, Franklin’s version is a declaration from a strong, confident woman, who knows that she has everything her man wants. She never does him wrong, and demands his “respect.” Franklin’s version adds the “R-E-S-P-E-C-T” chorus and the backup singers’ refrain of “Sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me…”

Franklin’s cover was a landmark for the feminist movement, and is often considered as one of the best songs of the R&B era, earning her two Grammy Awards in 1968 for “Best Rhythm & Blues Recording” and “Best Rhythm & Blues Solo Vocal Performance, Female”, and was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1987. I

“I Say a Little Prayer,” written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David for Dionne Warwick in 1966, returned to the Pop & R&B Top Ten in the fall of 1968 via Aretha Franklin, taken from her 1968 album “Aretha Now.” Franklin and background vocalists “The Sweet Inspirations” were singing the song for fun while rehearsing the songs intended for the album when the viability of their recording “I Say a Little Prayer” became apparent, significantly re-invented from the format of the Dionne Warwick original via the prominence of Clayton Ivey’s piano work.

In October 1968 “I Say a Little Prayer” reached number ten and number three on the R&B singles chart. The same month the single was certified Gold by the RIAA. “Prayer” became Franklin’s ninth and last consecutive Hot 100 top 10 hit on the Atlantic label.

Buy Aretha Franklin Music: Amazon US –  Official website: Aretha Franklin – Additional Information: Wikipedia

I love Bruce Springsteen  and the E Street Band, and it was tough to find just one song to share from his fantastic Born in the USA album of in 1984…

Born in the U.S.A.

Working on the Highway was not one of the seven tracks released as singles but was always a concert favourite…it began life in 1982 originally for the Nebraska album – Bruce Springsteen

 

Buy Bruce Springsteen music: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK – Official site and live concert dates: Bruce Springsteen

Into the Light

The next track is one of the most romantic tracks for me from the 1980s… Lady in Red.. by Irish/British singer Chris de Burgh written as a tribute to the first time he saw his wife…from the album Into the Light released in 1986..The album is just one of his that I have and I can recommend this one in particular. Uploaded by georange

 

Buy the music of Chris de Burgh: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK – Official Site: Chris de Burgh

Thanks for tuning in this week.. William is on his summer break but will be back with a new series in September.. in the meantime we hope you will enjoy the summer of music.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Music Column with William Price King – Josh Groban – Part One


Welcome to the new series and over the next few weeks William Price King will be sharing the career and music of Josh Groban.

Today an introduction to this extremely talented singer, songwriter and actor, who has wowed audiences around the world with his distinctive baritone voice.

Josh Groban was born in Los Angeles in 1981 into a musical family. His mother Lindy was a school teacher and his father Jack a businessman and also an accomplished pianist. One of his grandmothers began to teach piano to Josh at age three and his parents introduced him to a wide variety of musical styles from opera to pop. A trait echoed in his own music years later, Groban has said that he was drawn to musicians “who decided not to settle into one particular musical style.”

It was not long before Josh was performing on stage when his music teacher chose him to sing the George Gershwin song ‘S’wonderful’ from the Broadway hit ‘Funny Face’. At that time Josh was more focused on his acting and performed in his high school’s production of ‘Fiddler on the Roof’.

In 1997 and 1998 Josh attended the Interlochen Centre for the Arts summer camp in Michigan, majoring in music theater and taking vocal lessons.

Seth Riggs, Josh’s vocal coach, happened to be a friend of David Foster, a Grammy-winning producer, writer and arranger as well as Brian Avnet who was to become his manager and introduced them in 1998. This introduction led to Josh Groban acting as a rehearsal singer at some high-profile events including the 1999 Grammy Awards, where as a stand-in for Andrea Bocelli, he rehearsed David Foster’s ‘The Prayer’ with Celine Dion.  Although nervous at the prospect, Josh was so impressive that the host of the event Rosie O’Donnell, asked him to appear on her show the following week, leading to an appearance on ‘Ally McBeal’.

Josh majored in theater at The Los Angeles High School for the Arts and graduated in 1999. Following four months of the first semester at Carnegie Mellon University studying musical theater, Josh Groban left after being offered a recording contract, and the start of his meteoric singing career.

Creator David E. Kelley created character Malcolm Wyatt for Groban in the season finale of ‘Ally McBeal’ aired in May 2001. The character of Malcolm Wyatt was so popular, prompting 8,000 emails from viewers, that Groban was asked to return the next season to reprise his role and perform “To Where You Are.” Avnet claims this sequence of events effectively got Groban’s career off the ground

Some of the prestigious nominations for Josh Groban’s work.

Josh Groban has been nominated for four Grammy Awards. In 2005 for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance for ‘You Raise Me Up’. 2009 for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album for ‘Noel’, which was also nominated for International Album of the Year in 2008 for the Juno Awards. 2016 Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album for ‘Stages’ and again in 2017 for ‘Stages Live’

In 2017 Josh was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Performance of an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical in ‘Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812′

Josh Groban has released 7 Studio Albums, 4 Live Albums and 30 singles with over 30 million records sold worldwide. Josh Groban Discography

Here is how it all began….. Celine Dion shares how she first met Josh Groban and they then perform ‘The Prayer’.

Buy the music of Josh Groban : Amazon US
And: Amazon UK
Find out more about Josh Groban and tour information: Josh Groban Official Site
Other sources: Wikipedia

Join us next time for part two and more music from Josh Groban..

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION William Price King on Tumblr

Buy William’s music ITunes William Price King iTunes

Connect with William

FacebookWilliam Price King
Twitter@wpkofficial
Regular Venue – Cave Wilson

My thanks to William for the amazing artists he has brought to the blog and thank you for dropping in today.  As always your feedback is very welcome.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Music Column with William Price King with Grammy-winning Jazz Legend Ramsey Lewis


This week William Price King shares the music of Ramsey Lewis and his incredible 50 years in the contemporary jazz movement.

Ramsey Lewis has been an iconic leader in the contemporary jazz movement for over 50 years with an unforgettable sound and outgoing personality that has allowed him to crossover to the pop and R&B charts. Throughout his illustrious career, Lewis who is a NEA Jazz Master, has also joined forces with countless other artists to create new and innovative music.

You can find out more about him on his official website: Ramsey Lewis

Now for some music from this jazz legend and his trio.

“The In Crowd” (an instrumental version of Dobie Gray’s Top 40 hit, written by Billy Page) provided Lewis with his most successful recording which reached #1 on the Billboard R&B Chart and No. 2 on their top 200 albums chart in 1965, remaining there for 47 weeks. This irresistible, understated party-starter was considered the epitome of mid-60s cool. What’s incredible about this album being so high on the charts is that it was up there with the likes of the Beatles’ Help!, which was #1. Right below at #3 was Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited.

On down the list were Sonny and Cher, The Rolling Stones, and Barbra Streisand. This was an amazing achievement for a jazz trio. The album marked the start of soul-jazz. The single of the same name reached No. 2 on the R&B Chart and No. 5 on the Hot 100 singles chart the same year. The album was recorded live at Bohemian Caverns, a Washington, D.C. night club with Ramsey Lewis on piano, Eldee Young on bass and cello, and Redd Holt on drums. « The In Crowd » received a Grammy Award in 1966 for Best Instrumental Jazz Performance by an Individual or Group. The single was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2009.

“ Hang on Sloopy”, is the title track of a live 1965 recording (released on Rhapsody in 1966) by the Ramsey Lewis Trio, reaching #6 on the US R&B chart, #11 on the US pop chart, and #18 on the US adult contemporary chart. Like « The In Crowd, » it achieved gold status. For the recording of this album there was an enthusiastic crowd at the night club who provided a party atmosphere as they clapped along with the rhythm and on familiar tunes. The trio was at its best as Lewis exploited blues riffs and plagal cadences* while Young and Holt provided a strong backbeat.*

*Plagal cadence – A chord progression where the subdominant chord is followed by the tonic chord, which is also known as a church cadence because it is sung to the word Amen at the conclusion of protestant hymns.

*Backbeat – A rhythmic accentuation on even beats.

“Les Fleur” is from the album Maiden Voyage, recorded in 1968 and released on the Cadet label. This is beautiful, adventurous and ethereal baroque soul jazz/jazz funk/jazz pop at its best. “Les Fleur” was written and arranged by Charles Stepney. The album ‘Maiden Voyage’ features the Earth, Wind and Fire drummer Maurice White, and also songstress Minnie Ripperton. « Les Fleur » is an extraordinarily beautiful melody and embraces both intimacy and majesty to a haunting effect. For unknown reasons the original record label spelled the song as “Les Fleur”, although the French plural of ‘La Fleur’ (flower) is ‘Les Fleurs.’ Lewis is accompanied on this album by Cleveland Eaton on bass, and Maurice White on drums.

“Sun Goddess”, from the album by the same name, has a jazz-inflected, uplifting melody with superb wordless vocals by Earth Wind and Fire’s Phillip Bailey, whose incredible falsetto and rhythm guitar-paced groove shine throughout. It is evident from this album that Lewis had transformed himself into a jazz/fusion/funk musician, riffing on electric piano and synthesizer while at the same time exploring progressive rock. This was Lewis’ biggest hit since ‘The In Crowd’ and dominated the airwaves during the mid ‘70s. « Sun Goddess » was pinned by Maurice White (Earth Wind and Fire) and released on Columbia Records in 1974, reaching #1 on the Billboard Top Soul Albums chart and jazz chart, and #12 on the Billboard Top Pop Albums chart. It was certified gold in the US by the RIAA.

Buy the music of Ramsey Lewis: Amazon US

And: Amazon UK

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Buy William’s music ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Connect with William

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/wpkofficial
Regular Venuehttp://cave-wilson.com/ 

You can find all of the Music Column series in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-music-column/

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Music Column with William Price King – Saxophonist Ornette Coleman 1930 – 2015


This week William Price King shares the life and music of jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman.

Randolph Denard Ornette Coleman was an American jazz saxophonist, violinist, trumpeter, and composer. He was one of the major innovators of the free jazz movement of the 1960s.

About Ornette Coleman courtesty of his official website: Celebrate Ornette

Ornette Coleman, the lightning rod. The most polarizing figure in the history of jazz. The alto saxophonist who outwitted segregation to hit the scene in 1959 and turn the music world on its head. Bursting through bebop and inventing harmolodics, a sound flowing with the unpredictable rhythms of being. He was called rebellious, disruptive, a fraud, thrown off band stands, horn mangled, shunned by his peers, rejected. Choosing to leave the music scene for long stretches, insisting his music be heard on concert stages and not restricted to small smoky basements. Knowing the cost of being a free thinker. He was guided by his harmolodic philosophy of love and expressing life’s surprises through art. Born in Texas, on March 9,1930, he is now called a genius, an icon, a legend, known as one of the most important figures in the history of music. One who is admired by artists across all genres for his convictions, the fight for freedom of creativity and to be one’s self. Ornette passed away in June 2015 at age 85; but his harmolodic song goes on.

Ornette Coleman’s earthly accolades, like his Mac Arthur “Genius” Fellowship, Grammy and Pulitzer Prize for Music, reflect the respect due to a soft-spoken man of small stature but giant mind. He dared to sidestep the system, both socially and musically, shape his life’s trajectory to his will against all odds – and forever change the way music is listened to and played.

Humble, yet with an impish twinkle, Coleman dressed in peacock silks and fine tailoring. His wardrobe was drenched with color and texture – as was his music. Throughout his career, Coleman never stopped evolving, and each phase of expression opened new sonic possibilities. Abandoning the 1950s bebop avant-garde. Switching from small, contemplative 1960s groupings to storming electric combos in the 1970s and ‘80s, driven by funky double bass and drums. Moroccan and Nigerian excursions. Philharmonic orchestra symphonies. Chamber music suites. Eerie film soundtracks. Hip-hop poetry. Coleman always lived up to the double-dare titles of his first galvanic recordings, like “The Shape of Jazz To Come.”

From the go, the players juggled with the risky science of harmolodics. The essential melodic core of the piece is firmly stated; then, ignoring a traditional 4-bar structure, they journey through their own ever-changing improvisations, attuned to each other’s flow, their individual lines embracing anew when they meet to resolve a theme.

Find out more about this extraordinary artist: http://www.ornettecoleman.com/ornette-coleman-biography/

Now time to listen to some music that demonstrates the powerful influence this artist had on the jazz world.

“Lonely Woman” (from the album “The Shape of Jazz to Come”, Coleman’s debut album on Atlantic Records, released in 1959) features Don Cherry on trumpet, Charlie Haden on bass, and Billy Higgins on drums. “Lonely Woman” was Coleman’s first composition to become a jazz standard and spotlights his playing at its most poignant and lyrical. What inspired Coleman to write this song was a photograph of a woman, seemingly very sad, that he saw in a gallery where everything in the background of the photograph indicated wealth. Having never experienced wealth himself he understood the feeling of sadness which he could relate to. He let those emotions guide him through this composition. In 2003, the album “The Shape of Jazz to Come” was ranked # 248 on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The Penguin Guide to Jazz awarded the album a four star rating. The album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2015.

“Dancing in your Head”, released in 1977 on Horizon Records, is the fourth title this popular jazz melody has enjoyed. It originally appeared as “School Work” from Coleman’s Science Fiction album in 1971, as “The Good Life” in 1972 from the album “Skies of America”, and in 1977 “Theme from a Symphony”, which references “Skies of America” from the album “Dancing in your Head”. This infectious danceable melody is Coleman’s trademark and consequently became known as “Dancing in your Head”. Coleman gave the jazz world a new sound when he recorded this album with his new electric band, Prime Time. “Dancing in your Head” was voted the 15th best album of the year in The Village Voice’s annual ‘Pazz & Joe’ critic’s poll, making it the first jazz album ever to make the poll.

You can listen to the full album: https://youtu.be/23QVY94tAj0

“Song X” was recorded by Ornette Coleman and guitarist Pat Metheny over a three day period as a free jazz album in 1985 for Geffen Records. The album features Charlie Haden on bass, Jack DeJohnette on drums, and Coleman’s son Denardo on percussions. The sound of Coleman’s saxophone was combined with a saxophone preset on Methany’s guitar synthesizer which created a fusion of the human sound of Ornette’s alto with the sometimes jarring, mostly bracing electronic sound of Methany’s guitar-synthesizer. ‘The Village Voice’ reviewed the album as Coleman’s best jazz project since the early 1970s, saying that Metheny’s calm style (no rock moves, and no funk) kept the music smooth. “Song X” was voted the 19th best album of 1986 in the Village Voice’s annual Pazz & Jop critic’s poll.

“Sleep Talking” is from the album “Sound Grammar”, a document of a 2005 concert recorded live on tour in Ludwigshafen, Germany, celebrating Coleman’s 75th birthday featuring Ornette Coleman on saxophone, violin, and trumpet; Denardo Coleman on drums; Gregory Cohen and Tony Falanga on bass. Coleman won the Pulitzer Prize for music for “Sound Grammar” in 2007, the first jazz work to be bestowed with the honor. This album highlights compositions from across Coleman’s career. The song “Sleep Talking” was originally recorded as “Sleep Talk” from Coleman’s 1979 studio album “Of Human Feelings” on the Antilles label. Coleman’s saxophone is as rich and exciting as ever and the two bass format generates a warm and groovy soundscape.

 

Additional souce: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ornette_Coleman

Buy the music of Ornette Coleman: https://www.amazon.com/Ornette-Coleman/e/B000AQ13RS

Thanks to William for introducing us to the music of Ornette Coleman and we would love your feedback.

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Buy William’s music ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Connect with William

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/wpkofficial
Regular Venuehttp://cave-wilson.com/ 

You can find all of the Music Column series in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-music-column/

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you have enjoyed the music…thanks William and Sally.

 

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Music Column with William Price King – Bill Evans Jazz Pianist and Composer


This week William Price King shares the life and music of Bill Evans, American Jazz pianist and composer (1929 – 1980).

Before we listen to some of Bill Evan’s music, here is and excerpt fromhis biography from Jan Stevens of  The Bill Evans Web Pages

Bill Evans was born in Plainfield, New Jersey on August 16, 1929 and began his music studies at age 6. Classically trained on piano; he also studied flute and violin as a child. He graduated with a degree in piano performance and teaching from Southeastern Louisiana College (now University) in 1950, and studied composition at Mannes College of Music in New York. After a stint in the Army, he worked in local dance bands, and with clarenetist Tony Scott, Chicago-area singer Lucy Reed and guitarist Mundell Lowe, who brought the young pianist to the attention of producer Orrin Keepnews at Riverside Records.

Evans’ first album was New Jazz Conceptions in 1956, which featured the first recording of his most loved composition, “Waltz for Debby”. It’s follow-up, Everybody Digs Bill Evans was not recorded for another two years; the always shy and self- deprecating pianist claiming he “had nothing new to say.” He gradually got noticed in the NYC jazz scene, for his original piano sound and fluid ideas, when in 1958, Miles Davis asked him to join his group (which also featured John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley) He stayed for nearly a year, touring and recording, and subsequently playing on the all-time classic Kind of Blue album — as well as composing “Blue in Green”, now a jazz standard. His work with Miles helped solidify Bill’s reputation, and in 1959, Evans founded his most innovative trio with the now-legendary bassist Scott LaFaro and with Paul Motian on drums. The trio concept of equal interplay among the musicians was virtually pioneered by Evans, and these albums remain the most popular in his extensive catalog. They did two studio albums together in addition to the famous ‘live” sessions at NYC’s Village Vanguard in 1961. LaFaro’s tragic death in a car accident a few weeks after the Vanguard engagement — an event which personally devastated Bill — sent the pianist into seclusion for a time, after which he returned to the trio format later in 1962, with Motian again, and Chuck Israels on bass.

His 1963 Conversations With Myself album , in which he double and triple-tracked his piano, won him the first of many Grammy® awards and the following year he first toured overseas, playing to packed houses from Paris to Tokyo, now solidifying a worldwide reputation. The great bassist Eddie Gomez began a fruitful eleven year tenure with Bill in 1966, in various trios with drummers Marty Morell, Philly Joe Jones, Jack DeJohnette and others — contributing to some of the most acclaimed club appearances and albums in Evans’s career. His recorded output was considerable — (for Riverside, Verve, Columbia, Fantasy and Warner Bros) over the years, and he also did sessions (especially early on) with some of the top names in jazz. Musicians like Charles Mingus, Art Farmer, Stan Getz, Oliver Nelson, Jim Hall, George Russell, Shelley Manne, Toots Theielmans, Kai Winding /J.J. Johnson, Hal McKusick and others all featured Evans. In the seventies, he recorded extensively– primarily trio and solo piano now and then, but also including several quintet albums under his own name as well two memorable dates with singer Tony Bennett.

His last trio was formed in 1978, featuring the incomparably sensitive Marc Johnson on bass and drummer Joe LaBarbera, which rejuvenated the often-ailing pianist, who was elated with his new line-up, calling it “the most closely related” to his first trio (with LaFaro and Motian).

Please head over to read the rest of his biography at The Bill Evans Web Pages

Now time to listen to some of his music.

“Portrait in Jazz “, (Full Album) recorded by the Bill Evans Trio with Scott LaFaro on bass and Paul Motian on drums, was released in 1960 on the Riverside label just eight months after Evans collaborated with Miles Davis on the album “ Kind of Blue “. Most of the pieces on this album are standards which highlight LaFaro and Motian as equal partners with Evans (each one has his creative space) and their interpretations are far from routine. The result of their team work is quite well-balanced. Evans’ exploration of the ballads on this album illustrates his originality in the way he approaches each melody with his own endearing sound, like crystal notes in a series of waterfalls.

Here is a track from the albumBlue in Green”.

Conversations With Myself” was recorded with Glenn Gould’s piano in 1963, overdubbing three different piano tracks for each song. At that time overdubbing was not looked upon favorably, rather as a gimmick and synthetic. Nonetheless, this album became a jazz classic and earned Evans his first Grammy Award in 1964 for ‘Best Jazz Instrumental Album, Individual Group’ and received a 5-star review in Down Beat in 1963

“The Tony Bennett/Bill Evans album” (Full Album) was recorded in 1975. Tony Bennett and Bill Evans had very little in common except being jazz musicians. Bennett was a very strong extroverted jazz singer with a conservative style whereas Evans was shy, introverted, and impressionistic. But, during this recording they became of like mind as Bennett, with his mastery of phrasing, remained centered, and when each vocal was finished Evans would break into his characteristic lyrical playing turning each piece into a gem.

This track from the album isYou Must Believe in Spring”.

Sunday at the Village Vanguard “,  (Full Album) released in 1961, is considered to be one of the best live jazz recordings of all time. Evans was accompanied by bassist Scott LaFaro and drummer Paul Motian. This outstanding live performance spotlights the alchemy between the three musicians, a single homogenous musical thought expressing one voice, but from three distinctive points of view. This was a real conversation, not the normal conversation between musicians where each one plays through the chord changes via improvisation to end up at the same place at the same time. Evans had a democratic vision of cooperation within his trio where each member performed with perfect empathy and telepathy, which was rare among musicians at that time. I fully understand why this live jazz performance is considered as one of the best, ever. You will, too.

Enjoy this trackAlice in Wonderland from the album”

Buy Bill Evans music : https://www.amazon.com/Bill-Evans/e/B000AP5G22

More information about Bill, his life and music: https://billevanswebpages.com/

My thanks to William Price King for bringing us the music of Bill Evans thank you too from us both for tuning in.

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Buy William’s music ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Connect with William

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/wpkofficial
Regular Venuehttp://cave-wilson.com/ 

You can find all of the Music Column series in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-music-column/

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you have enjoyed the music…thanks William and Sally.

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Music Column with William Price King with American jazz-rock guitarist and composer John Scofield


Welcome to a new season of the Music Column with jazz musician, composer and singer William Price King.

American jazz-rock guitarist and composer John Scofield

About John Scofield from his official website

John Scofield’s guitar work has influenced jazz since the late 70’s and is going strong today. Possessor of a very distinctive sound and stylistic diversity, Scofield is a masterful jazz improviser whose music generally falls somewhere between post-bop, funk edged jazz, and R & B.

Born in Ohio and raised in suburban Connecticut, Scofield took up the guitar at age 11, inspired by both rock and blues players. He attended Berklee College of Music in Boston. After a debut recording with Gerry Mulligan and Chet Baker, Scofield was a member of the Billy Cobham-George Duke band for two years. In 1977 he recorded with Charles Mingus, and joined the Gary Burton quartet. He began his international career as a bandleader and recording artist in 1978. From 1982–1985, Scofield toured and recorded with Miles Davis. His Davis stint placed him firmly in the foreground of jazz consciousness as a player and composer.

Since that time he has prominently led his own groups in the international Jazz scene, recorded over 30 albums as a leader (many already classics) including collaborations with contemporary favorites like Pat Metheny, Charlie Haden, Eddie Harris, Medeski, Martin & Wood, Bill Frisell, Brad Mehldau, Mavis Staples, Government Mule, Jack DeJohnette, Joe Lovano and Phil Lesh. He’s played and recorded with Tony Williams, Jim Hall, Ron Carter, Herbie Hancock, Joe Henderson, Dave Holland, Terumasa Hino among many jazz legends. Throughout his career Scofield has punctuated his traditional jazz offerings with funk-oriented electric music. All along, the guitarist has kept an open musical mind.

Touring the world approximately 200 days per year with his own groups, he is an Adjunct Professor of Music at New York University, a husband, and father of two.”

Let’s listen to some of John Scofield’s music

The John Scofield Band released “Überjam” in 2002 on Verve Records. Überjam is an album with many different styles: jazz fusion, jazz-funk, and acid-jazz – in other words, pure fusion. It was produced by John Scofield and Jason Olaine. The music on this album is abstract, intellectual, funky, and spontaneous, and highlights Scofield’s fascination with new electronic music.

“Scorched” was commissioned by the Society of Friends and Patrons of the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra in 2002. Mark-Anthony Turnage recomposed and orchestrated original compositions by Scofield for symphony orchestra and big band, thus the title SCOfield ORCHstratED. Scofield worked on the project with John Patitucci on electric bass and Peter Erskine on drums. This can be called orchestral jazz, a hybrid, but also comes across as contemporary classical music. The arrangements are done with dense but agile harmonic movement and crisp rhythmic changes. The big band and orchestra alternate with Scofield’s trio (Patitucci and Erskine) instead of playing together. “Scorched” was nominated for a Grammy Award in 2004 for ‘Best Classical Crossover Album’.

“I Don’t Need No Doctor”, from the album “That’s What I Say: John Scofield Plays the Music of Ray Charles” (2005), is an R&B song written by Nick Ashford, Valerie Simpson, and Jo Armstead. Scofield recorded this album as a tribute to Ray Charles featuring well-known guest artists Dr. John, Mavis Staples (The Staple Sisters), Aaron Neville, and John Mayer who does an exquisite job on “I Don’t Need No Doctor”. This was Scofield’s first time working with vocals and the outcome is an admirable effort, fluctuating between instrumental soul-jazz and vocal soul.

“Wayfaring Strange” is from the album “Country of Old Men” (2016) and is a well-known American folk and gospel song. The title of this album was taken from the novel “No Country for Old Men” as a joke about Scofield’s age. The album features jazz versions of country music songs and spotlights Scofield’s love for the blues while highlighting his ability to build, harmonically, on ‘tension and release’ with perfect timing which is evident in his New Orleans style version of “Wayfaring Stranger”. “Country For Old Men” won the Grammy Award for ‘Best Jazz Instrumental Album’ in 2017.

Sources: Bio: http://www.johnscofield.com/
Tour Dates: http://www.johnscofield.com/tour/
Buy John Scofield Music: https://www.amazon.com/John-Scofield/e/B000APXOZI
YouTube: John Scofield

My thanks to William Price King for bringing us the music of John Scofield and I for one will be exploring his music further.. thank you too from us both for tuning in.

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Buy William’s music ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Connect with William

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/wpkofficial
Regular Venuehttp://cave-wilson.com/ 

You can find all of the Music Column series in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-music-column/