Smorgasbord Laughter Lines – Guest Comedians D.G. Kaye and Eric and Joy Lennick.


I have two guest comedians today…some funnies that were spotted by D.G. Kaye Writer Blog and Eric and Joy Lennick Amazon have contributed the joke..

First some funnies from Debby Gies…

D. G. Kaye – Buy: http://www.amazon.com/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO
Blog: http://www.dgkayewriter.com – Goodreads: D.G. Kaye on Goodreads

And to finish a limerick from Eric Lennick

“FROZEN REVENGE”

A lady whose name was Theresa
shut her old man in the freezer.
By playing the field…
he got himself killed,
and he’s now with the sprouts and the pizza.”

Joy Lennick, Buy: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Joy-Lennick/e/B00J05CJLY/
Blog: https://joylennick.wordpress.com/

I hope you have enjoyed these funnies and if you have any you would like to contribute, new material is always welcome… send your favourite jokes to sally.cronin@moyhill.com and get a mention for your books and blog too..

Advertisements

Smorgasbord Blog Sitting Special – Aging and Wisdom – The New Perennial Age of Women by D.G. Kaye


A welcome back to to Debby Gies with one of the posts from her archives to share with us today.  When this post appeared last year it was met with rave reviews and for weeks on Facebook we were all announcing to the world our new status.. A Perennial Woman..

Perennial years

Aging and Wisdom – The New Perennial Age of Women by D.G. Kaye

How many times have we said we don’t feel or look our age? When did middle-age sneak into our lives? Where did the years go?

I’m sure we’ve all begged the answers to those questions once or twice as we women approach our ‘Perennial’ years.

What comes to mind when women use the terms ‘the new 40 or 50′, even 60 or 70? Here’s a clue: it encompasses so much more than just looks.

In my opinion, looks have changed since the last generation, without discounting so many other changes that have occurred through the decades to empower women. Women in their 40s and 50s look much younger than those from decades past. I’m not referring to the advent of cosmetic surgery, but when I look back on decades past, I notice some interesting hairdos and fashion statements. Looking back at the women in my own family and even movie stars with the styles of yesteryear, it’s not hard for me to compare a woman of today in her 40s or 50s appearing younger looking than those before us at the same age. Was it the hairstyles, a more sedentary lifestyle which gave the impression a women in her 30s back when of 30 or 40 years ago looked similar in age to women now in their 40s or 50s?

Back in those days, women didn’t lead lifestyles like they do now, some with powerful jobs, being the bigger bread winner, many working what used to be considered, jobs for only men, or raising a family while carrying a job. “We’ve come a long way baby,” as the old cigarette ad used to say. (Am I giving away my age?)

I have to laugh at the many times me and my sister would bring up the subject of our dreaded childhood weekends we were forced to spend at our paternal grandparents’ house. We’d remark to one another about how even when we were small, our grandmother looked like . . . well, a grandmother. We only envision her old from as far back as we can remember. But lol, I digress.

What made me write this post on women then and now was prompted by a conversation I had on the weekend with one of my sister-in-laws. She shared a topic of discussion that came up between her and her yoga teacher. Her teacher had referred to women in the age group of 40s and 50s as ‘perennials’. Have any of you heard this term used before? I haven’t. But I love it.

I’ve heard of some more unflattering terms such as menopausal, even cougars, but not perennials.

According to the yoga teacher’s preferred term, perennial, it represents this age category because many women are reaching their full potential, ‘in full bloom’ as they enter their 40s and 50s. This age bracket is where many women enter new phases of life such as: the empty nest stage where their kids are finally moving out or getting married, making new lives for themselves or raising families. This is a time where women begin to re-evaluate their accomplishments and desires and come to realize they want to do things that either they may not have thought about doing when they were younger, or were too busy raising their families or building careers, choosing to put their own desires on hold.

I can identify with this wonderful choice of word, perennial, representing a time period of continuation of our evolving. We are still evolving and learning and doing. Every year we bloom with more knowledge from our experiences and eventually, the new bloom leads to desires of the ‘me time’. A time for us to focus on the things we enjoy whether it be travel, new hobbies, furthering our education, or even writing books.

So much can apply to this ‘new age’. The possibilities are endless if we allow ourselves the entitlement to flourish and bloom to complete ourselves for ourselves.

I absolutely adore the term ‘perennial’ and it does sound so much better than ‘the change’. In fact, there may even be a book from me down the road on the subject.

How do you feel about the term ‘perennial’?

I am sure that Debby would love to hear your answer and receive your feedback, and I look forward to reading both on my return tomorrow.  Thanks to Debby for another wonderful post.

About D.G. Kaye

Debby Gies is a Canadian nonfiction/memoir author who writes under the pen name of D.G. Kaye. She was born, raised, and resides in Toronto, Canada. Kaye writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

D.G. writes to inspire others. Her writing encompasses stories taken from events she encountered in her own life, and she shares the lessons taken from them. Her sunny outlook on life developed from learning to overcome challenges in her life, and finding the upside from those situations, while practicing gratitude for all the positives.

When Kaye isn’t writing intimate memoirs, she brings her natural sense of humor into her other works. She loves to laugh and self- medicate with a daily dose of humor.
I love to tell stories that have lessons in them, and hope to empower others by sharing my own experiences. I write raw and honest about my own experiences, hoping through my writing, that others can relate and find that there is always a choice to move from a negative space, and look for the positive.

Quotes:
“Live Laugh Love . . . And Don’t Forget to Breathe!”

                 “For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

When I’m not writing, I’m reading or quite possibly looking after some mundane thing in life. It’s also possible I may be on a secret getaway trip, as that is my passion—traveling.

This is D.G. Kaye’s latest release in December 2017.

About Twenty Years: After “I Do”.

May/December memoirs.

In this personal accounting, D.G. Kaye shares the insights and wisdom she has accrued through twenty years of keeping her marriage strong and thriving despite the everyday changes and challenges of aging. Kaye reveals how a little creative planning, acceptance, and unconditional love can create a bond no obstacle will break. Kaye’s stories are informative, inspiring, and a testament to love eclipsing all when two people understand, respect, and honor their vows. She adds that a daily sprinkling of laughter is a staple in nourishing a healthy marriage.

Twenty years began with a promise. As Kaye recounts what transpired within that time, she shows that true love has no limits, even when one spouse ages ahead of the other.

Here is one of the recent reviews for the book

“Twenty Years After I Do” is a love story, all the more compelling because it is true. Kaye shines a light under the table, exposing those things many of us prefer to keep out of sight. For all of the unpleasant topics in the book, this is not a depressing journey. She doesn’t say that love concours all, but she shows us, through her own life, that it so often does. More accurately, she explains that love will help us face whatever outcome life gives us.

The author is one of the decreasing number of people who understand that marriage is “ti deathl do us part.” Staying together is not optional, it’s not a choice to be made. That choice was made with the speaking of the words, “I Do.” She shows us that love and humor are tools we can use to overcome obstacles we would have thought unsurmountable.

This is a good read. Reading it has made me feel like I’ve made a friend.
 

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077V386TL

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B077V386TL

Other books by D.G. Kaye

51ipqxbodml-_uy250_crophave-bags-will-travel

Read all the reviews and buy the books: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO

More reviews and follow Debby on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/dgkaye

Connect to Debby Gies

Blog: http://www.dgkayewriter.com
About me: http://www.wiseintro.co/dgkaye7
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/@pokercubster (yes there’s a story)
Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/dgkaye7
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dgkaye
Google: http://www.google.com/+DebbyDGKayeGies
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dgkaye
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dgkaye7

Thanks again to Debby for sharing this very popular post from her archives.

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – Life is Short – Buy the Shoes! by D.G. Kaye


Welcome back to the second of post from the archives of Debby Gies...this post amused me as well as inspired a recent purchase – yes I am a shoes hoarder too….and Debby is absolutely right. Life is too short!

High heel shoes

“Life is short—buy the shoes.” This is a small sentence, although packed with some good advice. I took a little writing journal with me on my recent vacation and this quote was the title of the journal.

The cover had a pretty caricature of a girl, happily skipping among flowers while wearing pink stilettos, which captured my attention. Anybody who knows me, knows how much I love shoes, so buying the journal was a no brainer for me.

I found the cute little journal while looking around in the stationery section of a gift store in Arizona. Every time I picked it up, it reminded me not to hem and haw over little decisions in life which we tend to let grow so grand sometimes in our thoughts. And I bought it.

With so much sickness and evil in the world, we shouldn’t be burdening ourselves with petty worries. We have to remember to have gratitude in the little moments that make us feel happy.

If we come across some item that makes us feel good and brings us a smile then I say indulge. You like it, you buy it! If it doesn’t cut into your life savings or living budget, and it brings you joy, then go for it!

“Sometimes it’s the little things in life that bring us pleasure and can fill a dark day with sunnier skies.”

Life’s too short, found in a storefront window in Sedona, Arizona

©D.G. Kaye 2015

D.G. Kaye writes memoirs and non-fiction including The Words We Carry. The book explores the damage that can be done to our self-esteem with unguarded or unkind words when we are young.

About Words We Carry

“I have been a great critic of myself for most of my life, and I was darned good at it, deflating my own ego without the help of anyone else.”

What do our shopping habits, high-heeled shoes, and big hair have to do with how we perceive ourselves? Do the slights we endured when we were young affect how we choose our relationships now?
D.G. takes us on a journey, unlocking the hurts of the past by identifying situations that hindered her own self-esteem. Her anecdotes and confessions demonstrate how the hurtful events in our lives linger and set the tone for how we value our own self-worth.
Words We Carry is a raw, personal accounting of how the author overcame the demons of low self-esteem with the determination to learn to love herself.

One of the recent reviews for the book

As a writer, I have immense respect for fellow writers who share their personal journeys and challenges with the sole intent to help ease the burdens of others. In Words We Carry: Essays of Obsession and Self-Esteem, Author D.G. Kaye not only shares her very personal journey to self-worth, she does so with an enlightened, grateful heart. Personally, I loved Kaye’s candid, engaging, and often times humourous writing style. This is an incredibly personal read and one that offers guided hope and encourages self-reflection.

Our lives are shaped by our experiences; every encounter, every moment holds the capacity to build us or break us. Our resiliency to endure and overcome, in large part, correlates with how we see ourselves, how we value our self-worth. Kaye doesn’t profess to be an expert on this topic; the value of this book lies in the authentic approach in which she shares her personal journey. Our self-esteem and personal acceptance are intrinsic to a life of fulfillment, a life of joy. Our ability to celebrate our unique qualities and embrace our imperfections is not a simple endeavour, but it is possible. Amazing things transpire from this inner peace, and this memoir is a testament to that truth. Kaye brilliantly shares her journey to self-love, her tenacious spirit shines bright, her words are an offering of hope for those who may be struggling to chart their own course. Her approach is genuine, her encouragement sincere. She is in your corner! A highly recommended high-star read!

Read all the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/Words-We-Carry-Obsession-Self-Esteem-ebook/dp/B00OQJGE42

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Words-We-Carry-Obsession-Self-Esteem-ebook/dp/B00OQJGE42

Also by D.G. Kaye

Read the reviews and buy all of D.G. Kaye’s Books: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO

Read more reviews and follow Debby on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7390618.D_G_Kaye

About D.G. Kaye

d-g-kayeDebby Gies is a Canadian nonfiction/memoir author who writes under the pen name of D.G. Kaye. She was born, raised, and resides in Toronto, Canada. Kaye writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

D.G. writes to inspire others. Her writing encompasses stories taken from events she encountered in her own life, and she shares the lessons taken from them. Her sunny outlook on life developed from learning to overcome challenges in her life, and finding the upside from those situations, while practicing gratitude for all the positives.

When Kaye isn’t writing intimate memoirs, she brings her natural sense of humor into her other works. She loves to laugh and self- medicate with a daily dose of humor.
I love to tell stories that have lessons in them, and hope to empower others by sharing my own experiences. I write raw and honest about my own experiences, hoping through my writing, that others can relate and find that there is always a choice to move from a negative space, and look for the positive.

Quotes:
Live Laugh Love . . . And Don’t Forget to Breathe!”

                 “For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

When I’m not writing, I’m reading or quite possibly looking after some mundane thing in life. It’s also possible I may be on a secret getaway trip, as that is my passion—traveling.

Connect to Debby Gies

Blog: http://www.dgkayewriter.com
Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/dgkaye
About me: http://www.wiseintro.co/dgkaye7
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/@pokercubster (yes there’s a story)
Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/dgkaye7
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dgkaye
Google: http://www.google.com/+DebbyDGKayeGies
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dgkaye
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dgkaye7

My thanks to Debby for this inspiring invitation to partake in life’s small pleasures.. and since we are being open about some of these small things that make us happy….. how about putting your secret vice in the comments section…. within reason!!!

 

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #Coloring Books and Life – One Day at a Time by D.G. Kaye


Today begins the start of four archive posts from non-fiction and memoir writer D.G. Kaye known to most of us as Debby Gies. In her first post from 2016, Debby shares the strategy that she adopted to cope with a particularly difficult time when her husband was seriously unwell. As you will read, it was a time to let go of many familiar routines and task but a time to embrace some different, even for a short time each day to allow time to breathe.

breathe

#Coloring Books and Life – One Day at a Time by D.G. Kaye

I have a mantra. It’s been used by many, advised by many, including myself – it’s called ‘One Day at a Time’.

I’ve often preached this saying to others when they’re feeling overwhelmed, as words of wisdom to help lessen their load, but I was usually guilty of not following my own advice – until this past year.

It’s easy for me to pass on words of encouragement, because I’ve always been a builder-upper of others. But when it comes to myself, I know I sometimes have a difficult time taking my own advice. But this year, I learned the meaning behind that phrase.

I’m a bit OCD when it comes to my ‘to do’ list and getting everything accomplished I set out to do in my own self-imposed time restrictions. But when life threw me some frightening curve balls for the better part of the first half of this year, with my husband’s health issues, I had to take heed to my own words or I’d have been swallowed up by the abyss of pressure I put on myself.

Duty called. There was no book writing, I had no time, nor the mental capacity to focus on writing. If I wasn’t running to doctors and hospitals on a daily basis, I was nursemaid to my husband’s needs, and couldn’t concentrate on anything while I worried every minute if he needed meds, food, his legs rubbed, some words of encouragement, or if he was too silent left unattended in another room for more than twenty minutes, or that he may have passed out yet again.

My blogs were written in midnight hours, and blog reading became my escape from the madness, reminding me that I was still part of a community, other than living in the realms of life and death. I learned quickly that I couldn’t make plans for tomorrow, next week, or even think about next year. My life was on hold, and I only had time to do what needed to be done for my husband at any given moment.

My ‘to do’ lists became everything medical – appointments to make, follow up with, chase doctors, and go back and forth from long hospital days and nights. This was when I learned to Let Go. I could no longer worry about my book waiting for me to come back to and all of my self-imposed deadlines to do the things I normally did on a daily basis. I learned to surrender to the moments and let go of letting to dos overwhelm me, and stop dwelling on the things piling up I’d have to catch up on. I learned to accept each day as it came, in gratitude that my husband was alive and that he was my only priority in those moments.

What spurred me to write this post is a coloring book I purchased that caught my eye in a grocery store one day. The pages had beautiful art to color in, but within each picture is an inspirational quote.

Coloring book - breathe quote

Now I’m going to be honest, I failed art in high school. Heck, I could never even stay within the lines in a coloring book, which coincides with my atrocious handwriting. But I was always a writer. I had a lot of creativity in my head – it’s just that my head could never translate to my hand, my creative ideas. This is similar to the way I design my book covers – in my head. Sure I have an artist who makes my covers for this very reason, my lack of art skills. But I come up with what I’d like to see for my covers, and describe them to my artist, who then creates my visions.

Coloring Book quote Live simply

But getting back to the coloring book, when I pull it out, usually late at night, after the computer is shut down, and I’m looking for an hour to relax, I open it to a new page and I’m immediately overwhelmed by the amount of detail there is to fill in. At first glance, I think to myself, Omg, this page will take forever with all those tiny details.

Coloring book quote - I Am

But I developed a strategy. I start in one corner with one color, then decide where in the picture I wish to use the same color. I then move on to a new color and do the same, using color as my guide to the next place to work on. Within 2 hours I realized I’ve completed a page, and I stand back and say, “It’s just like life, one day at a time, one color at a time, and eventually I get there.”

*Coloring book photos from Posh Coloring book by Deborah Muller

©D.G. Kaye July2016

This is D.G. Kaye’s latest release in December 2017.

About Twenty Years: After “I Do”.

May/December memoirs.

In this personal accounting, D.G. Kaye shares the insights and wisdom she has accrued through twenty years of keeping her marriage strong and thriving despite the everyday changes and challenges of aging. Kaye reveals how a little creative planning, acceptance, and unconditional love can create a bond no obstacle will break. Kaye’s stories are informative, inspiring, and a testament to love eclipsing all when two people understand, respect, and honor their vows. She adds that a daily sprinkling of laughter is a staple in nourishing a healthy marriage.

Twenty years began with a promise. As Kaye recounts what transpired within that time, she shows that true love has no limits, even when one spouse ages ahead of the other.

Here is one of the recent reviews for the book

As I closed the last chapter in D. G. Kaye’s latest book, I felt as though I had just had a conversation with a friend about aging and marriage. In Twenty Years After I Do, Debby reflects on love and changes through the aging process, as her subtitle suggests.

My own husband is slightly younger than I, but I could relate to the author’s personal experience in dealing with her mate’s hearing loss, illness and the challenges of retirement. The author does not sugar coat problems, but readers can expect down-to-earth solutions in this combination memoir/self-help book. Indeed, she affirms, marriage is a like a plant that needs feeding, nurturing, and caring so it will “thrive and continue to bloom.”

Writer Debby advises from a place of deep affection. It is obvious she has married her best friend, one who dubs her variously as Cubby, Cub, and Deb, depending on the circumstances. And yes, couples will fight, she admits, but the partners must learn to fight fair. Her magnanimous nature comes through in this startling statement: “Just because I’m not talking to him doesn’t mean I won’t cook him dinner.” (81)

The author’s early years with a narcissistic mother have left an imprint on all her relationships, including the supreme one with her beloved husband Gordon, twenty years her senior. Yet, in this 108-page book she has translated life lessons from her potentially crippling childhood into the wisdom of happily married life.

Her secret? This author/marriage partner has made a study of her husband, not as a scientific specimen, but as the man she loves body, soul, and spirit.

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077V386TL

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B077V386TL

Other books by D.G. Kaye

51ipqxbodml-_uy250_crophave-bags-will-travel

 

Read all the reviews and buy the books: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO

More reviews and follow Debby on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/dgkaye

About D.G. Kaye

d-g-kayeDebby Gies is a Canadian nonfiction/memoir author who writes under the pen name of D.G. Kaye. She was born, raised, and resides in Toronto, Canada. Kaye writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

D.G. writes to inspire others. Her writing encompasses stories taken from events she encountered in her own life, and she shares the lessons taken from them. Her sunny outlook on life developed from learning to overcome challenges in her life, and finding the upside from those situations, while practicing gratitude for all the positives.

When Kaye isn’t writing intimate memoirs, she brings her natural sense of humor into her other works. She loves to laugh and self- medicate with a daily dose of humor.
I love to tell stories that have lessons in them, and hope to empower others by sharing my own experiences. I write raw and honest about my own experiences, hoping through my writing, that others can relate and find that there is always a choice to move from a negative space, and look for the positive.

Quotes:
“Live Laugh Love . . . And Don’t Forget to Breathe!”

                 “For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

When I’m not writing, I’m reading or quite possibly looking after some mundane thing in life. It’s also possible I may be on a secret getaway trip, as that is my passion—traveling.

Connect to Debby Gies

Blog: http://www.dgkayewriter.com
Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/dgkaye
About me: http://www.wiseintro.co/dgkaye7
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/@pokercubster (yes there’s a story)
Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/dgkaye7
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dgkaye
Google: http://www.google.com/+DebbyDGKayeGies
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dgkaye
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dgkaye7

Smorgasbord Christmas Posts from Your Archives- 26 Affordable and Practical #Gift Giving Ideas for the #Holiday Season by D.G. Kaye


Delighted to share a post from the Christmas Archives of D.G. Kaye.. Debby Gies. This is probably one of the most expensive times of the year and when you have an extended family, finding presents and budgeting for them takes creativity.. Debby has some great ideas to make every dollar, euro or pound count.

26 Affordable and Practical #Gift Giving Ideas for the #Holiday Season by D.G. Kaye

The holiday season is fast approaching, and once again people are picking their brains about what gifts to buy for friends and loved ones.

I’ve always tried to tailor my gifts specifically to what the receiver would like and could use and/or appreciate, in hopes that my gift wouldn’t be the one ending up collecting dust on a shelf or re-packaged for re-gifting. But it’s still sometimes difficult to pinpoint exactly what the perfect gift could be for someone, and, often times, there might be too much cost to purchase a particular gift, which sometimes leaves us feeling somewhat inadequate with what we’ve chosen to give, especially for those hard to buy for people who already have everything they want. Sure, it’s the thought that counts, but sometimes people don’t think that way, and sometimes our budgets don’t allow us to spend on some items what we’d really like to give.

So today I’m going to share some great ideas for gift giving for both children and adults. Below are some ideas from low cost to no cost that you can give with confidence and know they will be well received.

Have you ever noticed children at a Christmas gathering opening one gift after another, barely taking in the excitement of one gift before they put it aside to open the next one? Have you ever noticed how much kids love to do arts and crafts to keep their busy little hands and minds occupied? This is why crafts make great gifts for kids. Maybe it’s the writer in me, but I like to buy gifts for kids that help to educate them and help to build their creativity.

Here’s a handy list of things you can buy for kids that won’t break the bank:

  • Books – books that entertain while teaching kids to count or learn the alphabet, colors, names of animals, and of course, any stories to do with kindness that can be understood at their level.
  • Coloring books and crayons, pencil crayons, magic markers, an easel to draw on, colored sand art, water paints and brushes, tissue paper for paper mache art, personal diaries, notebooks, stamp art, stencil art, yarn for sewing projects
  • Construction paper, pipe cleaners, glitter glue, and sticker books
  • Lego
  • Playdoh
  • Ebooks of children’s stories can be gifted and loaded to a parent’s ereader or get a kindle for kids for their own books

What to buy the person who seems to have everything:

  • Books
  • Gift certificate from: a bookstore, their favorite store, a restaurant they frequent, a coffee house, a home improvement store, a transit pass, movie theater or a sporting event
  • A membership to a club
  • A kindle with some ebooks downloaded to it
  • A season paid of gardening
  • A subscription paid for a year to a magazine
  • Donate for a few meals to a homeless charity in their name
  • Donate to any charity in their name

And what can you give that won’t cost you anything but some of your time? Make up some coupons and offer loved ones:

  • Free babysitting
  • Free rides to drop off and pick up
  • Housesitting
  • Snow Shoveling
  • Companion time
  • Reading time for an elderly person
  • Help around the house
  • Make a few dinners
  • Help decorate and take down decorations after the holidays
  • Volunteer services
  • Baked goods
  • Something homemade

These are just a few of so many things we can give. Our imaginations are limitless when we think about what a particular person could really use and appreciate. And don’t forget, there is nothing more personal than any gift from the heart.

Happy Holidays!

©D.G. Kaye

Brand new release on December 1st.

About Twenty Years: After “I Do”.

May/December memoirs.

In this personal accounting, D.G. Kaye shares the insights and wisdom she has accrued through twenty years of keeping her marriage strong and thriving despite the everyday changes and challenges of aging. Kaye reveals how a little creative planning, acceptance, and unconditional love can create a bond no obstacle will break. Kaye’s stories are informative, inspiring, and a testament to love eclipsing all when two people understand, respect, and honor their vows. She adds that a daily sprinkling of laughter is a staple in nourishing a healthy marriage.

Twenty years began with a promise. As Kaye recounts what transpired within that time, she shows that true love has no limits, even when one spouse ages ahead of the other.

This early review for one of the Beta Readers.

“Twenty Years: After “I Do” shows not only newly married couples but also those in the middle of their lives how to navigate companionship challenges and show love and kindness to their partners, handling life together gracefully and in harmony.

Multibook self-help author D.G. Kaye demonstrates, using examples from her own marriage, how to really commit to a relationship—till death do us part.” – Doris-Maria Heilmann, 111 Publishing

The book is now available: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077V386TL

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B077V386TL

Other books by D.G. Kaye

51ipqxbodml-_uy250_crophave-bags-will-travel

Here is my own review for Words We Carry

on November 9, 2017

Words We Carry is packed with the accumulated knowledge, wisdom, survival tips and strategies from someone who went through difficult and unhappy childhood and teen years.

I think it is fair to say that most of us are less than confident about our body shape, and that is particularly tough when you can no longer use the excuse of puppy fat, and your friends are heading out in slinky black dresses and high-heeled shoes.

Unfortunately, not all mothers are born with the nurturing gene and as soon as you become competition, there is an opportunity to reinforce your lack of self-esteem with carefully chosen and cutting words. I would like to think that the experiences that D.G. Kaye describes were rare, but I am afraid that after counselling women on their health and weight for twenty years, the story is very familiar.

Those harmful words from those who are supposed to love us, are the ones we carry throughout our lifetime, unless we can find a way to dilute their power and replace them with affirmations of a much more positive nature.

D.G. Kaye describes her strategies to claim her own identity, build her self-esteem and evolve from the ugly duckling that she had been made to feel she was, into a swan. This involved a makeover in a number of departments, including wearing high heels at all times and over every terrain, and standing out from the crowd with her now signature titian hair colour. She also developed a healthy, outgoing personality and independence that led her to discover groups of people who accepted and embraced her as a friend.

In the second section of the book Kaye looks at the impact this early negative conditioning had on her relationships, including romances with older men whose different approach to dating and expectations provided a more secure environment. Unfortunately, having entered one serious and long-term relationship, echoes of the verbal abuse that she received as a child and teenager, threatened to undo all the hard work that she had accomplished. Thankfully she went on to find happiness and empowerment with someone who appreciates all that she has become.

Kaye looks at issues such as the difference between Alone vs. Lonely, Negativity and Self-Worth, Forming Healthier Relationships, and importantly Exposing our Personality Through the Internet. All the chapters provide commonsense strategies to overcome a lack of self-confidence, and I do think that women and men in their 50s and 60s, will definitely be able to draw parallels to Kaye’s own experiences.

Whilst I recommend this memoir/self-help book to men and women of my age, I also think that it should be read by all mothers whose daughters are heading into their teens and beyond. It might just remind them of how fragile their child is when about to face the outside world, and that there are enough external challenges to be overcome, without encountering them in the place they should feel safe.

It is also a book for young women who are struggling with weight issues and those who feel that they are not as attractive as their friends, or who feel that they are somehow going through something never experienced before.

There is no reason to reinvent the wheel. By reading this they might take strength in knowing that this is an age old problem, and that they can change the narrative and write their own story.

Read all the reviews and buy the books: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO

More reviews and follow Debby on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/dgkaye

About D.G. Kaye

d-g-kayeDebby Gies is a Canadian nonfiction/memoir author who writes under the pen name of D.G. Kaye. She was born, raised, and resides in Toronto, Canada. Kaye writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

D.G. writes to inspire others. Her writing encompasses stories taken from events she encountered in her own life, and she shares the lessons taken from them. Her sunny outlook on life developed from learning to overcome challenges in her life, and finding the upside from those situations, while practicing gratitude for all the positives.

When Kaye isn’t writing intimate memoirs, she brings her natural sense of humor into her other works. She loves to laugh and self- medicate with a daily dose of humor.
I love to tell stories that have lessons in them, and hope to empower others by sharing my own experiences. I write raw and honest about my own experiences, hoping through my writing, that others can relate and find that there is always a choice to move from a negative space, and look for the positive.

Quotes:
   “Live Laugh Love . . . And Don’t Forget to Breathe!”

                 “For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

When I’m not writing, I’m reading or quite possibly looking after some mundane thing in life. It’s also possible I may be on a secret getaway trip, as that is my passion—traveling.

Connect to Debby Gies

Blog: http://www.dgkayewriter.com
Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/dgkaye
About me: http://www.wiseintro.co/dgkaye7
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/@pokercubster (yes there’s a story)
Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/dgkaye7
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dgkaye
Google: http://www.google.com/+DebbyDGKayeGies
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dgkaye
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/dgkaye7

Don’t forget, if you have some posts in your Christmas archives to share to a new audience them please send one or two to me at sally.cronin@moyhill.com

Thanks for dropping by…

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Sally’s Book Reviews – Words We Carry by D.G.Kaye


This week I have been reading The Words We Carry by D.G. Kaye and would like to share my thoughts with you on the book.

About Words We Carry

“I have been a great critic of myself for most of my life, and I was darned good at it, deflating my own ego without the help of anyone else.”

What do our shopping habits, high-heeled shoes, and big hair have to do with how we perceive ourselves? Do the slights we endured when we were young affect how we choose our relationships now?

D.G. takes us on a journey, unlocking the hurts of the past by identifying situations that hindered her own self-esteem. Her anecdotes and confessions demonstrate how the hurtful events in our lives linger and set the tone for how we value our own self-worth.
Words We Carry is a raw, personal accounting of how the author overcame the demons of low self-esteem with the determination to learn to love herself.

My review for Words We Carry.

Words We Carry is packed with the accumulated knowledge, wisdom, survival tips and strategies from someone who went through difficult and unhappy childhood and teen years.

I think it is fair to say that most of us are less than confident about our body shape, and that is particularly tough when you can no longer use the excuse of puppy fat, and your friends are heading out in slinky black dresses and high-heeled shoes.

Unfortunately, not all mothers are born with the nurturing gene and as soon as you become competition, there is an opportunity to reinforce your lack of self-esteem with carefully chosen and cutting words.  I would like to think that the experiences that D.G. Kaye describes were rare, but I am afraid that after counselling women on their health and weight for twenty years, the story is very familiar.

Those harmful words from those who are supposed to love us, are the ones we carry throughout our lifetime, unless we can find a way to dilute their power and replace them with affirmations of a much more positive nature.

D.G. Kaye describes her strategies to claim her own identity, build her self-esteem and evolve from the ugly duckling that she had been made to feel she was, into a swan. This involved a makeover in a number of departments, including wearing high heels at all times and over every terrain, and standing out from the crowd with her now signature titian hair colour. She also developed a healthy, outgoing personality and independence that led her to discover groups of people who accepted and embraced her as a friend.

In the second section of the book Kaye looks at the impact this early negative conditioning had on her relationships, including romances with older men whose different approach to dating and expectations provided a more secure environment. Unfortunately, having entered one serious and long-term relationship, echoes of the verbal abuse that she received as a child and teenager, threatened to undo all the hard work that she had accomplished. Thankfully she went on to find happiness and empowerment with someone who appreciates all that she has become.

Kaye looks at issues such as the difference between Alone vs. Lonely, Negativity and Self-Worth, Forming Healthier Relationships, and importantly Exposing our Personality Through the Internet. All the chapters provide commonsense strategies to overcome a lack of self-confidence, and I do think that women and men in their 50s and 60s, will definitely be able to draw parallels to Kaye’s own experiences.

Whilst I recommend this memoir/self-help book to men and women of my age, I also think that it should be read by all mothers whose daughters are heading into their teens and beyond. It might just remind them of how fragile their child is when about to face the outside world, and that there are enough external challenges to be overcome, without encountering them in the place they should feel safe.

It is also a book for young women who are struggling with weight issues and those who feel that they are not as attractive as their friends, or who feel that they are somehow going through something never experienced before.

There is no reason to reinvent the wheel. By reading this they might take strength in knowing that this is an age old problem, and that they can change the narrative and write their own story.

Read all the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/Words-We-Carry-Obsession-Self-Esteem-ebook/dp/B00OQJGE42

and Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Words-We-Carry-Obsession-Self-Esteem-ebook/dp/B00OQJGE42

Also by D.G. Kaye

Read the reviews and buy all of D.G. Kaye’s Books: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO

Read more reviews and follow Debby on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7390618.D_G_Kaye

Connect to D.G. Kaye through her website.https://www.dgkayewriter.com

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you will head over to Amazon and read the reviews and buy the books. Thanks Sally

 

Smorgasbord Reblog – Writing as Therapy – Releasing our thoughts on paper by D.G. Kaye


Relationship expert Debby Gies – D.G. Kaye shares her thoughts on the therapeutic benefits of writing in any form that allows you to release and express your thoughts and emotions.

Writing as Therapy – Releasing our thoughts on paper by D.G.Kaye

We use our writing to convey our thoughts, ideas, and to tell stories. For many of us, writing is a personal outlet to communicate our feelings and opinions. Writing can be a therapeutic exercise, enabling us to release what may be stifling our well-being, offering us freedom to release our locked up emotions onto paper.

An abundance of articles and books have been written on helpful methods to release our inner turmoil. Using methods such as writing a letter to ourselves or directly to someone whom we feel we need to express our thoughts and feelings about circumstances that plague us internally is an excellent release. I’ve used this method on several occasions, beginning in my childhood, going straight into my adult years before I even realized the value of the therapeutic benefits.

Many of us have issues with confronting people with our personal feelings and need an outlet to release these feelings within, whether they be feelings of angst or affection. As a child growing up in a dysfunctional home environment, I often wanted to confront my mother about my feelings and opinions, but never mustered the courage to do so.

I began writing letters to her. After writing each one of them, I felt as though a great burden had been lifted off of my sub-conscience just by getting my feelings out of my head and onto the paper. I never sent her any of them.

Whether we are introverts or extroverts, at times, we all harbor thoughts that plague us that would serve us better if we could release them. Our minds sometimes become clouded with unanswered questions, doubts, and feelings of neglect from bruised emotions. When we don’t have an outlet or ears for us to vent to, or often, the courage to confront, writing becomes the savior of our soul.

Read the rest of this thought provoking post: https://dgkayewriter.com/writing-therapy-releasing-thoughts-paper

Books by D.G. Kaye

One of the recent reviews for Words We Carry.

The dysfunctional childhood suffered by author D.G Kaye has left her with great insight into the human condition, which she writes about with much accumulated wisdom in her inspirational non-fiction book ‘Words We Carry’. We read how parents, teachers, and events in our childhood shape the adults that we become. I suffered quite a few similar events in my own childhood that the author did, and found the whole book excellent and eerily uncanny to my own life experiences.

Ms Kaye believes, just as I do, that we should put on a smile, think positive thoughts, and dress to please ourselves and not others. It doesn’t matter if we are not blessed with outward beauty, a happy and friendly demeanour will shine through and attract new friends. Beauty is as beauty does; nobody gets pleasure from being around a miserable complainer, even though they may be the best looking person for miles around.
By the time the reader reaches the last page, they would have the recipe in their hands to give their self-esteem a huge boost. Over the years I have learned to feel comfortable in my own skin, just like the author had to, and to ignore or walk away from people whose only aim in life was to make disparaging comments in order to make me feel bad about myself.

 

Read the reviews and buy all of D.G. Kaye’s Books: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO

Read more reviews and follow Debby on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7390618.D_G_Kaye

 

Connect to D.G. Kaye through her website.https://www.dgkayewriter.com

I hope that you will head over and read the full post and leave your comments for Debby there. Thanks Sally

 

Smorgasbord Christmas Party – Guest author D. G. Kaye with Childhood Christmas Wishes and My First Biggest Tree


christmas partyToday’s guest is no stranger to many of you as Debby Gies, author D.G. Kaye speeds through the Internet like a express train, promoting all of us with elegance and sincere friendship. She is a terrific supporter of Indie authors and you will find interviews, reviews and posts on life at http://www.dgkayewriter.com

Recently Debby published a poignant and thought provoking memoir titled P.S. I Forgive You, about her turbulent relationship with her mother that echoed down the years even after her death. Of course there have been some great reviews and I will tell you more about the book later.

First however, I will hand you over to Debby…..

D.G. Kaye AuthorChildhood Christmas Wishes and My First Biggest Tree by D.G. Kaye

As each December approached, I’d take in the views of the glorious glow of Christmas lights and decorations sprouted everywhere, from the street light posts to the homes we’d pass while driving by them, sparkling in all their glory. I was a child and wanted so badly to be part of Christmas.

Coming from a family that didn’t practice much of religion, and having Orthodox Jewish grandparents on my paternal side, didn’t afford me the luxury of having a Christmas tree. This didn’t mean that I didn’t love Christmas and all special festivities I’d witnessed on TV and from visiting friend’s homes who celebrated. I envied the kids who spent fun times with their families, doing traditional holiday things such as wrapping presents, singing carols and most especially, decorating the tree. Oh how I longed to have a bright and sparkly Christmas tree in my home.

When I was very young I didn’t understand why I couldn’t be a part of the festive season, and nobody explained religion to me, other than being told by my grandparents that Jews don’t celebrate that holiday. I’d remembered hearing snippets of memories my mother had mentioned in passing about her lack of Christmas festivities in her own childhood because they were poor, and even though her mother loved Christmas, they didn’t celebrate it because my maternal grandfather was Jewish. I felt empty inside. I felt trapped and confused wondering what kind of religion was I part of where we didn’t celebrate the universal Christmas, and the holidays we did celebrate were not near as much fun.

I wanted to be a part of a family celebration, and other than seeing the menorah lit at my grandparents’ house or gathering there for a compulsory Passover dinner, which consisted of what felt like hours of sitting at the Seder table listening to Hebrew prayers, we didn’t celebrate anything. This didn’t quench my fascination and longing to celebrate with loved ones, nor did I feel any bonding; something I craved much of as a child.

I wanted to wrap up shiny presents and give them to people I loved. I wanted to give gifts even more than I wanted to receive them. I wanted to sing to Christmas songs and wake up Christmas day and run to the tree and open presents with my family.

When I turned eleven, my excitement for Christmas had only heightened. I decided that I just had to be a part of the tradition, if only in a small way. So I began my own ritual.
I was the eldest of four—the mother hen of my siblings. We were alone together much of our childhoods and I wanted to get them as excited as I was about the Christmas holiday spirit. I saved my allowance and went to the local drug store before Christmas Eve and bought candy and little prizes with the coins I had saved, so that I could fill stockings for them. I told my siblings to hang a sock over the fireplace before they went to bed on Christmas Eve. And I made up little Christmas stories to convince them that Santa loved all children, and told them if they would be good and not fight, Santa would come to our house too.

I filled those stockings for a few years, until the younger ones realized, as they were getting older, that there wasn’t really a Santa. But for those four to five years, I filled their imaginations and stockings, and they believed in the magic of Christmas. Through those years, I wanted a Christmas tree so badly, and I never gave up asking my mother to allow us to have one, to no avail. I even tried to sell her on the idea of getting a Hannukah bush, but that never happened either.

When I moved away from home, still in my teens, I got my first tree. I couldn’t wait for Christmas to come so I could go and buy the biggest tree I could find that would fit in my living room. It was a Scotch Pine, and I didn’t realize just how humongous it was until it ‘thawed’ and drank lots of water, until its branches unfolded to almost eight feet wide! I also wasn’t aware of the potential aftermath of prickly Scotch Pine tiny needles left fallen deep inside my shag carpet, long after Christmas passed.

Excitement filled me as a friend took me to a tree farm and I picked out my first beautiful tree that he happily loaded on his truck and helped me carry inside my small apartment. The thrill continued when I went out the next day to purchase my first sparkly, Christmas ornaments to decorate my very own tree.

First time experiments aren’t always conducted with great expertise, and when we’re young we don’t always seem to worry about repercussions. By the time the season ended, that tree had grown so ginormous and needles were falling at lightning speed. My thick, blue shag carpet had already had many needles buried deep within it and when it came time to throw out the tree, I shuddered at the thought that most needles would have fallen off before I got it to the front door, so I resorted to Plan B.

The 14 x 14 inch window was only a few feet away from the tree. A few pals came over, helped me move the couch away from the window, and somehow we managed to fit that 8 ft x 8 ft tree out the window then retrieved it quickly before the superintendent would see it, and carried the almost bald branches to the garbage room.

I will never forget how happy I was that Christmas Eve, in my own peaceful home, sipping wine with close friends in front of the tree, my first real Christmas Eve. I also learned for future trees, how to anticipate their girth spread, and to never get a Scotch Pine again. LOL

©D.G. Kaye 2016

P.S. I Forgive You by D.G. KayeAbout P.S. I Forgive You.

“I hurt for her. She wasn’t much of a mother, but she was still my mother.”

Confronted with resurfacing feelings of guilt, D.G. Kaye is tormented by her decision to remain estranged from her dying emotionally abusive mother after resolving to banish her years ago, an event she has shared in her book Conflicted Hearts. In P.S. I Forgive You, Kaye takes us on a compelling heartfelt journey as she seeks to understand the roots of her mother’s narcissism, let go of past hurts, and find forgiveness for both her mother and herself.

After struggling for decades to break free, Kaye has severed the unhealthy ties that bound her to her dominating mother—but now Kaye battles new confliction, as the guilt she harbors over her decision only increases as the end of her mother’s life draws near. Kaye once again struggles with her conscience and her feelings of being obligated to return to a painful past she thought she left behind.

And one of the latest reviews.

By Di Amazon Customer on November 22, 2016

I have always felt that something good can always come from something bad and this book clearly proves it. D.G. Kaye is the good that has for some blessed reason come from a horrific childhood. Her mother trumps the fictional mom in Yaya Sisterhood played by Ashley Judd and Ellen Burstyn about a very selfish and narcissistic woman! Whose line in one of the scenes was “Do I look fat?” The sad thing was this book is not writing about a fictional character but a mother who raised an amazing daughter in-spite of her lack of knowing how to love anyone but herself.

I have sent this book to two friends that I feel can relate and need to know that they are not alone and can rise above where they came from and not feel guilt for being angry at their moms.

This book is sad but empowering. Showing that you are not your mothers!

Read all the reviews and BUY the book: P.S. I Forgive You

Also by D.G. Kaye

book-debby-conflicted-hearts251ipqxbodml-_uy250_crop

have-bags-will-travelRead the reviews and buy the books: http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7

Connect with D.G. Kaye

My website:    http://www.dgkayewriter.com
Author Page:   http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7
Goodreads:      http://www.goodreads.com/dgkaye
About me:        http://www.wiseintro.co/dgkaye7
Twitter:            http://www.twitter.com/@pokercubster (yes there’s a story)
Linkedin:          http://www.linkedin.com/in/dgkaye7
Facebook:         http://www.facebook.com/dgkaye
Google:              http://www.google.com/+DebbyDGKayeGies
Instagram:        http://www.instagram.com/dgkaye
Pinterest:          http://www.pinterest.com/dgkaye7

My thanks to Debby for her entertaining story and look forward to your feedback. Thanks Sally

Women’s Health Week Revisited – Heart Health – Connecting the Dots by D.G. Kaye


women

Welcome to the women’s health week revisited and I am so pleased that author D.G. Kaye accepted my invitation to guest post last year. She shared her story about a health issue that could have gone unnoticed at great risk to her life. Thankfully she is now fully recovered and definitely firing on all cylinders.

Connecting the Dots by D.G. Kaye.

It was the tiniest of dots; not much bigger than the size of a pinhead. Most people wouldn’t even have paid it any mind. But I am not most people.

As a girl who has experienced her fair share of health concerns, I made a pact with myself to practice a healthier lifestyle and to become more in-tuned with my body. I wouldn’t categorize myself as a hypochondriac, but because I have been challenged with cervical cancer, glaucoma, and a near fatal diagnosis of Crohn’s disease at the age of forty, my instincts instruct me to pay close attention to any suspicious “red flags” that capture my attention.

I am blessed to have a most wonderful Naturopath who has guided my health for the last decade and he has given me quality living with my Crohn’s. I was also blessed with an angel; my Dermatologist.

I became fascinated by a tiny red dot on my right forearm. Months had gone by and I was puzzled as to why it was still there, so I kept mental note of it every time I glanced it. I just found it strange that this tiny red, transparent speck had taken up residence on my arm and wouldn’t go away. It never hurt, nor itched; it was just there.

I followed my intuition and decided to take action. Ironically, this wasn’t the first call to action. I had previously shown it to my husband’s Dermatologist two months prior, and he offered to burn it off. He was a very old gentleman, and I had mentioned to my husband that I thought this doctor was ready for retirement, as he didn’t see very well. He never used a microscope and seemed always too eager to burn things off. I didn’t feel at peace with the issue so I wanted to seek a second opinion.

I made an appointment with a new Dermatologist who came highly recommended in August 2005. I had to wait until January of the following year to see him. When January rolled around, I went to the appointment and I was told that the doctor I was to see was off sick and that I would be passed over to one of his associates; Dr. Allen (name changed.)

When I met Dr. Allen, I sensed her compassion immediately. She made me feel comfortable with her warm smile and her soft-spoken manner. She informed me that she was going to cut out the dot and send it to pathology; her standard procedure. Dr. Allen stated that she didn’t believe it was anything serious, but as a precaution she wanted to have it analyzed. I was satisfied that I had somebody competent now looking after me. Dr. Allen informed me the results would take about two weeks. Two weeks later, I went back to see her for the results.

The doctor informed me that my results came back negative but that she’d also like to send me for an echo-doppler cardiogram for precaution. She explained that sometimes the reason this type of spot appears is that it may be related to a heart issue. She added that it was a long shot but she would feel better just ruling it out. I looked at her in disbelief as she handed me the referral form but I never questioned her thoroughness. Dr. Allen told me she would call me with the results. I left and went on with my day, not really giving the matter another thought.

The following week I went for the test. The lab technician was friendly and he explained what he’d be doing, to put me at ease. The scan lasted about an hour and through that time, him, and I chatted as though we were old chums. I watched the screen and I was fascinated to see my heart beat with my every breath.

When the test was nearing an hour, the technician suddenly became very quiet. I looked up at the screen and noticed as I breathed; it appeared as though this tonsil-like-looking ball was flicking up and down. Now, I’m no doctor, but I was curious as to what the tonsil-looking thing was that seemed to be suspended from my heart. I suspiciously asked the technician what I was looking at. And then my whole world rocked.

It turned out that I had a rare Myxoma tumour hanging off my valve.

Dr. Allen expressed her sympathy about her suspicion; even though it was a long shot. I thanked her for potentially saving my life. She was so compassionate and she offered to get me in to see one of the biggest heart surgeons at St. Michael’s Hospital, in Toronto.

Within that week, I had gone to meet my soon to be heart surgeon. He was a strappingly handsome man in his early forties. He was also quite curious as to who had sent me for the echo test without a symptom. He explained to me that this tumour was hanging off my valve and if left undetected, it would have eventually dropped off into my lung and embolized, causing sudden death within six months. He also told me that these tumours are asymptomatic, and aren’t generally detected until autopsy; silent killers.

The situation was all so much for me to bear but the one constant that kept me optimistic, was knowing that those tumours were never usually detected and God must have wanted me to live. There were too many coincidences in the finding that wouldn’t allow me to believe anything less than I would survive.

It all happened so quickly. Within the next two weeks, I was scheduled for open-heart surgery.

I got an eye opening view of an operating room as the nurse wheeled me in on a gurney; still fully conscious. I stared at the heart-lung machine that would be sustaining my life, while the good surgeon would hold my heart in his hands.

When I next opened my eyes, the room was very dark and quiet. I thought I felt an angel over my shoulder. I tried to speak with an almost inaudible voice as my lips felt glued together. The nurse sitting behind my shoulder said, “Welcome back Deborah.” I was in and out of consciousness for the rest of the night, but I was alive and I had survived.

©: D.G. Kaye

About D.G. Kaye.

D.G. Kaye Author

D.G. Kaye is a Canadian nonfiction/memoir author. She was born, raised, and resides in Toronto, Canada. Kaye writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

At a young age, D.G. began keeping journals to take notes about her turbulent childhood while growing up as an emotionally neglected child. Tormented with guilt, as she grew older, D.G. was conflicted with the question of whether or not she was to remain obligated to being a faithful daughter, in debt to her narcissistic mother for giving birth to her. Her first book, Conflicted Hearts is a memoir, written about her journey to seek solace from living with guilt.

51c+jfFAgNL._UY250_

D.G.’s writing relates to her experiences in life, and she shares her lessons and ideas she acquired along the way. Kaye’s second book, Meno-What? A memoir, it was written based on her passage through menopause. In that book, she shares her humor and wisdom on what women can expect at that time, adding some of her helpful hints for relief.

51aPdiDt5eL._UY250_

D.G.’s book, Words We Carry focuses around women’s self-esteem issues. She talks about how and why the issues evolve, how she recognized her own issues, and how she overcame her insecurities.

5148dy-kWHL._UY250_

Also a witty writer with great comedic timing, D.G treated those amongst us who are shopaholics and lousy suitcase packers; to her entertaining experiences travelling the globe maximising both the space in her bags and her charm on entering customs. Have Bags Will Travel

51oe2RoB2iL._UY250_

Kaye writes for the woman of all ages. Her writing is easily relatable and her insights about the complexities of being a woman are expressed in her writing.

Read the reviews and BUY the books: www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7

Quotes:

“Live Laugh Love . . . And Don’t Forget to Breathe!”

“For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

Links to buy D.G. Kaye’s books and connect.

Amazon: www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7390618.D_G_Kaye

Social Media
Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/pokercubster
Blog – http://www.dgkayewriter.com
Facebook –   http://www.facebook.com/dgkaye
Google   –   http://www.google.com/+DebbyDGKayeGies

Thank you for dropping in. I know some of you may have read this post last year but it holds a very important message and it would be great if you would re-share on your own networks..

Sally’s Bookstore and Cafe – Book of the Week – Words We Carry by D.G. Kaye

Status


sally's cafe and bookstore

Welcome to the new series where I will be featuring one of the books on the shelves of the cafe and bookstore. There are now over 100 authors and their books, with more added each week as they are promoted in the regular features. To join the other authors you will need to be promoted in those posts first and here is the link for how you can do this.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/book-promotion-smorgasbord-summer-reading/

Book of the Week  kicks off with  Words We Carry by talented non-fiction author and friend to many of us in this blogging community, D.G. Kaye.. also known as the elegant and charistmatic Debby Gies. It so happens that Words We Carry is on offer all of this week.

Special purchase price for Words We Carrywww.smarturl.it/bookwordswecarry

5148dy-kWHL._UY250_First here is D.G Kaye with a few words about the book and I have also selected one or two reviews that the book has gathered from readers.

Words We Carry focuses around women’s self-esteem issues. My essays focus on my own experiences I suffered from my younger years when I was left to feel inadequate and harbored a deep inferiority complex.

Being a memoir, the stories are told through my own struggles, and I share the methods I used to try and conquer my own feelings of low self-esteem.

The stories progress with the impact that the residual damages have on our feelings of insecurity as we carry through into life and relationships.

Women of all ages can relate to this book. Ridicule, nor abuse of any sort should ever be tolerated. My goal when writing was to share and empower not just women, but men too who have endured similar events in their own lives.

Blurb

“I have been a great critic of myself for most of my life, and I was darned good at it, deflating my own ego without the help of anyone else.”

What do our shopping habits, high-heeled shoes, and big hair have to do with how we perceive ourselves? Do the slights we endured when we were young affect how we choose our relationships now?

D.G. takes us on a journey, unlocking the hurts of the past by identifying situations that hindered her own self-esteem. Her anecdotes and confessions demonstrate how the hurtful events in our lives linger and set the tone for how we value our own self-worth.

Words We Carry is a raw, personal accounting of how the author overcame the demons of low self-esteem with the determination to learn to love herself.

A selection of reviews for the book.

I just now finished “Words We Carry” and wanted to come here and write a review while it was still fresh on my mind. But it is actually the kind of book that you will draw from as needed in different circumstances as the occassion may arise.

It is a journey through this author’s life, describing the effect that words have had on her. And it really makes you think twice. It helps you kind of re-evaluate your own life and agree with a lot of the points she brings up and has you feeling not so alone in your own journey.

D.G. Kaye makes you feel as if you are sitting at her kitchen table, just having a friendly conversation about “life” and experiences we have as women. I wish I’d read “Words We Carry” in my twenties! She makes you think that other people think and feel and have had the same experiences as you. She talks about abuse and red flags, jealousy and lonliness. It is empowering and real and was timely for me, since I just quit a job of ten years and am beginning a new one next week!

A great gift for young girls just moving away or someone like me who has already lived a half a century, and am starting a new job! Thumbs up on this one!I am becoming an avid fan of D.G. Kaye books!Can’t wait for the next one.

I really gained a lot from reading Ms. Kaye’s memoir. I appreciated her struggles with self-esteem and how she came to terms with herself and began living life on her terms. I appreciated her candor about the process and her advice for how other women can do the same. And yes…I’ve been more conscious of wearing my lipstick…thanks D. G. 🙂

 Special purchase price for Words We Carry : www.smarturl.it/bookwordswecarry

Also by D.G. Kaye

51c+jfFAgNL._UY250_51IpQxBodML._UY250_Have-Bags-kindle-cover-live

Buy all of D.G. Kaye’s Books : http://www.amazon.com/author/dgkaye7

About D.G. Kaye.

71F8zMPwPML._UX250_

D.G. Kaye was born and resides in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of Conflicted Hearts – A Daughter’s Quest for Solace From Emotional Guilt, Meno-What? – A Memoir, and Words We Carry. D.G. is a nonfiction/memoir writer. Kaye writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

D.G. writes to inspire others. Her writing encompasses stories taken from events she encountered in her own life, and the lessons that were taken from them. Her sunny outlook on life developed from learning to overcomes some of the many obstacles that challenged her. From an emotionally neglected childhood, to growing up with a narcissistic mother, leaving her with a severely deflated self-esteem, D.G. began seeking a path to rise above her issues. When she isn’t writing intimate memoirs, Kaye brings her natural sense of humor into her other works.

D.G. began writing when pen and paper became tools to express her pent-up emotions during a turbulent childhood. Her writing began as notes and cards she wrote for the people she loved and admired when she was afraid to use her voice.

Through the years, Kaye journaled about life, writing about her opinions on people and events and later began writing poetry and health articles for a Canadian magazine as her interest grew in natural healthcare. Kaye became interested in natural healing and remedies after encountering a few serious health issues. Against many odds, D.G. has overcome adversity several times throughout her life.

D.G. began writing books to share her stories and inspiration. Her compassion and life experiences inspire her to write from the heart. She looks for the good and the positive in everything, and believes in paying it forward.

“For every kindness, there should be kindness in return, Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

D.G.’s Favourite Saying: “Live. Laugh. Love …and don’t forget to breathe!

When D.G. is not writing, she’s reading. Her favourite genres of reading are: biographies, memoirs, writing and natural health. Kaye loves to read about people who overcome adversity, victories and redemption and believes we have to keep learning–there is always room for improvement! She loves to cook, travel, and play poker (when she gets the chance).

Links to connect with Debby.

Goodreads – http://www.goodreads.com/dgkaye
Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/pokercubster
Blog – http://www.dgkayewriter.com
Facebook –   http://www.facebook.com/dgkaye
Google   –   http://www.google.com/+DebbyDGKayeGies
LinkedIn – http://www.linkedin.com/in/dgkaye7

Thanks for joining us today for the first Book of the Week from the Cafe and Bookstore. Please help promote Debby’s book on promotion by sharing. Thanks Sally