Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives 2021 – #Pot Luck – #Family Comings and Goings Twenty Years Ago by Elizabeth Merry

Since this series began in January 2018 there have been over 1000 Posts from Your Archives where bloggers have taken the opportunity to share posts to a new audience… mine. The topics have ranged from travel, childhood, recipes, history, family and the most recent series was #PotLuck where I shared a random selection of different topics.

In this series I will be sharing posts from the last six months of 2020

It is an opportunity to showcase your writing skill to my readers and also to share on my social media. Which combined is around the 46,000 mark. If you are an author your books will be mentioned too, along with their buy links and your other social media contacts. Head over to find out how to participate: Posts from Your Archives 2021

This is the first post from author Elizabeth Merry and shares a memory that many parents have experienced when the nest empties.

Comings and Goings Twenty Years Ago

Being, like Woody Allen, too hostile to drive, I left my son to the airport bus. He was twenty, the first child to cross the sea in any direction, and he was going to America for a year to work in a holiday camp for children. To the Catskill mountains he was going, near New York. I stood on the road until I couldn’t see the bus any more and then I went into town as though it was any old Saturday. At three o’clock, when I knew he’d be taking off, I sat down; I had discovered a new pain in a new place.

Later, I went into his room and looked at the empty bed. I changed the sheets and tidied and cleaned. And then I washed all his clothes and hung them out and took them in and aired and ironed them, and folded them, oh so neat.

Long days later he phoned. He wanted tea-bags, nothing else, just tea-bags, and would I send them? He was having a great time, he said, meeting people from all over the world and he loved the heat and the craic was great but he wanted tea-bags. He said the night he arrived he stood at a balcony window and looked out at New York and he couldn’t stop smiling to himself because he was really there. And the picture of his there, leaning out with hands on the railings and him smiling is still in my head like a lost photograph.

So I got the tea-bags and packed them up and sent them and waited to hear they had arrived. His siblings said it was great; they never had to answer the phone when he was away because I’d have broken bones trying to get there first.

The parcel arrived. He’d be happy now, I thought, and I pictured him in the camp, up in the Catskill mountains with a crowd of children all different colours like in a holy picture, and them all sitting round in a circle drinking tea.

One day in town I looked at a mannequin in a window, and whatever way the head of it was turned or the way I looked at it I got such a sharp, terrible pain. My feet didn’t know where they were and I put a hand to the wall to steady myself.

The months passed and the day came for his return. oh, such cleanings and washings – I had everybody working, and at last, at last, the car arrived and out he got – a stranger, older, tanned, dressed in shorts and sandals – in a place where even on the hottest of hot days the boys sweltered in jeans and runners. He looked like a visitor and for a short while seemed like one.

That was years ago and they have all left and returned many times. You’d think I’d be used to it by now, but I’m not.

Broadcast on Radio Ulster 2006.

©Elizabeth Merry 2020

About Elizabeth Merry

Elizabeth Merry was born in Bangor, Co Down in the province of Ulster but has spent most of her life in Co Dublin. She has been writing for many years and has previously published a novel for children and many short stories. The present book “We All Die in the End” is a series of interlinked “scenes” set in a seaside town on the Ulster coast where most people know each other. It is a book filled with miserable couples, meddling siblings, or individuals struggling to survive. Some of the “scenes” are twisted, some are macabre, and more than a few deal with abusive relationships. But there is joy here too, and a lot of dark humour.

Elizabeth is, at present, working on a collection of poetry, much of which has been published over the years in literary magazines.

Books by Elizabeth Merry

An extract for one of the recent reviews for We All Die in the End

H.R.R. Gorman 5.0 out of 5 stars A Quaint, Dark, and Well-curated Collection  Reviewed in the United States on January 17, 2021

Without a doubt, this collection of short stories was the most well-curated of any I’ve seen. Not only did the stories fit together well thematically, and not only did they have the same general setting, but they wove into each other by mentioning various characters that showed up later. For instance, the first story is about Arthur, but he talks about Jennifer and her dogs. Jennifer shows up in the next story, and they introduce other characters. Carmel works at the grocer’s, and Julia and Sadie down at the pub are mentioned repeatedly.

It. Just. Works.

Most of the stories make you think, and many contain complex social relationships that only reveal themselves in their fullness at the end. That being said, I sure wouldn’t want to live in this town – too many bad guys and terrible people! There weren’t many characters I could really get behind and root for, as many of them were morally gray or completely decrepit. Even so, they were all interesting, and Merry writes very well.

Read the reviews and buy the books: Amazon US – And: Amazon UK –  Follow Elizabeth: Goodreads Blog: Embookstuff WordPress – Twitter: @ElizabethMerry1

 

Thanks for dropping in today and I know that Elizabeth would love your feedback.. thanks Sally.

Head over to find out how to participate in this series: Posts from Your Archives 2021

 

25 thoughts on “Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives 2021 – #Pot Luck – #Family Comings and Goings Twenty Years Ago by Elizabeth Merry

  1. Lovely post. I think all parents, especially moms, can relate to the pain that lodges in the heart for each of our kids as they head out to make their way through life. The child that was and the beautiful adult that is — what a journey. 💗

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Awesome post! I felt right along with Elizabeth through the highs and the lows. Sending our kids out into the world where they can spread their wings is a ritual that all parents/children must go through. It should get easier over time, but it doesn’t. We’re so proud that they are independent and make their mark in the world and wonder why they never need our help anymore.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. This is such a beautiful account and I think every parent can identify with it. We never stop worrying about our children and not knowing how they are when they’re so far away is hard to cope with. There is joy in that you’ve successfuly made them independent spirits to follow their own dreams and hopes, and there’s a real comfort to be had in knowing that they’re equipped to deal with what life throws at them and the caring mantle can be transferred to their shoulders. Job done!

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Pingback: Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – March 7th -13th 2021 – Free promotion, Petula Clark, Pigeons, Poetry, Anti-Aging, Frozen Shoulders and humour | Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

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