Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – FREE book, Invitation to a Party and brilliant writers.


Welcome to the weekly round up and a reminder that What’s in a Name Volume one is FREE until midnight tonight. I am not part of the Kindle family although all my books are formated to be read on Kindles, Nooks and any other devices. So I don’t do the Kindle select promotions. However, most of you know we well enough to email me and that your information is safe.

About the stories

There are names that have been passed down through thousands of years which have powerful and deep-rooted meaning to their bearers. Other names have been adopted from other languages, cultures and from the big screen. They all have one thing in common. They are with us from birth until the grave and they are how we are known to everyone that we meet.

There are classical names such as Adam, David and Sarah that will grace millions of babies in the future. There are also names that parents have invented or borrowed from places or events in their lives which may last just one lifetime or may become the classic names of tomorrow.

Whatever the name there is always a story behind it. In What’s in a Name? – Volume One, twenty men and women face danger, love, loss, romance, fear, revenge and rebirth as they move through their lives.

Anne changes her name because of associations with her childhood, Brian carries the mark of ancient man, Jane discovers that her life is about to take a very different direction, and what is Isobel’s secret?

The book is available in Mobi (Kindle) Epub (other devices) and pdf for those of you without a reader.

Just email me on sally.cronin@moyhill.com and I will whisk a copy over to you. I appreciate that many of you have TBRs that rival the Leaning Tower of Pisa… but that is okay and I also have no expectation of a review… unless you really want to!

You can read a number of reviews for the book: https://www.amazon.com/Whats-Name-Sally-Cronin-ebook/dp/B01N6Y8BK1

and the latest review by Paul Andruss which is a story too: http://www.paul-andruss.com/whats-in-a-name-vol-1/

End of Summer Party – August 26th – 28th – all welcome.

I will be roasting showcasing, those bloggers who have been with me since I began Smorgasbord four years ago.. and apart from these guests, I am inviting everyone to chip in with their details in the comments. I have some food and drink (virtually no calories) and there will be some music. I hope you will be able to pop in .

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/smorgasbord-invitation-to-an-end-of-summer-house-party-saturday-26th-to-monday-28th-august/

My secretary Mavis has reminded me that it is time to get on with the round up of the week’s posts that you might have missed.

I am of course very grateful to my guests this week who have provided us with entertaining and interesting posts. Thanks to Anne Casey, Julie Lawford and Carol Taylor who will be with us through the summer and beyond I hope.

William Price King is still on his summer break but I have been sharing a previous series that proved very popular the first time around.. Tony Bennett the ultimate performer.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/09/smorgasbord-summer-jazz-2017-william-price-king-meets-tony-bennett-part-three-the-1960s/

Guest post from poet and song writer Anne Casey talking about the path to the publication of her debut poetry collection. Including her published work in the Irish Times.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/08/smorgasbord-guest-post-writing-all-the-wrong-things-by-anne-casey/

Julie Lawford continues her summer of lifestyle articles with her top ten tips for maintaining your weight loss.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/my-top-ten-experienced-based-tips-for-sustainable-and-healthy-weightloss-by-julie-lawford/

I was delighted to welcome Carol Taylor to the blog for the first of a collaborative series on my top healthy foods with some wonderful recipes from Carol.. This week delicious ways to prepare the king of fish.. salmon.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/09/smorgasbord-health-cook-from-scratch-with-sally-and-carol-salmon-omega-3-on-a-plate/

Milestones along the way by Geoff Cronin

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/12/milestones-along-the-way-tradition-and-smoke-signals-by-geoff-cronin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/13/milestones-along-the-way-100-plants-and-snippets-by-geoff-cronin/

I have posted another one of my entertainment reviews and this time for King Arthur: Legend of the Sword….

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/07/smorgasbord-entertainment-movie-review-king-arthur-legend-of-the-sword-by-sally-cronin-2/

Book Promotion

For the next 12 weeks I am guest posting with a number of fantastic bloggers as part of the Odd Jobs and Characters, What’s in a Name launch series. I am posting the first three and then this Friday, Debby Gies is hosting the first of the guest appearances.. By all accounts she has added some Debby specials to the post so I hope you will head over and check it out.

This week was part one of my adventures as a dental nurse back in the late 1960s…haha.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/07/odd-jobs-and-characters-the-dental-surgery-part-one-sally-cronin/

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New on the Shelves

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/08/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-on-the-shelves-witchlet-book-one-the-magical-chapters-trilogy-by-victoria-zigler/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/09/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-on-the-shelves-a-desolate-hour-point-pleasant-series-by-mae-clair/

Cafe and Bookstore Update

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/07/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-jacqueline-oby-ikocha-and-john-nicholl/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/11/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-dan-alatorre-pamela-d-beverly-and-jacquie-biggar/

Air Your Promotions

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/08/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-carmen-stefanescu-and-patricia-k-salamone/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-janice-spina-gigi-sedlmayer-and-sally-cronin/

Smorgasbord Short story

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/08/smorgasbord-short-stories-a-cat-called-by-iris-mick/

Smorgasbord Blogger Daily

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/07/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-monday-august-7th-2017-sue-vincent-geoff-le-pard-c-s-boyack-and-d-g-kaye/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/08/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-tuesday-8th-august-2017-lucinda-e-clarke-steve-tanham-don-massenzio-and-colleen-chesebro/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/09/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-wednesday-9th-august-2017-susan-toy-annette-rochelle-aben-d-g-kaye-with-tina-frisco-sue-vincent-with-judith-barrow/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-thursday-10th-august-2017-story-reading-ape-with-yecheilyah-ysrayl-wendy-scott-with-john-howell-and-jennie-fitzkee/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/11/smorgasbord-blogger-daily-friday-11th-august-2017-lucinda-e-clarke-debby-gies-free-book-steve-costello-carmen-stefanescu-and-christy-birmingham/

Weekly image and Haiku

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/12/smorgasbord-poetry-haiku-honouring-feng-shui/

Humour and afternoon videos

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/07/the-afternoon-video-the-first-time-i-saw-your-face/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/smorgasbord-laughter-academy-archives-doctors-dentists-driving-and-double-glazing/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/08/11/afternoon-video-archive-theres-a-cat-in-my-bed-dogs-fighting-a-losing-battle/

Thank you for all your support and generosity in sharing.. Enjoy the rest of the weekend and hope you will visit again next week.

 

 

Smorgasbord Weekly Round Up – Opera, Film, Books, Humour and Authors who rock.


Welcome to this week’s round up of posts you might haved missed. As always my thanks to William Price King and Paul Andruss who are such huge supporters and contributors to the blog.. Also this week to Julie Lawford with a very informative posts on the challenges of being left-handed, and to Karen Ingalls, whose post shares her experiences as an ovarian cancer survivor.

I have been busy offline, finishing one project and moving onto the next. I have also been working on the plan for the blog from September onwards with some new promotional opportunities for authors and bloggers. In October the blog will be four years old and I would like to celebrate that with a week of guest posts.  I am hoping to persuade those of you who have been with me for most of those four years to share some highlights from your own blogs and the funniest moments too.  More about that later in the summer but perhaps you can get your thinking caps on now.  It is of course an opportunity to share your work and perhaps inspire others to take up this madness that is blogging.

Thank you very much for popping in and for leaving feedback and sharing the posts across your own networks.. I cannot tell you how much I appreciate that. More to come in the next week and I hope you will have the time to drop in again.

Time to get on with the posts from the week…

William Price King Meets Some legends

We look at some of the music from the films of Barbra Streisand in the 1980s and 1990s.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/12/william-price-king-meets-some-legends-barbra-streisand-1980s1990s-and-films/

Smorgasbord Writer in Residence Paul Andruss

This week Paul takes us back through the centuries to discover the origins of our modern day opera including some of the less highbrow aspects of this form of entertainment.

Thomas the Rhymer

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/14/writer-in-residence-whats-opera-doc-by-paul-andruss/

The Black Bitch and other Tales by Geoff Cronin

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/15/the-black-bitch-and-other-tales-technique-and-the-soliloquy-and-snippets-by-geoff-cronin/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/16/the-black-bitch-and-other-tales-he-who-laughs-last-and-technique-kerry-style-by-geoff-cronin/

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore Update

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/10/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-sue-coletta-janice-spina-and-amy-m-reade/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/14/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-author-update-mira-prabhu-c-s-boyack-and-darlene-foster/

Book and blog marketing

A reminder of how you can join the other authors on the shelves of the Cafe and Bookstore

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/09/sallys-cafe-and-bookstore-new-on-the-shelves-update-free-book-promotion/

Book promotion on Twitter

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/10/smorgasbord-book-promotion-twitter-tagging-and-pinned-tweet-to-spread-the-word/

Taking advantage of book promotion opportunities

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/12/smorgasbord-book-promotion-modesty-perfection-and-promotions-sally-g-cronin/

My review of No More Mulberries by Mary Smith

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/14/smorgasbord-book-promotion-my-book-review-of-no-more-mulberries-by-mary-smith/

Air Your Reviews

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/11/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-colleen-chesebro-bette-a-stevens-and-luna-saint-claire/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/13/smorgasbord-book-promotion-air-your-reviews-don-massenzio-teagan-riordain-geneviene-and-paul-cude/

Short Stories

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/12/smorgasbord-short-stories-tales-from-the-garden-by-sally-cronin-the-boy-his-dog-and-the-fairy-princess/

Poetry

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/13/smorgasbord-poetry-time-on-my-own-by-sally-cronin/

Health

Latest research in to the use of Vitamin C in an effective treatment for sepsis

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/11/smorgasbord-health-2017-latest-research-vitamin-c-treatment-for-sepsis/

Guest post by Julie Lawford on the challenges of being left-handed.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/11/smorgasbord-guest-writer-julie-lawford-leftwrite-on-being-a-southpaw/

Guest post by Karen Ingalls, Ovarian cancer survivor.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/13/smorgasbord-health-2017-top-to-toe-female-reproductive-system-outshining-ovarian-cancer-by-karen-ingalls/

Top to Toe – The Female Reproductive System

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/10/smorgasbord-health-2017-top-to-toe-female-reproductive-system-updated-some-health-issues/

Humour

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/10/afternoon-video-revisited-the-fastest-dog-in-the-west-barry-the-wonder-dog/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/11/smorgasbord-laughter-academy-a-writers-life-or-words-to-that-effect/

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/07/14/smorgasbord-laughter-academy-it-is-all-in-the-headlines/

 

Thank you again and hope to see you next week.. Enjoy your sunday.. Sally

William Price King Meets some Legends – Barbra Streisand – 1960s/1970s – It’s all about the music


To celebrate some of the most memorable music of Barbra Streisand the focus of today’s post is the music from the award winning movies that she starred in and also composed music for, during the mid- 1960s and early 1970s. William Price King has selected some of her greatest hits from this period along with the background to the tracks.

Hello Dolly is a 1964 musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilder’s 1938 farce “The Merchant of Yonkers,” which Wilder revised and retitled “The Matchmaker” in 1955. Streisand’s Dolly is a rebuke to the modern anxiety about whether or not women can or should “have it all”. Her Dolly is an impressive striver with a heart of gold who knows what she wants, and her ability to convey joy, longing, and lightness with her voice is unparalleled. Louis Armstrong, whose recording of “Hello Dolly” became a number-one single in May 1964, also performs the song (together with Streisand).

In 1965 building on the success of Funny Girl, Hello Dolly and albums of the early 1960s, Barbra Streisand turned to the new vehicle for stardom, reaching into everyone’s home. Her television show ‘My Name is Barbra‘ was an immediate success and received five Emmy awards and CBS gave her a ten year contract to produce and star in more specials. Barbra was given complete artistic control of the next four productions.

In 1966 ‘Funny Girl’ went to London at the Prince of Wales Theater, followed by the screen version in 1968, winning Barbra Streisand an Academy Award. She also won a Golden Globe and was named ‘Star of the Year’ by the National Association of Theater Owners.

In 1969 Barbra achieved big screen success with the film version “Hello, Dolly!” followed a year later by “On a Clear Day You Can See Forever“. With a step away from musicals she starred in “The Owl and the Pussycat” in 1970 with George Segal  and in 1972 “What’s Up Doc?” with Ryan O’Neal.  The same year she founded her own production company, Barwood Films with the first being “Up the Sandbox”.

Up the Sandbox was one of the first films to explore women’s changing roles during the sexual revolution of the early 1970s. A number of critics praised Streisand’s performance. According to Pauline Kael, “Barbra Streisand [had] never seemed so radiant as in this joyful mess, taken from the Anne Richardson Roiphe novel and directed by Irvin Kershner. The picture is full of knockabout urban humor”

At the beginnning of the 1970s Barbra Streisand had moved into more contemporary material and found her niches in the pop and ballad charts with her album “Stoney End” in 1971.

“Stoney End,”a Laura Nyro composition, redefined Streisand as an effective pop/rock singer. It was released in the US in 1971 and charted at number 6 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 2 on the Adult Contemporary chart. It also reached number 27 on the UK singles chart. This recording was a change in direction for Streisand, with a more upbeat contemporary pop sound. When asked by fans during the Q&A segment of Streisand’s Back To Brooklyn concert on October 11, 2012 what “Stoney End” was about, she replied that she still didn’t know.

In 1973 Barbra starred in “The Way We Were” with Robert Redford. Directed by Sydney Pollack with a screenplay by Arthur Laurents, the story follows Laurent’s college days at Cornell University and his experiences with the House Un-American Activities Committee. The HUAC was created in 1938 to investigate alleged disloyalty and subversive activities on the part of private citizens, public employees, and those organizations suspected of having communist ties. Many in Hollywood would find themselves as subjects of this organisation over the next twenty years or so.

“The Way We Were” won the Oscar for Best Original Dramatic Score and Best Original Song. It ranked at number 6 on AFI’s 100 Years …100 Passions survey of the top 100 greatest love stories in American cinema. The song became a million-selling gold single, topping the Billboard 100 and selling more than two million copies. Billboard named “The Way We Were” as the number 1 pop hit of 1974. In 1998, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame and finished at number 8 on AFI’s 100 Years … 100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema in 2004. It was also included in the list of Songs of the Century, by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts.

The next hit that would bring awards for Barbra Streisand was the film “A Star is Born” in 1976 starring Kris Kristofferson.. The plot sees a young woman entering show business, meeting and falling in love with an established star who acts as her mentor. As she becomes more successful his career begins to decline with the resulting dramatic results.

“Evergreen” is the theme song from the  film, composed by the diva herself, with lyrics by Paul Williams. Both Streisand and Williams earned an Oscar and a Golden Globes Award for Best Original Song. Streisand was the first woman ever to be honored with an Oscar as a composer. In addition to that, “Evergreen” won the Grammy Award for “Song of the Year.”

Read all the reviews and buy Barbra Streisand’s music: https://www.amazon.com/Barbra-Streisand/e/B000AQ2ZRU

Additional information sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbra_Streisand

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Previous Legends can be found here:

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-meets-some-legends/

You will find the previous artists..  Luciano Pavarotti, Andrea Bocelli, Kiri Te Kanawa in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/classical-music-with-william-price-king/

And for the Jazz in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-jazz-and-music-series/

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you have enjoyed the show.. Please feel free to share.

New series of William Price King meets some Legends – Barbra Streisand – The Early Years


Welcome to the new series of William Price King meets some Legends. I doubt that anyone reading this has not heard the music of Barbra Streisand or watched her movies. William takes us behind the scenes and also shares her most popular music across the decades. One of the most iconic songs of her early career was from the film Funny Girl and has become an anthem for anyone who has worked hard to achieve their dreams.

“Don’t Rain On My Parade,” written by Bob Merrill and Jule Styne, is from the 1964 musical “Funny Girl” and was featured in the 1968 movie version of the musical. Both the movie and stage versions feature Streisand performing the song. In 2004 it finished #46 in AFI’s 100 Years … 100 Songs survey of the top tunes in American cinema.

When we look at the sophisticated and accomplished artist who performs so effortlessly, it is easy to forget that for many the road to stardom was challenging. This was the case with Barbra Streisand who was born into a loving family in Brooklyn in 1942.

Her grandparents on her mother’s side had emigrated from Russia and on her father’s side from Galica which was then Poland-Ukraine. Barbra’s mother Ida had been a soprano before becoming a school secretary and her father taught high school English. Tragically shortly after Barbra’s first birthday her father died at only age 34 from complications from an epileptic seizure. This obviously had a devastating effect on the small family and a financial impact. Ida worked as a bookkeeper to try and make ends meet but it meant that time with Barbra was limited. Eventually the two of them moved in with her grandparents and Ida returned to singing as a semi-professional to help pay the bills. When Barbra was seven years old, her mother remarried Louis Kind and in 1951 her sister Rosalind was born.

As a teenager Barbra became entranced with the movies and the elegant stars that filled the screen. Acting for a living became her dream and one of the ways that she discovered she could gain attention was by singing. She became known in the neighbourhood for her voice and would often practice in the hallway of their apartment building which gave her voice an echoing quality.

By 1955 Barbra was an honor student in modern history, English and Spanish and she also joined the Freshman Chorus and Choral Club. One of her classmates was Neil Diamond who was also a member of choir.  At age 14, Barbra saw her first Broadway play “The Diary of Anne Frank” starring Susan Strasberg who became her new role model. She began spending time in the library studying the biographies of various stage actresses such as Sarah Bernhardt and the classic playwrights such as Shakespeare and Chekhov.

Her first walk-on part was in the summer of 1957 at age 15 at the Playhouse in Malden Bridge, New York. This was followed by a couple of small roles and on her return to school at the end of the summer, she took a backstage job a the Cherry Lane Theatre in Greenwich Village. This lead to a part in “Driftwood” working with Joan Rivers.

At age sixteen, she graduated from Erasmus Hall in January 1959, she was fourth in her class. Despite her mother’s pleas that she stay out of show business, she immediately set out trying to get roles on the New York City stage. Barbra Streisand never attended college. After renting a small apartment on 48th street, in the heart of the theater district, she accepted any job she could involving the stage, and at every opportunity, she “made the rounds” of the casting offices.

She took a job as an usher at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater for “The Sound of Music,” early in 1960. During the run of the play, she heard that the casting director was auditioning for more singers, and it marked the first time she sang in pursuit of a job. Although the director felt she was not right for the part, he encouraged her to begin including her talent as a singer on her résumé when looking for other work.

This began a new direction for Barbra Streisand with talent contests and an audition at the Bon Soir Nightclub with a contract for $125 per week. In 1960 at age 18, she was the opening act of Phyllis Diller. Her then boyfriend Barry Dennen who had been encouraging her singing also exposed her to his extensive collection of female singing artists such as Billie Holiday and Edith Piaf that helped Barbra develop her own style.. With a developing sophisticated onstage presence, Barbra Streisand was winning new fans at every performance.

With the help of her new personal manager, Martin Erlichman, Barbra enjoyed success in shows in Detroit and St. Louis and then on to the popular Blue Angel nightclub in Manhattan between 1961 and 1962. This led to her first television appearance on The Tonight Show bringing her talent to a much wider audience.

Her acting dream however was not forgotten, and while still appearing at the Blue Angel, theater director and playwright Arthur Laurents asked her to audition for a new musical comedy he was directing, “I Can Get It For Wholesale.” She got the part of secretary to the lead actor businessman, played by then unknown Elliott Gould. They fell in love during rehearsals and eventually moved into a small apartment together. The show opened on March 22, 1962, at the Shubert Theater, and received rave reviews. She then became Broadway’s most exciting and youngest new star.

“Happy Days Are Here Again,” written by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen, was featured in the 1930 film “Chasing Rainbows.” Streisand first recorded this song in 1962, and it was her first commercial hit. She re- recorded it in January 1963 for her solo album debut “The Barbra Streisand Album.” While this song was traditionally sung at a faster tempo, Streisand’s version stands out because of how slowly and expressively she sings it. It also took on a political meaning.

This was followed by appearances on the “Ed Sullivan Show” and in a number of Bob Hope specials. Liberace was immediately drawn to the young singer and invited her to Las Vegas to perform as his opening act at the Riviera Hotel. The next year Barbra starred in her own show in Lake Tahoe and she and Elliot Gould married.

Streisand signed with Columbia Records that same year and released her first album, “The Barbra Streisand Album” in 1963. It became a Top 10 gold record and received two Grammy Awards, including Album of the Year and Best Female Performance. At the time, she was the youngest artist to receive those honors, and became the best-selling female vocalist in the country. That summer she also released “The Second Barbra Streisand Album,” which established her as the “most exciting new personality since Elvis Presley.”

Streisand returned to Broadway in 1964 with an acclaimed performance as entertainer Fanny Brice in “Funny Girl” at the Winter Garden Theater. The show introduced two of her signature songs, “People” and “Don’t Rain on My Parade.” Because of the play’s overnight success, she appeared on the cover of “Time.” In 1964 Streisand was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Musical but lost to Carol Channing in “Hello, Dolly!”

“People,” was one of the first songs written for the musical score of “Funny Girl,” based on the life and career of Broadway and film star Fanny Brice. In 1965 Streisand won the Grammy Award for Best Vocal Performance with this fabulous song. This song has been covered by some of the greatest names in the music industry, including Andy Williams, Ella Fitzgerald, Perry Como, and The Supremes. In 1998, Streisand’s version was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 2004, Streisand’s version on the soundtrack of Funny Girl finished at #13 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

Buy Funny Girl: https://www.amazon.com/Funny-Girl-Barbra-Streisand/dp/B00005O3VD

Read all the reviews and buy Barbra Streisand’s music: https://www.amazon.com/Barbra-Streisand/e/B000AQ2ZRU

Additional information sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbra_Streisand

In Barbra Streisand’s six decade career she has succeeded in several fields of entertainment and has achieved the highest recognition for her artistry including two Academy Awards, ten Grammy Awards, five Emmy Awards, Presidential Medal of Freedom and nine Golden Globes.

She is one of the best-selling music artists of all time with more than 145 million records sold worldwide.

To finish this first part of her career here is another of the show stoppers from Funny Girl and next week we will look at her successful singles in the 1970s.

“My Man” (Mon Homme), written by Jacques Charles, Channing Pollock, Albert Willemetz, and Maurice Yvain, originated in France where it was a hit for Mistinguett in 1916, then popularized in the English speaking world in the 1920s by singer Fanny Brice from the Ziegfeld Follies. This song earned a Grammy Hall of Fame Award for Brice in 1999. Composer Jules Styne did not want “My Man” in the Broadway score, but was overruled because Fanny Brice was known for singing this song. In 1965, the song was covered by Barbra Streisand on her album “My Name Is Barbra” and in the film adaptation of “Funny Girl.” Her rendition of “My Man”, sung during the film’s finale, drew additional critical praise to an already lauded performance that earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1968. Streisand later called this a victim song, which suggests that one’s happiness is contingent on another person’s behavior, and shied away from singing the song publicly many times during her career.

I hope you will join us again next week.  Thanks Sally

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

Previous Legends can be found here:

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-meets-some-legends/

You will find the previous artists..  Luciano Pavarotti, Andrea Bocelli, Kiri Te Kanawa in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/classical-music-with-william-price-king/

And for the Jazz in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-jazz-and-music-series/

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope you have enjoyed the show.. Please feel free to share.

Smorgasbord Short Stories – The Flying Officer by Sally Cronin

Status


The first time Patrick Walsh saw her, was as he wended his way slowly down the hill between the slow moving trucks on his motorbike. The road was lined with women and old men who were handing out hastily cut sandwiches and mugs of tea to the men in the trucks, whose outstretched hands gratefully received these simple acts of kindness. It was clear from the their faces that they found the peaceful summer skies overhead, and clamour of women’s voices, a much needed reminder of home and safety.

He knew where they had come from, as for the last six days he had been flying over them as they had scrambled into small boats to be ferried out to the larger naval vessels waiting to take them to safety. He and his squadron were a part of the massive air defence operaton. Thousands of soldiers were pouring off the beaches having gathered over the last few days from the surrounding countryside; exposed and being attacked by superior German forces. On the last run today his spitfire had received a direct hit to the cockpit from a persistent Messerschmitt Me 109; luckily missing his head by inches apart from a cut over his eye, earning him a few hours respite. His plane would be ready to fly first thing in the morning. The ground crews at all fighter squadrons were working around the clock to get pilots back in the air until the evacuation from the French coast was complete.

As he carefully maneuvered between the trucks he responded to the shouts from the men above him with a small wave. He knew that their good natured jibes were aimed at his uniform and the wings that it displayed, and that their friendly ribbing was their way of showing gratitude. He decided that it would be easier to wait until the convoy had passed to continue into the village square. He dismounted, standing by the hedge to watch the villagers as they persisted in their need to comfort these dispirited men with tea and offerings of food.

She stood out from the crowd of women. Tall with long red hair tied back with an emerald green ribbon, she was dressed in overalls and wore heavy boots. She had a natural elegance as she darted between an older woman, holding a tea tray piled with jam sandwiches, and the trucks. Despite the men’s exhaustion, eager hands grasped the food, winking and flirting with the prettiest thing they had seen for a long while.

Patrick leaned back against the saddle of his bike and let himself enjoy this brief moment of humanity that was so rare today. He had been flying since the first weeks of the war and his squadron had suffered huge losses; particularly in the last few weeks as they had provided air cover for the retreating British forces. They had been warned that far worse was to come as the enemy amassed both fighters and bombers for an all-out offensive on the country. Having already lost many friends, Patrick knew that it was only a matter of time before he became a statistic.

Some of his fellow pilots and aircrew decided that they would live as hard as they fought. There were plenty of pretty girls around the station that were delighted to dance the night away and bring some laughter and sometimes love into the young men’s lives. He had seen the results of these whirlwind romances at the Saturday night dance in the village hall. As the airmen arrived in an ever changing group of young men, expectant faces would be watching the door and it was not unusual to see a girl being led away in tears by her friends.

Patrick loved to dance but gently refused the invitations to take to the floor and over the last few months he had become regarded as something of a misery. His friends gave up on their attempts to persuade him that he should live for the moment, and with a wry smile he listened to the chat up lines that were guaranteed to pull the heartstrings of a pretty girl.

But now as he watched the red head flying back and forth and smiling up at the men in the trucks, he felt an overwhelming urge to hold her in his arms and waltz around a dance floor. He shook his head and reminded himself that it would only lead to heartbreak for her, and he couldn’t bear the thought of those beautiful green eyes filling with tears.

An hour later the last truck in the convoy disappeared through the village square and out of sight. There would be more coming through from the coast, and Patrick watched as the crowd of villagers gathered up their cups and trays and disappeared back into their homes. They would prepare more from their meagre rations for the next wave of returning soldiers and be waiting for them by the roadside. He remained by the hedge until the red headed girl had linked arms with her mother and entered her house before riding down to the square.

‘Patrick, are you awake my friend?’ The voice of his Polish friend Jakub intruded into his daydream about dancing with his stunning red head.

‘Just about, do you want to go to the Black Swan for a beer? He sat up and rested his head in his hands and tried to bring his mind back to reality.

He looked around the Nissen hut that was their home, taking in the four empty cots that waited for the new arrivals. They would be mostly teenagers with only a few hours flying solo, and none of them in combat. He was only twenty-four, but he felt like an old man compared to the fresh faced and eager boys that would come through that door tomorrow.

It was now August and the skies were filled with formations of enemy bombers most nights. His plane was grounded again having the undercarriage repaired after a problem on his last landing. His mechanic said he had the ‘luck of the Irish’. Patrick was well aware that he was now one of only a handful of pilots remaining from the original group a year ago; he knew that his luck was bound to run out sooner or later. There was just one thing that he needed tonight, and that was the sight of Red, and she would be helping out her dad behind the bar at the Black Swan.

Two hours later he and Jakub sat quietly at a corner table with their glasses of beer. One beer was the limit as both of them would be back in the skies tomorrow; a cockpit was no place for lack of concentration. Jakub was married and expecting his first child and was happy to sit quietly in the warm and welcoming atmosphere thinking about his next leave in a week’s time. Patrick however spent his time watching Red as she served customers and laughed with the regulars. That laugh was in his head and was added to all the other pieces of her that he carried with him as he flew missions. The thought of those green eyes helped dispel the voice of the other constant companion that was by his side each time he buckled himself into the cockpit. Her presence in his heart and mind had helped him control his fear; bringing the realisation that he was in love for the first time in his life.

Over the weeks since that first day on the hill, there had been moments in the pub, when he would catch her eye and they would both smile then look away. By sitting at the bar when he popped in alone, he had gathered more information about her. She wasn’t called Red of course, but Georgina and Georgie to her friends. She didn’t seem to have a boyfriend amongst the regulars who frequented the pub, and one day he overheard that she had been engaged to a soldier who had been killed within weeks of the war starting.

He would watch as she gently refused all attempts by eager young warriors to take her on a date, realising that her heart had already been broken. This reinforced his resolve not to give in to the growing need to tell Georgie of his feelings; convinced it would only bring her further sorrow.

Through the rest of the summer months missions intensified, with both daylight and night bombing raids on the docks and major cities; almost bringing the country to its knees. In the October the tide began to turn, but not without the loss of thousands of fighter pilots and bomber air crews. It was then that Patrick’s luck ran out as he limped home with a badly damaged plane and shrapnel injuries in his chest and arm.

Patrick fought to stay conscious as the plane shuddered and bucked as he flew using his one good hand. Blood from a head wound almost blinded him, but as he saw the runway rushing up to meet him, he managed to bring the nose around and head for the grass to the side. The last thing that he thought about as the world went black was Georgie’s face and laugh.

A month later Patrick got one of the pilots to drop him off at the Black Swan and he walked into the early evening quiet of the bar. He had just received his new orders on his return from the hospital. From Monday he would be moving into an intelligence role where his experience in combat could be put to use. He was making a good recovery, but the extensive injuries to his arm meant the end of his flying career; now he would be ensuring that he kept others safe in the skies. In one way he felt that he was abandoning those that he regarded as family in their close knit squadron, but he also knew that it offered him the opportunity to fulfil a dream that was equally important.

Georgie was polishing glasses and looked up to greet the new customer with her usual smile but instead she took a deep breath. As he moved closer Patrick could see that there were tears in her glorious green eyes. Georgie stepped out from behind the bar and walked towards him, glancing at his arm in its sling and the scar that was etched into his forehead. She stood in front of him and neither spoke for a moment until he reached out his good arm to take her hand.

‘Is there any chance that you might let me take you to the dance tomorrow night?’

She smiled through her tears. ‘How are you going to be able to dance with only one free arm?’

He pulled her into him and looked down at the lips that he had imagined kissing so many times in the last few months.

‘Don’t worry Red… I’ll manage just fine.’

 

©sallycronin 2017

Thank you for dropping in and I hope you enjoyed the story. Thanks Sally

William Price King meets some Legends – Bruce Springsteen – Part Two


Welcome to the second post in the new series from Jazz singer, musician and composer William Price King.

William has informed and entertained us for the last three years with wonderful behind the scenes and insightful posts about some of the most iconic artists in jazz and classical music.

For those of us of a certain age – there are certain contemporary artists who have weaved their musical magic over the last 50 years or so. In this series William will be exploring the lives and music of those artists and in this series we are exploring the life and music of  The Boss.. Bruce Springsteen.

Last week we looked at Bruce Springsteen’s early life and career and you can find that post here. https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-meets-some-legends/

Now over to William for part two.

His prolific song writing ability, with “More words in some individual songs than other artists had in whole albums”, as his future record label would describe it in early publicity campaigns, brought his skill to the attention of several people who were about to change his life: new managers Mike Appel and Jim Cretecos, who in turn brought him to the attention of Columbia Records talent scout John Hammond, who auditioned Springsteen in May 1972.

Although this was a huge turning point in Bruce Springsteen’s career it would get off to a somewhat slow start. His first studio album with Columbia Records, Greetings from Asbury Park, NJ brought critical acclaim but was slow to catch on with the buying public. Comparisons were being made between his lyrical style and that of Bob Dylan but that did not sell records. This experience was to be repeated later in the year when Springsteen and the E Street Band followed up their debut with The Wild, The Innocent, & The E Street Shuffle in January 1973. Again the critics found little fault with the album but sales were slow.

“Blinded by the light” was Springsteen’s first single from the “Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J.” album in 1972. He admitted in interviews that this was the first time that he used a rhyming dictionary to write a song because he was under pressure to come up with a “hit” from his record label. He described the song as a sort of coded autobiography: “I wanted to get blinded by the light, I wanted to do things I hadn’t done, see things I hadn’t seen.” The track was later covered by Manfred Mann’s Earth Band in 1977 and reached number one in America and Canada.

In 1974, music critic Jon Landau wrote, after seeing a performance at the Harvard Square Theater, “I saw rock and roll future, and its name is Bruce Springsteen. And on a night when I needed to feel young, he made me feel like I was hearing music for the very first time.” Landau helped to finish the epic new album Born to Run and subsequently became Springsteen’s manager and producer.

The album took 14 months to record with six months of that spent on the title track Born to Run. Despite the time spent on the album, Bruce Springsteen was not happy with the finished product and told his new manager that he wanted to cut it live at his regular venue The Bottom Line.

In mid August 1975 the E Street Band began a five night, 10 show gig at the club which attracted a great deal of media attention. It was broadcast live on WNEW-FM and many years later Rolling Stone Magazine recognised that gig as one of the 50 Moments That Changed Rock and Roll. The album was released two weeks later and went to #3 on the Billboard 200 with the single Born to Run reaching # 23 on the Billboard charts.

“Born to Run” is Springsteen’s signature song. This song is what rock-n-roll is all about – escape, romance, redemption, and the hope of something better. In this performance Springsteen expresses the hunger, doubt, courage, and fear one has in stepping out into the world for the first time on his own, and he does it with an irresistible force.

After struggling for recognition from the buying public for a number of years the floodgates opened and Bruce appeared on the covers of both Time and Newsweek the same week on October 27th of 1975. Despite the wait, the new found fame did not sit easily on Springsteen and he found the promotional aspects of their first overseas tour in London challenging.

There was also trouble on the home front with a dispute with former manager Mike Appel that kept the bank out of the studio for a year. Bruce kept the E Street Band together by touring across the US but fans did notice that there was a darker edge to his performances than before. A settlement was reached with Mike Appel in 1977 and Springsteen and the band returned to the studio to record Darkness on the Edge of Town which was released in 1978.

The album did not produce high charting singles but stayed in the album charts for 97 weeks and was certified Triple Platinum by the RIAA. Reviews were positive with critics noting a new maturity in the lyrics. The fans certainly approved of the album and many of the tracks have become performance favourites to this day.

“Racing in the Street” is a mournful – like ballad which begins with a slow, graceful, and elegant introduction on the the piano played by Roy Bittan. This is a song which celebrates a man’s desire for freedom from responsibility, which is symbolized by the ability to drive to freedom in a fast car, thus using a fast car as a means of escape. This is Bruce Springsteen at his best.

Musically, this album was a turning point in Springsteen’s career. “The whole force of “Darkness” was a survival thing,” he said. “After Born to Run, I had a reaction to my good fortune. With success, it felt like a lot of people who’d come before me lost some essential part of themselves. My greatest fear was that success was going to change or diminish that part of myself.”

In order to promote the album, Springsteen and the E Street Band embarked on a cross-country tour that would make them famous for their marathon performances (three or four hours per show), boisterous behavior and infectious energy, captivating audiences from California to New York. During this time, Springsteen also became famous for his integrity and pride as a performer, as stories of his exhausting performances and perfectionism in the recording studio became legend.

Not only was Bruce Springsteen seen as a consumate performer but he was rapidly earning a reputation in the pop world as a songwriter. Apart from Blinded by the Light which was a hit for Manfred Mann, in 1978 Patti Smith reached #13 with Because the NIght and The Pointer Sisters hit #2 in 1979 with Springsteen’s so far unreleased Fire.

Bruce Springsteen wrote “Fire” for his idol Elvis Presley, after having seen him perform in Philadelphia. Springsteen said: “I sent Elvis a demo of it but he died before it arrived.” Following The Pointer Sister’s hit it was included in Springsteen’s “Live/1975-85” concert album and released as a single. It reached #46 on the Billboard Hot 100, #18 in Ireland, #54 in the UK and #82 in Australia.

Additional material: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Springsteen

For concert schedules and news: http://brucespringsteen.net/

Buy Bruce Springsteen’s Music: https://www.amazon.com/Bruce-Springsteen/e/B000AQ2ZLQ

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, musician and composer. Originally he studied classical music and opera but over the years his style has evolved to what many refer to as the ‘sweet point’ where music and voice come together so beautifully.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Torme. His jazz album, ‘Home,’ is a collection of contemporary songs and whilst clearly a homage to their wonderful legacy it brings a new and refreshing complexity to the vocals that is entrancing.

His latest album Eric Sempe and William Price King is now available to download. The repertory includes standards such as “Bye Bye Blackbird” (a jazz classic), Sting’s “Englishman in New York,” Queen’s “The Show Must Go On”, Led Zepplin’s “Stairway to Heaven” and other well-known jazz, pop, and rock classics.

William and Eric Sempe have also brought their own magic to the album with original tracks such as Keep on Dreaming and Red Snow with collaboration with Jeanne King
Download the new album. http://cdbaby.com/cd/williampriceking

William is currently in France where he performs in popular Jazz Venues in Nice and surrounding area.

Connect to William

Website – http://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitter – @wpkofficial
Regular Venue – http://cave-wilson.com/
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You will find the previous artists..  Luciano Pavarotti, Andrea Bocelli, Kiri Te Kanawa in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/classical-music-with-william-price-king/

And for the Jazz in this directory.

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-jazz-and-music-series/

Thank you so much for stopping by and your feedback is always very welcome. Thanks Sally