Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Guest Writer – Robbie Cheadle – The York Chocolate Series Part Five – Chocolate in wartime Second World War 1939 – 1945


It has been so interesting and informative to find out about The York Chocolate story and the treat everyone enjoys. Author Robbie Cheadle has been sharing  The York Chocolate story with us, following her recent trip to the UK..  You can find part four HERE

The York Chocolate Series Part Five – Chocolate in wartime Second World War 1939 – 1945

When World War II commenced in 1939, the confectionary factories again producing chocolate for the troops. This time, however, chocolate was part of the soldiers’ official rations.

Affected by restrictions on sugar imports and rationing, part of the Rowntree’s factory buildings were temporarily converted to produce items to help the war effort. The cream department was reconfigured for the production of munitions, Ryvita and dried egg, and the gum department was converted into a secret fuse factory. Much of Rowntree’s office space on Haxby Road was utilised by the Royal Arm Pay Corps.

Florence Clark, a woman who started working at Rowntree’s in 1923 at the age of fourteen, became one of the so called “canaries”, filling fuses at the factory during WWII. The TNT powder turned everything the workers touched yellow, including their faces, hair, hands and arms and any other exposed skin. The work was dangerous and one of Florence’s colleagues had her fingers blow off while packing boxes of shells.

At the beginning of World War II, confection production was also reduced at the Terry’s factory and part of it was taken over by F. Hills and Sons of Manchester as a shadow factory to manufacture and repair aircraft propeller blades.

Terry’s made boiled sweets for use in emergency rations that were packed for the Navy’s life-boards and also in the rescue inflatables used by air crews when their aircraft went down at sea.

Terry’s also produced chocolates for Charbonnel & Walker, London based producers of high-end chocolates, who were unable to manufacture for the period of the London Blitz.

Terry’s clock tower at their Bishopthorpe Road factory was used as a place where volunteers kept a look out for fires during and after air raids. As the factory stood next to the racecourse which was converted to a prisoner of war camp, the clock tower was also used

Picture of Terry’s clock tower from https://c20society.org.uk/botm/terrys-clock-tower-york/

British bomber plane made from fondant on a large chocolate cake iced with black icing.

©Robbie Cheadle 2019

Robbie Cheadle and her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton co-authored While the Bombs Fell set in the Second World War.

About the book

What was it like for children growing up in rural Suffolk during World War 2?

Elsie and her family live in a small double-storey cottage in Bungay, Suffolk. Every night she lies awake listening anxiously for the sound of the German bomber planes. Often they come and the air raid siren sounds signalling that the family must leave their beds and venture out to the air raid shelter in the garden.

Despite the war raging across the English channel, daily life continues with its highlights, such as Christmas and the traditional Boxing Day fox hunt, and its wary moments when Elsie learns the stories of Jack Frost and the ghostly and terrifying Black Shuck that haunts the coastline and countryside of East Anglia.
Includes some authentic World War 2 recipes

Extract

“The family ate their plain meal, accompanied by milk, fresh from the dairy, or tea. The milk tasted slightly sweet with a thick layer of cream on top of it.

Mother and Father enjoyed fresh butter on their bread. An incredible luxury during this time of war, Mother occasionally bought it on the black market in the town.

Luxuries of any kind were few and far between. Food and clothing were rationed, as well as meat. The meat allowance was only one shilling and two pence of meat per family member each week. Bacon and ham were rationed to eight ounces per family each week.

Every member of the family owned a ration book which allowed Mother to buy a limited quantity of food and clothing for the family. Father said that as an island nation, Britain imported a lot of its food and other goods from other countries across the sea.

“The Jerries are trying to make Britain weak by attacking our cargo ships with their E-boats and U-boats,” Father said. “They want to cut off our supplies of food, clothing, and petrol.”

Each family member’s ration book contained coupons, and when Mother went shopping for food or other rationed items, the shopkeepers would cut out or sign the coupons. Mother still paid money for the things she bought. The coupons didn’t replace the money they just ensured that everyone got a fair share of the food and other goods that were hard to
get hold of during the war.

Game was available, and, in this respect, the family had an advantage over others living in the towns and cities.”

One of the recent reviews for the book

While the Bombs Fell is a collection of memoirs written jointly by Robbie Cheadle and her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton. While some of the tales might be fictionalized, everything is based on memories and history experienced by Elsie during the 1940s WWII bombing of England by the Germans. What a wonderful way to conclude my July month of [mostly] autobiographical and non-fiction works.

Elsie was born shortly before the war began but knew only a life about rations, ducking for cover, and living without… at least in her first few years. While I know a lot about the war and life in the last century, I learned more through these stories. Elsie and her siblings struggled immensely. Imagine daily life without showers, toilets, heat, prepared meals, or other modern conveniences? We think we know what it’s like when we catch a 30-second glimpse on a television spot or hear someone mention it, but to read twenty or thirty pages in each major tale–reliving the experience through Elsie’s words–it’s a whole lot different. I wonder if people today (born in the last 30 years) could survive such a life. I’d definitely struggle, and I’m somewhere between these two generations.

This memoir isn’t meant to be an all-inclusive look at life during the war. It’s more like the authors have shined a spotlight on 8 to 10 specific experiences that as a larger collection offer a taste of the past. It’s also an opportunity to understand where Elsie came from and for her to remember both the good and the bad. What I liked most about the book was Elsie’s focus on turning negative events into something positive or a lesson for the future. The book could’ve easily just told a sad story and let readers wallow in the pain of the past. Instead, it’s an inspirational outlook on how our past sometimes denotes who we are capable of becoming. Elsie seems like a wonderful woman, particularly seeing the way she was raised and how special her mother was.

I’m really glad I had the opportunity to read this one. Not only did I feel several heartwarming emotions, but I also saw the wonderful relationship between the two authors. Having read other books by Robbie before, I can see where she gets her talent at weaving together descriptions, characters, and personal experiences. This is the kind of story to share with your older relatives who might remember going through some of these moments in their own lives. It’s also good to show those who are so far removed from it what the past was really like. Kudos to both authors. Seeing the “Nethergate” reference in this book makes me even more excited for Robbie’s upcoming fall YA release – I wonder how they will connect?

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GZ2NZFK/

And Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07GZ2NZ

A selection of other Sir Chocolate stories co-written with Michael Cheadle and other books by Robbie Cheadle

Read all the reviews and buy the books:https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

Read more reviews and follow Robbie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle

About Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with five published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

I have been drawn to the horror and supernatural genres of books all my life. At the age of ten years old I embarked on reading Stephen King’s books including The Shining and Salem’s Lot. These books scared me so much I had to put them aside by 6P.M. in the evening in order to get a good night’s sleep but they also fascinated me. I subsequently worked my way through all of Stephen King’s earlier books as well as those of Dean R. Koontz.

I have read a large number of classics, in particular, I enjoy Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Charles Dickens and the works of the Bronte sisters.

I am hugely interested in the history of the United Kingdom as well as the mythology and tales of the paranormal that are abundant on this intriguing European island.

Connect to Robbie Cheadle

Website/Blog Roberta Writes: https://robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com/
Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/
Website: https://www.robbiecheadle.co.za:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SirChocolateBooks/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bakeandwrite

My thanks to Robbie for sharing this series with us and I have discovered so much more about my favourite food group.

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Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #PotLuck – #Kidsbooks – The life of Roald Dahl by Robbie Cheadle


Welcome to the series of Posts from Your Archives, where bloggers put their trust in me. In this series, I dive into a blogger’s archives and select four posts to share here to my audience.

If you would like to know how it works here is the original post: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/04/28/smorgasbord-posts-from-your-archives-newseries-pot-luck-and-do-you-trust-me/

Today we continue the series of posts from Robbie Cheadle who has two blogs that I can select from. This week I have chosen a post from Robbie’s Inspiration Robbie writes for both children and adults, but clearly children’s books are very dear to her heart… here is a post that demonstrates that.

#Kidsbooks – The life of Roald Dahl by Robbie Cheadle

Roald Dahl

Photograph from The Official Roald Dahl Website

On 13 September 1916 one of the most popular children’s authors in the world was born in Llandaff, Wales, United Kingdom.

Roald Dahl was born to Norwegian parents, Harald Dahl and Sophie Magdalene Hesselberg, during a period in history that is commonly known as World War 1 or the Great War. He had two older sisters and two younger sisters as well as a half brother and sister from his father’s previous marriage.

At the young age of four, Roald’s older sister, Astri, died, followed by his father a few months later. This left his mother alone with six children to raise, one of which was still in-utero.

Roald stated his schooling at the local Cathedral school for boys and went on to Repton, a famous British Public School near Derby. His interesting days at Repton are depicted in his autobiography, Boy: Tales of Childhood. One memorable event was when the pupils at Repton were invited to trial chocolate bars. This memory later partially inspired his children’s book, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

Dahl left school in 1934 and started working at Shell Oil’s offices in London. It was at this point in his life that he started writing spoofs and drawing sketches.

In 1938, he transferred to the company’s offices in Dar-es-Salaam, in Tanzania, East Africa. One year into his three-year contract, World War II broke out and Dahl went to Nairobi, Kenya to join the Royal Air Force. He was 23 years old at the time. His autobiography about this time of his life, Going Solo, states that thirteen of the sixteen men who trained to fly Tiger Moth planes in Nairobi together were killed over the next two years.

In 1940, Dahl was posted to Libya and in September he crashed into the Western Desert of North Africa. He sustained serious injuries and spend six months recovering in a hospital in Alexandria, Egypt. In early 1941, he rejoined his squadron in Athens. In April 1941 his was one of the 12 remaining Hurricane aeroplanes from his squadron that took part in the Battle of Athens. A further 5 of the Hurricanes were destroyed during this battle. Later that year, Dahl started to suffer terrible headaches as a result of his crash in Libya and he was invalided home to Great Britain.

In April 1942, at the age of 26, Dahl was posted to Washington D.C. to work for the British Embassy. It was there that he met British novelist, C.S. Forrester, who encouraged him to write his experiences in Libya. His story was later published anonymously in the Saturday Evening Post. This success was followed by other published stories in newspapers and magazines, including a series in Cosmopolitan.

In 1946, Dahl’s first short-story collection was published, followed by his dark book for adults called, Some Time Never, in 1948.

Roald Dahl married to an American actress, Patricia Neal, in 1953 and they had five children together.

Between 1955 and 1968, Dahl wrote a script for a Broadway play and scripts for the television Alfred Hitchcock Presents series as well as co-writing the screenplays for You Only Live Twice (James Bond) and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. During this period he also published his children’s books James and the Giant Peach and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory as well as some adult novels. Fantastic Mr Fox was published in 1970 followed by Danny the Champion of the World, The Enormous Crocodile and My Uncle Oswald.

Sophie and the BFG from The BFG

Roald Dahl died on the 23rd November 1990 at the age of 74.

You can read my reviews of my favourite three Roald Dahl books here: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/2018/07/27/interestingliterature-my-favourite-roald-dahl-books/

Sources:

Who2 Biographies
Wikipedia
The Official Roald Dahl Website

A wonderful tribute to this amazing author who still is a huge part of children’s lives. thanks Robbie.

A selection of books by Robbie Cheadle

One of the recent reviews for While the Bombs Fell

May 02, 2019 Jacquie rated it Five Stars

The story of life behind war zones.

Elsie is born in England during a tumultuous period in history- WWII. Her family must learn to live on rations, restricted power, blackout posters, and food stamps while still providing milk to the nearby village.

Elsie understands the threat of war. The fear of German bombers is a backdrop to an everyday life without extras, but the family still manages to enjoy simple pleasures such as summer swims, afternoon tea, and on special occasions small gifts and treats.

I found it fascinating to read the lives of those not directly involved in the war effort. The average citizens just trying to survive what must have been a frightening time. While Elsie is young, she still grasps the stress her parents are under to provide a safe, warm home for their family.

Standout lines:

Britain had been at war with Nazi Germany since 1 September 1939, and the little girl could not remember a time when the distribution of food, coal, and clothing had not been controlled. She listened for the sound of bomber planes and air raid sirens without even realising it and even possessed her own gas mask.

While the Bombs Fell- Robbie Cheadle & Elsie Hancy Eaton
The air raid shelter smelled damp and musty, and the dark felt as thick as velvet curtains before Father lit the paraffin lamp.

While the Bombs Fell- Robbie Cheadle & Elsie Hancy Eaton
This is an enlightening read about village life in wartorn times.

I give While the Bombs Fell 5 lovely Kisses!

Read all the reviews and buy the books:https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

Read more reviews and follow Robbie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle

About Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with five published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

I have been drawn to the horror and supernatural genres of books all my life. At the age of ten years old I embarked on reading Stephen King’s books including The Shining and Salem’s Lot. These books scared me so much I had to put them aside by 6P.M. in the evening in order to get a good night’s sleep but they also fascinated me. I subsequently worked my way through all of Stephen King’s earlier books as well as those of Dean R. Koontz.

I have read a large number of classics, in particular, I enjoy Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Charles Dickens and the works of the Bronte sisters.

I am hugely interested in the history of the United Kingdom as well as the mythology and tales of the paranormal that are abundant on this intriguing European island.

Connect to Robbie Cheadle

Website/Blog Roberta Writes: https://robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com/
Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/
Website: https://bakeandwrite.co.za/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SirChocolateBooks/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bakeandwrite

Thanks to Robbie for allowing me to browse through her archives to select some posts to share with you..

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #PotLuck – UK2018 – Three parks and Sherlock Holmes house by Robbie Cheadle


Welcome to the series of Posts from Your Archives, where bloggers put their trust in me. In this series, I dive into a blogger’s archives and select four posts to share here to my audience.

If you would like to know how it works here is the original post: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/04/28/smorgasbord-posts-from-your-archives-newseries-pot-luck-and-do-you-trust-me/

Today we have another post from Robbie Cheadle who has two blogs that I can select from. This week I have chosen a post from Robbie’s Inspiration  which shares the trip that Robbie and her husband made to the UK in 2018 and some site seeing in London.

UK2018 – Three parks and Sherlock Holmes house by Robbie Cheadle

Mr Fox and I have been visiting London. On our own! Not my first choice actually, I miss my boys a great deal but they restarted school yesterday and it is an important term with examinations for both of them so it wasn’t practical to bring them with us.

The one nice thing is that you can log onto Wifi just about everywhere in London so I could text them all day long. Greg also called me [a few times] about very important things like whether he really had to go to his music lesson on the first day of the new term [it is so tiring to go back to school after a month of holiday doing absolutely nothing] and where his blazer is [in his cupboard – big surprise that]. Anyhow, my mother assures me that they are all surviving [her and my dad, of course, the boys are fine] and I don’t need to fret.

Mr Fox is a traveler. He is thrilled to have this opportunity to tour on our own. He could make me suffer through every tourist attraction in London in just two days Together we could enjoy seeing just about the whole of London in two days.

On Sunday we stepped off the plane one hour late. We were delayed in Johannesburg due to sick children having to be taken off the flight and the family’s luggage laboriously hunted down and removed. This happened with two children from two entirely different families. I kid you not!

We got the Heathway Express to Paddington and made our way to our hotel. We couldn’t check in at 9.15am but we could leave our luggage there. Our first stop after setting out from the hotel in pursuit of the life of normal English people [I was given very strict instructions by my mom not to spend the whole two days looking at the houses of long dead authors but to see how the English live] was Norfolk Park. What a delightful place. I loved it.

We then took the tube to Baker Street and visited 221B Baker Street, the illustrious home of the fictitious Mr Holmes. I have not actually read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s books but Greg loves them so much I visited on his behalf. It was fascinating. In the books he has pictures of famous criminals on the walls. This was replicated with real criminals and the guide told us a few of their stories. Perfectly thrilling.

We then took an exhausting enchanting walk through Regent’s Park. It is very beautiful and I loved the flowers and took loads of photographs of just about every flower in the park [when in London behave like a tourist]. I even took a photograph of a vendor of doughnuts and he laughed at me when I said I was a tourist.

It was then time to take the tube back to Paddington and check into our hotel to freshen up so that I could be dragged taken to Saint James Park to see the pelicans, swans and other lovely birds that live there. It was a beautiful walk and I am glad we did it even if I had only slept 2 hours of the overnight flight and my feet were burning from running after Terence [he takes one step for every two of mine]. We did 18 000 of his steps which is about 30 000 steps for me.

Even the impervious Terence caved after this third park and we went to a lovely pub for a traditional English cider. I wanted a pub dinner but that was not to be as Terence had a fancy for Indian food [he would have let me have a pub dinner if I really wanted it but I knew he really fancied the Indian meal and I didn’t really mind].

London Day 1

The Indian restaurant was, thankfully, only about 20 steps from our hotel so I made it back without needing a piggy back and gratefully dived straight into my bed.

All in all, a fantastic day in London.

©Robbie Cheadle 2018

Glad the sun shone for Robbie and her husband’s day in London.. the parks at their best too.

A selection of books by Robbie Cheadle

One of the recent reviews for While the Bombs Fell

May 02, 2019 Jacquie rated it Five Stars

The story of life behind war zones.

Elsie is born in England during a tumultuous period in history- WWII. Her family must learn to live on rations, restricted power, blackout posters, and food stamps while still providing milk to the nearby village.

Elsie understands the threat of war. The fear of German bombers is a backdrop to an everyday life without extras, but the family still manages to enjoy simple pleasures such as summer swims, afternoon tea, and on special occasions small gifts and treats.

I found it fascinating to read the lives of those not directly involved in the war effort. The average citizens just trying to survive what must have been a frightening time. While Elsie is young, she still grasps the stress her parents are under to provide a safe, warm home for their family.

Standout lines:

Britain had been at war with Nazi Germany since 1 September 1939, and the little girl could not remember a time when the distribution of food, coal, and clothing had not been controlled. She listened for the sound of bomber planes and air raid sirens without even realising it and even possessed her own gas mask.

While the Bombs Fell- Robbie Cheadle & Elsie Hancy Eaton
The air raid shelter smelled damp and musty, and the dark felt as thick as velvet curtains before Father lit the paraffin lamp.

While the Bombs Fell- Robbie Cheadle & Elsie Hancy Eaton
This is an enlightening read about village life in wartorn times.

I give While the Bombs Fell 5 lovely Kisses!

Read all the reviews and buy the books:https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

Read more reviews and follow Robbie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle

About Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with five published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

I have been drawn to the horror and supernatural genres of books all my life. At the age of ten years old I embarked on reading Stephen King’s books including The Shining and Salem’s Lot. These books scared me so much I had to put them aside by 6P.M. in the evening in order to get a good night’s sleep but they also fascinated me. I subsequently worked my way through all of Stephen King’s earlier books as well as those of Dean R. Koontz.

I have read a large number of classics, in particular, I enjoy Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Charles Dickens and the works of the Bronte sisters.

I am hugely interested in the history of the United Kingdom as well as the mythology and tales of the paranormal that are abundant on this intriguing European island.

Connect to Robbie Cheadle

Website/Blog Roberta Writes: https://robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com/
Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/
Website: https://bakeandwrite.co.za/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SirChocolateBooks/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bakeandwrite

Thanks to Robbie for allowing me to browse through her archives to select some posts to share with you..

Smorgasbord Posts from Your Archives – #PotLuck – Short Story – Memorandum left by Dr Thompson by Robbie Cheadle


Welcome to the series of Posts from Your Archives, where bloggers put their trust in me. In this series, I dive into a blogger’s archives and select four posts to share here to my audience.

If you would like to know how it works here is the original post: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2019/04/28/smorgasbord-posts-from-your-archives-newseries-pot-luck-and-do-you-trust-me/

Today we have the second post from Robbie Cheadle who has two blogs that I can select from.  I have picked another post this week from and it is a short story in response to one of Sue Vincent’s Photo Prompt Challenges

Memorandum left by Dr Thompson by Robbie Cheadle.

I write this and leave it where it can be eventually found so that future generations may understand my part in the undoing of the world as we knew it.

I know that I am dying. The symptoms of my radiation poisoning have become more acute despite the fact that I was not close to the centre of the nuclear explosion. My nausea and vomiting have weakened me so I barely have the strength to write. I must write though, even if I die by doing so. The future generations who manage to survive this disaster have a right to know what happened.

I knew when the integrated World Government decided to implement my fully fledged world-wide cyber-physical system known as Gemma, ten years ago, it would cause an increase in economic inequality in the world. Gemma had been carefully designed with intelligent mechanisms to improve the interaction between its computation and physical elements, thereby, increasing its adaptability, autonomy, efficiency, functionality, reliability, safety and usability.

The biggest potential issue we identified was that of increased unemployment in the world due to Gemma’s ability to automate tasks in service industries.

“People will no longer be required in call centres or retail and administrative roles,” I told them. “Goods and services will be sourced and supplied by globally connected digital platforms. Many other physical and routine task based jobs will also be destroyed by the introduction of the many robots and robotic systems that will link to Gemma. Fewer jobs will be created in a world controlled by Gemma, and those that are created will require higher levels of education and specialised study than the millions of jobs that will disappear.”

The World Government had to make a decision about whether to implement Gemma, and risk the potential increase in social unrest due to high levels of unemployment, or not. I provided the decision makers with all of my team’s data and the results of our analysis of the potential impact of the system on jobs throughout the world, developed and undeveloped. My team was made up of engineers and scientists; we did not have a single psychologist on our payroll.

The majority of the members of parliament believed that the resultant social unrest could be controlled. “We’ll introduce a world-wide system of unemployment benefits for unemployed people. We can also provide them with public or social housing. The benefits and social houses can be funded by an additional government tariff levied on the digital platforms.”

Most of the participants in the meeting had a vested interest in the digital platforms. They stood to gain substantial wealth from the implementation of Gemma. As a group, they decided to go ahead with the introduction of the system.

“The majority of people will be happy to live on benefits and have a free house,” one MP argued. “We can also introduce free entertainment in the form of television and repetitive computer games that do not involve strategy or encourage the development of complex problem solving skills and lateral thinking skills. We’ll keep them dumbed down and they won’t even realise it.”

World Government could not have been more wrong. This proved to be the worst decision ever made in the history of mankind.

©Robbie Cheadle 2019

Something to think about….. thanks Robbie.

This post was written for Sue Vincent’s weekly photo challenge Decisions.  https://scvincent.com/2019/04/11/thursday-photo-prompt-decisions-writephoto/

A selection of books by Robbie Cheadle

One of the recent reviews for While the Bombs Fell

May 02, 2019 Jacquie rated it Five Stars

The story of life behind war zones.

Elsie is born in England during a tumultuous period in history- WWII. Her family must learn to live on rations, restricted power, blackout posters, and food stamps while still providing milk to the nearby village.

Elsie understands the threat of war. The fear of German bombers is a backdrop to an everyday life without extras, but the family still manages to enjoy simple pleasures such as summer swims, afternoon tea, and on special occasions small gifts and treats.

I found it fascinating to read the lives of those not directly involved in the war effort. The average citizens just trying to survive what must have been a frightening time. While Elsie is young, she still grasps the stress her parents are under to provide a safe, warm home for their family.

Standout lines:

Britain had been at war with Nazi Germany since 1 September 1939, and the little girl could not remember a time when the distribution of food, coal, and clothing had not been controlled. She listened for the sound of bomber planes and air raid sirens without even realising it and even possessed her own gas mask.

While the Bombs Fell- Robbie Cheadle & Elsie Hancy Eaton
The air raid shelter smelled damp and musty, and the dark felt as thick as velvet curtains before Father lit the paraffin lamp.

While the Bombs Fell- Robbie Cheadle & Elsie Hancy Eaton
This is an enlightening read about village life in wartorn times.

I give While the Bombs Fell 5 lovely Kisses!

Read all the reviews and buy the books:https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

Read more reviews and follow Robbie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle

About Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, short for Roberta, is an author with five published children’s picture books in the Sir Chocolate books series for children aged 2 to 9 years old (co-authored with her son, Michael Cheadle), one published middle grade book in the Silly Willy series and one published preteen/young adult fictionalised biography about her mother’s life as a young girl growing up in an English town in Suffolk during World War II called While the Bombs Fell (co-authored with her mother, Elsie Hancy Eaton). All of Robbie’s children’s book are written under Robbie Cheadle and are published by TSL Publications. Robbie has recently branched into adult horror and supernatural writing and, in order to clearly differential her children’s books from her adult writing, these will be published under Roberta Eaton Cheadle. Robbie has two short stories in the horror/supernatural genre included in Dark Visions, a collection of 34 short stories by 27 different authors and edited by award winning author, Dan Alatorre. These short stories are published under Robbie Cheadle.

I have been drawn to the horror and supernatural genres of books all my life. At the age of ten years old I embarked on reading Stephen King’s books including The Shining and Salem’s Lot. These books scared me so much I had to put them aside by 6P.M. in the evening in order to get a good night’s sleep but they also fascinated me. I subsequently worked my way through all of Stephen King’s earlier books as well as those of Dean R. Koontz.

I have read a large number of classics, in particular, I enjoy Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Charles Dickens and the works of the Bronte sisters.

I am hugely interested in the history of the United Kingdom as well as the mythology and tales of the paranormal that are abundant on this intriguing European island.

Connect to Robbie Cheadle

Website/Blog Roberta Writes: https://robertawrites235681907.wordpress.com/
Blog: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/
Website: https://bakeandwrite.co.za/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SirChocolateBooks/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/bakeandwrite

Thanks to Robbie for allowing me to browse through her archives to select some posts to share with you..

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – Author Update #Reviews – Robbie Cheadle, Leslie Tate, Peter Weisz


Welcome to the Friday edition of the Cafe and Bookstore where I share recent reviews for authors on the shelves.

The first author is Robbie Cheadle who is also a frequent contributor with her excellent book reviews for other authors. Here is a recent review for While the Bombs Fell  that she co-wrote with her mother Elsie Hancy Eaton.

About While the Bombs Fell

What was it like for children growing up in rural Suffolk during World War 2?

Elsie and her family live in a small double-storey cottage in Bungay, Suffolk. Every night she lies awake listening anxiously for the sound of the German bomber planes. Often they come and the air raid siren sounds signalling that the family must leave their beds and venture out to the air raid shelter in the garden.

Despite the war raging across the English channel, daily life continues with its highlights, such as Christmas and the traditional Boxing Day fox hunt, and its wary moments when Elsie learns the stories of Jack Frost and the ghostly and terrifying Black Shuck that haunts the coastline and countryside of East Anglia. Includes some authentic World War 2 recipes

One of the recent reviews for the book

May 02, 2019 Jacquie rated it Five Stars

The story of life behind war zones.

Elsie is born in England during a tumultuous period in history- WWII. Her family must learn to live on rations, restricted power, blackout posters, and food stamps while still providing milk to the nearby village.

Elsie understands the threat of war. The fear of German bombers is a backdrop to an everyday life without extras, but the family still manages to enjoy simple pleasures such as summer swims, afternoon tea, and on special occasions small gifts and treats.

I found it fascinating to read the lives of those not directly involved in the war effort. The average citizens just trying to survive what must have been a frightening time. While Elsie is young, she still grasps the stress her parents are under to provide a safe, warm home for their family.

Standout lines:

Britain had been at war with Nazi Germany since 1 September 1939, and the little girl could not remember a time when the distribution of food, coal, and clothing had not been controlled. She listened for the sound of bomber planes and air raid sirens without even realising it and even possessed her own gas mask.

While the Bombs Fell- Robbie Cheadle & Elsie Hancy Eaton
The air raid shelter smelled damp and musty, and the dark felt as thick as velvet curtains before Father lit the paraffin lamp.

While the Bombs Fell- Robbie Cheadle & Elsie Hancy Eaton
This is an enlightening read about village life in wartorn times.

I give While the Bombs Fell 5 lovely Kisses!

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GZ2NZFK

And Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/While-Bombs-Fell-Robbie-Cheadle-ebook/dp/B07GZ2NZFK

A selection of other books by Robbie and Michael Cheadle

Read all the reviews and buy the books: https://www.amazon.com/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

And on Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robbie-Cheadle/e/B01N9J62GQ

Read more reviews and follow Robbie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15584446.Robbie_Cheadle

Connect to Robbie: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/

The next author with a recent review is Leslie Tate for the final novel in the Lavender Blues Trilogy.. Violet

About Violet

The passionate, late-life love of Beth and James begins in 2003 on a blind date in a London restaurant. Attracted by James’s cheerful openness, Beth is drawn into an unlikely encounter between his larkiness and her own romantic faith. From then on they bond, exchanging love-texts, exploring sea walks and gardens and sharing their past lives with flashbacks to Beth’s rural childhood and her marriage to a dark, charismatic minister.

Telling stories runs in Beth’s family, so she keeps up with her friends, following their efforts to find love in a soulless, materialistic world. But Beth’s own passion for giving and commitment is pushed to the limits as she and James struggle with her divorce, problems with each other’s children, and life-threatening illness. In the end, tested by pain, they discover something larger than themselves that goes beyond suffering and loss.
Violet, with its in-depth portrait of contemporary relationships, gallery of characters and links to Purple and Blue, is the climax to the Lavender Blues trilogy, and a powerfully observed, realistic account of modern love.

One of the recent reviews for the book in http://www.cutthroatmag.com/ by https://emmaclairesweeney.com/

The final novel in the Lavender Blues trilogy by British author Leslie Tate moves us beyond the earlier books’ explorations of free love, traditional courtship and open marriage into a lyrical and poignant meditation on late-life love.

Functioning perfectly as a stand-alone novel as well as drawing the trilogy to a close, Violet is narrated by deep-thinking Beth and high-spirited James. It opens with the blind date that changes the remaining course of both their lives, capturing the childlike exuberance of early-stage romance as well as the inevitable trepidation of those on whom love has already left a deep scar. And it turns out that both Beth and James have good reason to fear.

Structured to resemble the workings of memory, Violet reaches backwards as well as forwards in time, finally excavating the dark pit of Beth’s past. The warmth offered by her parents and the wider family of their liberal church, it turns out, has done little to help her resist the magnetism of Conrad, an aspiring preacher. After they wed, her husband’s enigma soon shades into coldness, his conviction into the exertion of an unbending will. The romantic Beth, whose parents provided her with such a fine example of enduring love, has always believed in the sanctity of marriage. But her own experiences as both a wife and mother force her to face up to life’s complexity.

Easy-going James has made his peace with his previous marriage before he embarks on the romance with Beth. But, for him, the future will prove more perilous than the past, and Beth will be the source of both his sorrow and solace.

Although Violet’s setting and characters are unmistakably and endearingly British, in its insistence on nuance, its insight into the extraordinariness of the ordinary, and its investigation of faith, it shares its DNA with great North American novelists. Bringing to mind writers such as Carol Shields and Marilynne Robinson, Violet dares to offer neither the false consolation of easy answers nor the luxury of adolescent despair – a quietly courageous novel about the bravery of the everyday.

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Violet-Lavender-Blues-Three-Shades-ebook/dp/B07BNR37X

And on Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Violet-Lavender-Blues-Three-Shades-ebook/dp/B07BNR37XK

You can read the reviews and buy: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Leslie-Tate/e/B07BL5L23B

And Amazon US: https://www.amazon.com/Leslie-Tate/e/B07BL5L23B

You will find other reviews and follow Leslie on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6043204.Leslie_Tate

Connect to Leslie via his website: https://leslietate.com/

The final author today is Peter Weisz (Dip. Psych, HND, BACP), with his non-fiction book The Universal Mind.

About The Universal Mind

Are we all slaves to a gross illusion? Who are we? What is the mind, what is consciousness and what is reality? This book offers educated answers and explanations to all these questions and more.

This book motivates the reader to reconsider everything they think they know about themselves and the world today, examining the different models of creation, evolution of humanity and the universe, the essence of matter and of life itself, exploring all manner of scientific, theological, psychological and philosophical and metaphysical hypotheses and offering insights into ancient mystical wisdom and the road to enlightenment. Can it be, that this complex, living, breathing, sophisticated, opinionated, creative and conscious entity that we call human, is made up merely from a few invisible atoms of nothingness?

We are not simply made from flesh and blood – we are beings of an infinity of dimensions, too vast to contemplate, but our brains and our senses are only able to perceive that which is rooted in matter, for that is the substance from which we believe we are made. What we call reality, is most definitely not what it appears to be.

One of the recent reviews for the book

Apr 19, 2019 Freda Roetjens rated it five stars

This interesting book has taught me a thing or two and is very thought provoking indeed. All explained in layman’s terms for everyone to understand. It’s well explained and takes you to a place where you want to know more. I am looking forward to this author’s next book. If it is anything like this one I am sure to buy the next one as well.

Read the reviews and buy the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GFNZ7TP

And Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Universal-Mind-exploration-consciousness-psychology-ebook/dp/B07GFNZ7TP

Read more reviews on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/41571668-the-universal-mind

Connect to Peter via his website: https://www.peterweisz1.com/

Thank you for dropping in today and I hope that you will be leaving with some books under your arm….Sally