About Smorgasbord - Variety is the Spice of Life.

My name is Sally Cronin and I am doing what I love.. Writing. Books, short stories, Haiku and blog posts. My previous jobs are only relevant in as much as they have gifted me with a wonderful filing cabinet of memories and experiences which are very useful when putting pen to paper. I move between non-fiction health books and posts and fairy stories, romance and humour. I love variety which is why I called my blog Smorgasbord Invitation and you will find a wide range of subjects. You can find the whole story here. Find out more at https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/about-me/

A Book Review: Sam, A Shaggy Dog Story


What a wonderful review that would have Sam doing cartwheels for his memoir Sam, A Shaggy Dog Story.. He would have been around to Karen Dowdall’s in a flash as he can tell a dog lover anywhere, especially one who appreciates his passions in live… cheese and sausages… love it.

K. D. Dowdall

“Entertaining humans for cheese is a bit daft really, but cheese is cheese!” Wise words from Sam: a smart, talented, handsome, and very entertaining Collie, who, in my opinion, is the spitting image of Lassie.

Author, Sally Cronin writes, through the eyes of her beloved Collie, Sam. It is a poignant, funny, and oh so entertaining story about life with Sam.

Sam tells us about his life, and what it is like growing up dog. I couldn’t help but fall head over heels in love with Sam! And so will you! 

Sam is very literate, he did narrate this book, after all. Sam’s memoir: Sam: A Shaggy Dog Story, is a truly incredible life story of his life as a Collie. He narrates poignantly about his first memories of being a puppy, his incredible curiosity of the world around him, as well as his travels, mishaps, and friendships, and about…

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Smorgasbord Laughter Lines – Guest Comedian D.G. Kaye and a joke from my archives…It’s all in the Headlines


Debby Gies share some of the funnies this week that she feels you should not miss.. ..D.G. Kaye Writer Blog is where you will find an archive full of wonderful posts across several subjects including writing tips, social issues and book reviews.

Thanks to Debby for her eagle-eyed dedication to bringing us funnies…

D. G. Kaye – Buy: http://www.amazon.com/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO
Blog: http://www.dgkayewriter.com Goodreads: D.G. Kaye on Goodreads

Now a joke from my archives…..

It’s all in the headlines…..

Include your children when baking cakes

Something went wrong in the jet crash, experts say.

Police begin campaign to run down jaywalkers

Iraqi head seeks arms

Is there a ring of debris around Uranus?

Panda mating fails; Vet takes over.

Clinton wins budget; more lies ahead

Plane too close to ground, crash probe told.

Juvenile court to try shooting defendent

Two sisters reunited after 18 years in checkout counter (I have been in one of those queues)

War dims hope for peace.

If strike is not settled quickly it may last a while.

Man struck by lightening faces battery charge.

New study of obesity looks for larger test group

Kids make nutritious snacks

Local high school dropouts cut in half

Typhoon rips through cemetary; hundreds dead.

I hope you enjoyed our attempt to be funny….and please feel free to pass on the laughter..  thanks Sally

Smorgasbord Reblog from Norah Colvin – School Days, Reminiscences of Sally Cronin


Last Sunday I was the guest of educator and storyteller Norah Colvin as part of her new series School Day Reminiscences

Norah asked me about my education and schooling and I had to delve back over 60 years to access those memories… some interesting questions, and I am sure Norah would love to hear from you… here is a snippet and the link to read more…

School Days, Reminiscences of Sally Cronin by Norah Colvin

Welcome to the School Days, Reminiscences series in which my champion bloggers and authors share reminiscences of their school days. It’s my small way of thanking them for their support and of letting you know about their services and publications.

This week, I am pleased to introduce Sally Cronin, author, blogger and supreme supporter of authors and bloggers. Sally is a prolific writer on numerous topics on her blog and in her publications. She seems to have an infinite capacity for supporting other writers with guest posts, reviews, blog visits and comments, and shares on social media. I am constantly in awe of her output and the esteem in which she is held and I am very grateful for the support she provides me in the online world.

I am especially pleased with the timing of Sally’s interview as today 17 March is St Patrick’s Day and Sally is Irish! She even has a lovely book of Tales from the Irish Garden, published late last year.

Before we begin the interview, I’ll allow Sally to tell you a little of herself:

I have lived a fairly nomadic existence living in eight countries including Sri Lanka, South Africa and the USA before settling back here in Ireland. My work, and a desire to see some of the most beautiful parts of the world in the last forty years, has taken me to many more incredible destinations around Europe and Canada, and across the oceans to New Zealand and Hawaii. All those experiences and the people that I have met, provide a rich source of inspiration for my stories.

After a long and very happy career, I took the step to retrain as a nutritional therapist, a subject that I was very interested in, and to make the time to write my first book. Size Matters was a health and weight loss book based on my own experiences of losing 70kilo. I have written another eleven books since then on health and also fiction including three collections of short stories. I am an indie author and proud to be one. My greatest pleasure comes from those readers who enjoy my take on health, characters and twisted endings… and of course come back for more.

Welcome, Sally.

Now let’s talk school. First of all, could you tell us where you attended school?

Portsmouth UK (3), Malta, Cape Town South Africa, Preston UK,

Did you attend a government, private or independent school?

All the schools were government.

What is the highest level of education you achieved?

Diplomas in Secretarial Studies and a Diploma in Nutritional Therapy.

What work or profession did you choose after school and was there anything in school that influenced this choice?

I started as a secretary in a dental practice but within a few months started training as a dental nurse which I found more interesting.

What is you earliest memory of school?

Age four arriving at the first class at primary and noticing all the names scratched out on my extremely old desk and my teacher Mrs. Miller.

What memories do you have of learning to read?

Head over and read the rest of the interview and contact Norah about participating: https://norahcolvin.com/2019/03/17/school-days-reminiscences-of-sally-cronin

About Norah Colvin

I am an experienced and passionate educator. I teach. I write. I create.

I have spent almost all my life thinking and learning about thinking and learning.

I have been involved in many educational roles, both in and out of formal schooling situations, always combining my love of teaching and writing by creating original materials to support children’s learning.

Now as I step away from the classroom again, I embark upon my latest iteration: sharing my thoughts about education by challenging what exists while asking what could be; and inviting early childhood educators to support children’s learning through use of my original teaching materials which are now available on my website http://www.readilearn.com.au

Connect to Norah via her websites

Website: www.NorahColvin.com
Website: www.readilearn.com.au

And social media

Twitter: https://twitter.com/NorahColvin
Twitter 2:  https://twitter.com/readilearn
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100008724879054
Readilearn:  https://www.facebook.com/readilearnteachingresources/
LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/norah-colvin-14578777

Something to Think About – The R’s of Life – Survival in a Modern World – Our Right to Freedom of Speech and Religion by Sally Cronin


According to the Bill of Human Rights we are all entitled to Freedom of Speech and to follow a Religion of our choice. As I have highlighted in previous chapters, these rights come with  certain obligations that we need to fulfil to enjoy them to the fullest.

This last week in particular has seen the most dreadful breach of that right to freedom of speech and worship according to our religion, with the massacre in New Zealand. In our multicultural modern societies, this is a tragedy that is happening far too often despite billions of people around the world respecting that right and appalled by the actions of the minority. The community in Christchurch has been changed forever, and one can only hope that it will bring them together, united against such hatred and make them stronger than ever.

Freedom of Speech and Religion

We are all free to speak our minds in private, but that does not necessarily mean we will get away with it in public!  It depends on what your government has deemed as a subject you can voice your opinion about outside your own four walls!

For example in the UK:Any communication which is threatening or abusive, and is intended to harass, alarm, or distress someone is forbidden. The penalties for hate speech include fines, imprisonment, or both’.

In some countries freedom of speech is completely denied to a population and any infractions dealt with severely; in some cases with death. Religion too is not exempt from rigorous penalties rained down on individuals as well as groups of worshipers as we have seen recently.

I am sure that like me, you would never condone any speech or piece of writing that incited hatred to any group or individuals, whether it is racially offensive or is going to cause distress. However, it is becoming more of a minefield, as there are a great many subjects that have been added to the list of offensive topics all coming under the term ‘Politically Correct’.

In some schools for example, traditional activities such as nativity plays and Christmas carol services have been suspended so as not to offend those in the school who are not Christian. I don’t understand why we cannot be grown up about this and have a celebration with elements of all the religions represented by the pupils! Perhaps a celebration of spirituality and winter…… or would that be considered pagan?

I think we are all aware that most of the world’s conflicts since the dawn of time, have been primarily down to two main contributory factors. Politics and Religion. There is a good reason they are usually banned from the dinner table.  Nothing sparks off a heated debate than everyone expressing their freedom of speech on those two subjects between courses.

Many millions around the world do not have freedom of speech, and men and women are effectively gagged from talking about politics or practicing religion. It is unimaginable to me, how terrifying it must be to have to guard every word that you say and to keep your family safe in that environment.

However it is a sad fact that some of us who enjoy the right to speak our minds frequently misuse its power. Both on a personal level  and now, courtesy of the Internet, on a much wider scale.

Of course some members of our communities take their right to freedom of speech to extremes. The paparazzi for example, who feel that they have the right to intrude into people’s lives and dish the dirt even when they do not have the facts.. Sometimes they exercise their right by simply publishing a photograph with an ambiguous headline and let our imagination do the rest.  Even alleged mainstream media lean to left or right according to their financial and political affiliations rather than editorial responsibility, and there is a definitely a manipulation of facts and statistics when it comes to the political and financial institutions that govern our day to day life.

But is it not just the major media organisations who manipulate the truth to cause dissent or to stir up friction between communities. It is easy to for us as individuals to create barriers before we even begin communicating with others online.

We seem to be fixated with creating labels for ourselves and others. Certainly on official paperwork we have to define ourselves as White, Black, Asian Christian, Muslim, Sikh, Hindu, Mormon, Quaker, Catholic, Irish, English, Scottish, disabled, Gay, married, single, divorced, widowed, retired or all of the above!

But we seem to be doing this in our personal lives too. I look at the profiles of some people that approach me to connect and they appear to want to belong to as many groups as possible. Even if I was meeting them for the first time face to face, I wouldn’t have an interest in their colour, religion, sexuality, political affiliations or that they are a feminist or manist! These terms do not describe a person, only the labels they have adopted that they feel defines them. There are some things that I deem as private and don’t believe belong in a personal Facebook or blog profile.

Personally I would like to know more about what makes them a human being. What areas would we both be interested in sharing such as books, writing, the cinema, love of animals, sport, meeting new people and learning more about others. I don’t want to know about the groups or labels that might highlight our differences before we get into some form of relationship to establish how much we have in common.

What happened to the joy of belonging to the human race?

A lack of tolerance and respect for others probably raised its ugly head as humans and Neanderthals began to inhabit the same terrain around 45,000 years ago. There is some evidence that the two groups did co-exist for around 5,000 years and very probably did cohabit too. There are genetic links to a tiny proportion of modern day man that supports that theory. However, the investigation into the mystery as to why Neanderthals became extinct is still ongoing. One theory is that the modern humans migrated in as the earth warmed up and pushed the Neanderthals out over time.

Chances are that modern man wanted nice cozy caves, rich hunting grounds near to flowing rivers and established plants and fruits. It may have taken them 5000 years but in the end they got what they wanted. Including the freedom to live, worship and survive without the complication of a group with a different perspective and needs making life difficult. That was just two groups working against each other.. We now have thousands of factions all shouting about their needs and beliefs; it is no wonder that the world is in chaos.

Then of course there were the gods who have maintained their presence in our lives throughout the history of man in many guises. One group would worship the moon and others the sun and fall out over it. Some believed that their gods lived on mountains and were omnipotent.. Others felt that throwing some poor individual, preferably a virgin, into a fiery volcano would appease these legendary beings. Wars have been fought, some cultures wiped out and many of these early religions disappeared completely. However, after thousands of years, we are still following this tried and tested method to get people to join our gang or suffer the consequences.

Thankfully most people agree to differ, respect each other’s beliefs and live and let live. Yet there is an element of every society, who have defined themselves by their interpretation of a religion, and take the moral high ground, expecting everyone else to convert. There have been extremists in every religion on earth and it will always be so.

There are some individuals who assume that freedom of speech entitles them to say whatever they like, whenever they like and to whomever they like. Because of course, their political, personal or religious views are the one true path. And despite all the laws enacted against hate crimes or inflammatory language, we do not seem to be becoming any more tolerant.

You don’t even have to get up close and personal. The Internet provides a wonderful platform for free speech despite the new legislation. Which is why cyber-bullying is such a popular sport and that the main casualties are young people. Words can be brutal and young people in particular of both sexes have not concept of how devastating their comments can be to someone of their own age.

  • Over the recent years there has been an 87 % increase in the number of Childline’s counselling sessions about online bullying.
  • 40% of 7 to11 year old respondents know someone who has been cyber-bullied .
  • 7 in 10 young people aged between 13 and 22 have been a victim of cyber-bullying .
  • An estimated 5.43 million young people in the UK have experienced cyber-bullying, with 1.26 million subjected to extreme cyber-bullying on a daily basis

The statistics for bullying of gay students is even more concerning.

  • Over two in five gay pupils who experience homophobic bullying attempt or think about taking their own life as a direct consequence  Three in five young people say that bullying has a direct impact on their school work and straight-A students have told us it makes them want to leave education entirely
  • More than half (55 per cent) of lesbian, gay and bisexual young people experience homophobic bullying in Britain’s schools
  • Ninety six per cent of gay pupils hear homophobic remarks such as ‘poof’ or ‘lezza’ used in school. Almost all (99 per cent) hear phrases such as ‘that’s so gay’ or ‘you’re so gay’ in school http://www.antibullyingpro.com/blog/2015/4/7/facts-on-bullying

Of course bullying is not the only misuse of the freedom of speech. Many suicides of young people are because they do not wear the right label. They do not belong to the accepted in crowd, and because they are different, they are ostracized and isolated.

Added to this is the continuous bombardment by the media, across all communication devices, of the devastating results of human intolerance. The young of today face a climate of fear and uncertainty for the future that has never been experienced before in human history on this scale.  Is this really the world we want our young to inherit from us?

Youth Suicide Statistics In the USA

  • Suicide is the SECOND leading cause of death for ages 10-24. (2016 CDC WISQARS)
    Suicide is the SECOND leading cause of death for college-age youth and ages 12-18. (2016 CDC WISQARS)
  • More teenagers and young adults die from suicide than from cancer, heart disease, AIDS, birth defects, stroke, pneumonia, influenza, and chronic lung disease, COMBINED.
  • Each day in our nation, there are an average of over 3,041 attempts by young people grades 9-12. If these percentages are additionally applied to grades 7 & 8, the numbers would be higher.
  • Four out of Five teens who attempt suicide have given clear warning signs

It is tough to imagine that we as an individual can make a difference to the world and its chaos. But we can certainly make sure that we, and those close to us, understand that freedom of speech is a ‘right’ to be treasured. A right that when exercised with thoughtfulness, can positively change things that are broken, instil trust and understanding with others. We can set an example and be role models for our children and those we meet that have a different view of life and religion that we do.

We are too far down the road for this to change overnight. Some of the conflicts that are currently fueled by hatred and intolerance may not be resolved without more violence but we have to start somewhere and that is right here and right now.  We need to choose the words that we speak and write more carefully and treasure the right we have to use them in the first place.

At the end of the day there is only one true fact and that is we belong to just one group and the label reads:

Next time – Rejection – A Fact of Life

©sallycronin The R’s of Life 2019

Thank you for dropping in and your comments are always gratefully received.  Sally

 

More Glimpses #newbook #booklaunch


Great news… the new short story collection More Glimpses from Hugh Roberts is now available from Amazon… short descriptions of all the stories included… looks great…head over and find out more..

Hugh's Views & News  

Do you believe in fairies at the bottom of the garden? Would you dare steal items from a blind person or send your neighbours on a time-travelling trip full of menace and danger to stop the possibility of a bug wiping out humanity? Would you respond to calls for help from behind a door that is not all it seems, or ignore the warnings not to walk on a beautiful, deserted beach?

Two and a half years after the publication of Glimpses, I’m delighted to announce that my second collection of short stories, More Glimpses, is now available on Amazon.

#MoreGlimpses #Glimpses #books #shortstories #flashfiction #fiction
The second collection of short stories and flash fiction from Hugh W. Roberts

Containing 32 short stories and pieces of flash fiction, many of which have never been published before, More Glimpses takes the reader on a ride full of twists, turns and unexpected endings.

Story lineup.

  1. The Whistle

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Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Music Column with William Price King – Yusef Lateef – #Jazz multi-instrumentalist and composer


Yusef Abdul Lateef (born William Emanuel Huddleston; October 9, 1920 – December 23, 2013) was an American jazz multi-instrumentalist, composer, and prominent figure among the Ahmadiyya Community in America.

Although Lateef’s main instruments were the tenor saxophone and flute, he also played oboe and bassoon, both rare in jazz, and also used a number of non-western instruments such as the bamboo flute, shanai, shofar, xun, arghul and koto. He is known for having been an innovator in the blending of jazz with “Eastern” music. Peter Keepnews, in his New York Times obituary of Lateef, wrote that the musician “played world music before world music had a name“.

Lateef wrote and published a number of books including two novellas entitled A Night in the Garden of Love and Another Avenue, the short story collections Spheres and Rain Shapes, also his autobiography, The Gentle Giant, written in collaboration with Herb Boyd. Along with his record label YAL Records, Lateef owned Fana Music, a music publishing company. Lateef published his own work through Fana, which includes Yusef Lateef’s Flute Book of the Blues and many of his own orchestral compositions.

Let’s enjoy some of his music…….

“Blues for the Orient”, recorded in 1961, is from the album “Eastern Sounds” which explores incorporating Middle Eastern music in fusion, and hardbop.* Check out Lateef’s amazing interpretation of « Blues for the Orient » on the oboe. This laid-back album is filled with tonal and polytonal improvisation highlighting Lateef’s commitment to world musical fusion. Lateef, as usual, plays more than one instrument in this production, he introduces the Chinese xun* (globular flute) in the opening track. This album showcases Lateef’s original compositions as well as love themes from the films ‘Spartacus’ and ‘The Robe.’ Lateef is joined on this recording by Barry Harris on piano, Lex Humphries on drums, and bassist Ernie Farrow.

*Hardbop – a subgenre of jazz that is an extension of bebop (or ‘bop’) music.

*Xun – a globular, vessel flute from China. It is one of the oldest musical instruments in China and has been in use for approximately seven thousand years

The innovative “The Centaur and the Phoenix”, recorded in 1960 on the Riverside label, takes you in many directions – soulful blues, lush ballads, and many Eastern influences, highlighting Lateef’s outstanding flute work. It illustrates Yusef’s interest in expanding the orchestration of jazz. Yusef made a point of not calling his music jazz, rather “autophysiopsychic”, meaning music coming from one’s physical, mental, and spiritual self. The instrumentation he used in this recording was quite unusual at the time: this nonet* included bassoon, oboe, and two trumpets. What makes this album stand out is the balance Lateef achieves with this large group, always an asset, never a distraction, allowing his flute, oboe, tenor sax, or arghul* to rise above it all in brightness, grace and joy. He is accompanied by Ben Tucker on bass, Josea Taylor on bassoon, Lex Humphries on drums, the young Joe Zawinul on piano, Tate Houston on baritone sax, Curtis Fuller on trombone, with Clark Terry and Richard Williams on trumpet.

*Nonet – A musical composition for nine voices or instruments.

*Arghul – a musical instrument which has been used since Ancient Egyptian times and is still a traditional instrument in Egypt and Palestine. lt is a double-pipe, single-reed woodwind instrument that consists of two tubes: a melody pipe with between five and seven holes and a longer drone pipe. Its tone is similar to that of a clarinet, although a bit more reed-like.

“K.C.Shuffle” is the opening song from the album “Part of the Search”, recorded in 1974 at Atlantic Records, an album that breaks the traditional mode of recording commercial albums in that it consists of 11 songs with seven interlude tracks ranging in length from 1 to 23 seconds. Because of the album’s musical diversity it offers sort of a history of jazz in styles and expressions including Kansas City jazz, R&B, and doo wop. Lateef doubles on tenor and alto and is accompanied not only by his trio but by a big band, a string quartet, background vocals and a variety of electric keyboards and guitarists. Aside from doubling on tenor and alto sax, Lateef also plays the flute, bamboo flute, pneumatic bamboo flute, oboe, bells, and tambourine.

“Yusef Lateef’s Little Symphony” – in four movements (produced by Lateef, recorded, mixed and mastered by Norman Blain, and remastered by Dennis King) is imaginative, moving, and provocative. This is not surprising from a musician who dedicated his career to change and musical freedom coming from jazz’s rich history of improvisation and spontaneity. Billboard described this album as ‘an atmospheric four-movement classical/jazz composition.’ “Yusef Lateef’s Little Symphony” received a Grammy Award in 1988 for Best New Age Album despite the fact that Lateef had no prior association with the genre. Lateef played all of the instruments that appear on this album (reeds, flutes, shannie, gourdophone, kalangu, water drum, and percussive sitar), overdubbing each track himself.

Buy music by Yusef Lateef: https://www.amazon.com/Yusef-Lateef/e/B000AQ2B3S

Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yusef_Lateef

About William Price King

William Price King is an American jazz singer, crooner, and composer.

His interest in music began at an early age when he studied piano and clarinet in high school. At Morehouse College in Atlanta where he grew up, he sang in the Glee Club and studied classical music. After graduation he went off to the Yale School of Music where he earned a Masters degree. From there he journeyed to New York where he created a jazz trio ‘Au Naturel’ which performed in some of the hottest venues in Manhattan including gigs on Broadway and the famous ‘Rainbow Room.’ These gigs opened doors for performances in Montreal and a European tour.

While touring Europe he met a lovely French lady, Jeanne Maïstre, who, a year later became his wife. King left the group ‘Au Naturel’ and settled in the south of France where he started a new life on the French Riviera, opening his own music school – the “Price King Ecole Internationale de Chant.” He has had the pleasure over the years of seeing many of his students excel as singers on a professional level, and some going on to become national celebrities. He continues to coach young singers today, in his spare time.

His debut jazz album was entitled “Home,” and was a collection of contemporary compositions he composed, with lyrics written by his wife Jeanne King. His second album was a Duo (Voice and Guitar) with Eric Sempé on the guitar. This album included original songs as well as well known standards from contemporary jazz and pop artists. The “King-Sempé” duo toured France and thrilled audiences for more than three years before going their separate ways. King has formed a new duo with French/Greek guitarist Manolis, and is now exploring new ideas, in a smooth jazz/soul/folk direction.

In addition to singing and composing, King has been collaborating with author Sally Cronin over the past few years on her blog “Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life,” with the series “A Man And His Music – Jazz, Contemporary, Classical, and Legends” and now, the “William Price King Music Column.” Working with author Sally Cronin has been an exhilarating experience in many ways and has brought a new dimension to King’s creative life. King has also created a micro blog, “Improvisation,” which features and introduces mostly jazz artists from across the jazz spectrum who have made considerable contributions in the world of jazz; and also artwork from painters who have made their mark in the world of art. This micro blog can be found on Tumblr.

His vocal mentors are two of the greatest giants in jazz, Nat King Cole and Mel Tormé. King has a distinctive wide-ranging voice which displays a remarkable technical facility and emotional depth.

William Price King on Tumblr – IMPROVISATION https://williampriceking.tumblr.com

Connect with William

Websitehttp://www.williampriceking.com/
Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/WilliamPriceKing
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/wpkofficial
Regular Venuehttp://cave-wilson.com/ 
ITunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/william-price-king/id788678484

You can find all of the Music Column series in this directory: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/william-price-king-music-column/

As always we would love to receive your feedback.. thanks Sally and William

James Cudney: An Author’s Journey

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I read and enjoyed Academic Curveball by James Cudney and look forward to reading the others in the series.. one of which is out at the end of March. This is a terrific interview and great to find out more about James and his life and writing.  Here is an extract and I do recommend that you head over and read the rest of the interview with Laurie Woodward

James Cudney: An Author’s Journey

“I write because I love to tell stories, …share knowledge, and thoughts, ” says cozy mystery and family drama author James Cudney.  “I always wanted to be a writer…but ultimately found myself working in technology. ”

James did well as a technical writer for a telecommunications company  but as the years passed, felt like something was missing. There was constant buzzing in his brain. A whispering in his ears kept saying, You have other stories to tell.  Let them be known.   So after more than a decade of trying to ignore the whispers, James decided it was time to abandon the safety of a  day job and give full-time writing a chance.

He hasn’t looked back since.

Now some might dip into writing as if they were testing the waters of an alpine lake. First a toe. See if it’s too cold. Then another. And if it’s bearable, slowly immerse the legs. But not James. He took a deep breath and canon-balled right into those frigid waters managing in just two and a half years to write five novels, land a publishing contract, gain thousands of followers on his popular blog, and garner the respect of both reader and author alike.

If only we all could make such a splash, huh?

 

Head over and read the rest of this interesting interview…..thanks Sally

via James Cudney: An Author’s Journey

Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge Recap No. 127, #SynonymsOnly


Time for the recap of the wonderful submissions last week for Colleen Chesebro’s Weekly Poetry Challenge – Do head over and enjoy the Haibun from Holly Fister and various formats from familiar names and some new ones…

The Faery Whisperer

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item calledColleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

PLEASE NOTE: Don’t forget to count your syllables. Use this site: howmanysyllables.com.Click on the workshop tab. Then, copy and paste your poem into the box, and click “count syllables” at the bottom.

The Poet of the Week will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way…

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Smorgasbord Afternoon Video – Folding a fitted Sheet… recommended by D.G. Kaye


Thanks to Debby Gies for spotting this gem…D.G. Kaye Writer Blog is where you will find an archive full of wonderful posts across several subjects including writing tips, social issues and book reviews.

her books.

D. G. Kaye – Buy: http://www.amazon.com/D.G.-Kaye/e/B00HE028FO
Blog: http://www.dgkayewriter.com Goodreads: D.G. Kaye on Goodreads